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View Full Version : Don't You Just Hate it when People Smash Vintage Computers



themikepeng
July 3rd, 2012, 06:15 AM
it hurts so much watching people on youtube smash vintage computers even if I don't watch I know that there are mean people who smash vintage computers for fun, don't you agree? It's such a waste!:mad:

Great Hierophant
July 3rd, 2012, 06:30 AM
And then there are the yokels who blow up vintage electronics and post video...

Atari26003
July 3rd, 2012, 06:40 AM
I completely agree with you. Its come to be a hard point with me as well. The truth is, its their property and they can do with it as they wish. I remember on another forum for arcade machines they have a reseller who constantly promotes themselves by throwing machines off of the roof. Its quite depressing watching all the money drop or the hardwork that would have been put into restoring those pinballs or arcades.

DOS lives on!!
July 3rd, 2012, 06:43 AM
They have nothing better to do in a day, don't have much if any friends, and need a way to blow off anger that they don't show immediately.

FishFinger
July 3rd, 2012, 07:53 AM
It's not so much the smashing itself that annoys me as the people who make out that doing so is somehow educational or scientific. What does setting something on fire or putting a sledgehammer through it teach anybody - except what a simple-minded vandal you are?

hargle
July 3rd, 2012, 07:57 AM
just remember that the more of those things that get destroyed, that makes the ones you have collected that much more valuable!

Chuck(G)
July 3rd, 2012, 08:02 AM
Shrug. Most of what gets smashed is mass-produced, so there's likely more of whatever is being smashed around.

Some companies had a policy of utterly destroying systems when they came off lease or ceased to be useful. I witnessed the scrapping of the world's only STAR-65 supercomputer and the last two STAR-1B systems by CDC during the mid 1970s. There aren't any more of those--and never will be.

Compgeke
July 3rd, 2012, 08:31 AM
Trust me, that $5 of gold was worth destroying the rest of the system.

Pepinno
July 3rd, 2012, 09:10 AM
I don't mind much, as long as the destroyed computer belongs to the destroyer.

As it stands, I don't have time to restore to working order all the old computers being destroyed, so I look at it this way: any computer (either cared for or destroyed) ALWAYS is getting what it deserves, and I'm not the redemptor of thee.

That said, I tend on my computers with deep love. :D

Unknown_K
July 3rd, 2012, 09:21 AM
I don't see the major difference between blowing up a vintage computer (then trashing the leftovers) or just trashing them. For every collector of vintage machines there are 10000 who view them as obsolete junk. Recycling is a good thing.

barythrin
July 3rd, 2012, 09:23 AM
How about the trend of buying the latest console/hitech gadget then smashing it in front of the waiting line folks? Or the will it blend people blending ipod/pads?

k2x4b524[
July 3rd, 2012, 01:43 PM
it's pretty much the same thing,i've seen an ipad 2 get demolished in front of an apple store and it's like the whole world just stopped, like time had frozen. IT WAS AN IPAD... Sheesh...., i've dropped my samsung focus smartphone like 30 times and the damn thing still chuggs...

SpidersWeb
July 3rd, 2012, 01:52 PM
How about the trend of buying the latest console/hitech gadget then smashing it in front of the waiting line folks? Or the will it blend people blending ipod/pads?

I think smashing the device in front of people waiting for it, is a bit cruel/stupid. But I'm not worried about the device because they're still in production.
When I see rare equipment which is no longer being made and there is demand, then I get furious. It's their stuff so I don't say anything, but it does make me quite angry.
Smashing it provides a short amount of joy/fun for the person, but sell it to someone who appreciates it and you get $$$ and they get to enjoy it long term.

Doug G
July 3rd, 2012, 02:08 PM
Some companies had a policy of utterly destroying systems when they came off lease or ceased to be useful. I witnessed the scrapping of the world's only STAR-65 supercomputer and the last two STAR-1B systems by CDC during the mid 1970s. There aren't any more of those--and never will be.Oh, the satisfaction of swinging a sledgehammer into card cage full of perfectly good working circuit boards! I worked for CDC in the 70's and was "drafted" one day to help destroy a truck full of working 300lpm CDC drum printers. We had to remove the serial number tags and some other identifying tags, then physically destroy the units. They would have been worth 5-10K each on the used marked, but CDC didn't want any further responsibility for them and ordered them destroyed. We had to send all the serial tags up to HQ in Minneapolis as proof.

WMH
July 3rd, 2012, 02:37 PM
I think smashing the device in front of people waiting for it, is a bit cruel/stupid. But I'm not worried about the device because they're still in production.
When I see rare equipment which is no longer being made and there is demand, then I get furious. It's their stuff so I don't say anything, but it does make me quite angry.
Smashing it provides a short amount of joy/fun for the person, but sell it to someone who appreciates it and you get $$$ and they get to enjoy it long term.

Agreed, I couldn't say it better myself.

I can't see why anyone would want to destroy pieces of electronics history. I mean, if they want to destroy something, at least don't destroy a helpless vintage computer! :nervous: You could make some serious cash on certain machines and give someone enjoyment, as SpidersWeb pointed out.

Chuck(G)
July 3rd, 2012, 03:16 PM
Oh, the satisfaction of swinging a sledgehammer into card cage full of perfectly good working circuit boards! I worked for CDC in the 70's and was "drafted" one day to help destroy a truck full of working 300lpm CDC drum printers. We had to remove the serial number tags and some other identifying tags, then physically destroy the units. They would have been worth 5-10K each on the used marked, but CDC didn't want any further responsibility for them and ordered them destroyed. We had to send all the serial tags up to HQ in Minneapolis as proof.

After all these years, I still have a couple of cordwood modules from a 6600, a heatsink from the 1B and a head from an 808 (I also smuggled out a couple of platters also, but those are long gone). The shame was that a lot of the smaller gear wasn't even soldl off as scrap, just deposited in the big dumpster out back and crushed by the compactor, thence to the landfill.

It's really sad.

themikepeng
July 3rd, 2012, 05:57 PM
Exactly where I was getting at
I don't really care if someone smashes 30 computers that are still in production, but it is insane to destroy something in high demand, not in production and working perfectly just for enterainment. They will be gone forever and never replaced. Many others that are less crazy just recycle them and if this continues the only surviving vintage computers will be ones held by collectors that or very understanding people... But it's still theirs so no one can stop them

Doug G
July 3rd, 2012, 10:06 PM
It's really sad.Our little demolition derby sparked some pretty heated discussions about why the equipment wasn't just sold as is. Lengthy explanations about warranty, the law, liability, the gray market and precedents finally got us to understand both sides of the equation. It was sad to see and participate in the destruction, but at least the pieces went on to a metal recycler not the compactor.

I never got involved when a couple older cyber systems were scrapped. Our group worked on CDC's OEM disks and printers usually attached to non-CDC systems.

Chuck(G)
July 3rd, 2012, 11:09 PM
As I heard it, equipment that had been sold to the scrap dealers showed up on a customer's site and the brass went ballistic. The order came down that any retired equipment was to be reduced to garbage before it left the premises. I know of a fellow who managed to sneak out a retired Singer-Friden terminal by bribing the guy on the loading dock, but that was the only case I remember after the "kill 'em all" order came down.

A lot of that old equipment was built to last. I think the COMSOURCE data center in Sunnyvale still had a couple of 501 drum printers and one of those big Bryant 6603 drives in use as late as 1975. Sometime around 1974, I saw a couple of 160As show up from god-knows-where. All of which eventually went under the sledgehammer and bolt cutters.

Maverick1978
July 4th, 2012, 08:41 AM
I guess I have a different view - don't watch the stupid videos.

Then again, I'm probably one of the few heavy computer people my age who abhors youtube.

animekenji
July 5th, 2012, 06:39 AM
just remember that the more of those things that get destroyed, that makes the ones you have collected that much more valuable!

It also makes the ones you DON'T have more expensive. :(

iulianv
July 5th, 2012, 07:12 AM
Found this link on another forum: http://www.sgidepot.co.uk/destruction.html

tone76
July 5th, 2012, 01:44 PM
It depends on the machine.

If it was some no-name white box 486SX mated to of those PC-Chips motherboards with the fake cache, then pass me the sledgehammer. But if it was something rare (such as a Soviet-era 5150 Clone or one of the many obscure European 8-bit machines of the 1980s) and/or interesting, then I'd be quite sad to see it being destroyed.

barythrin
July 5th, 2012, 02:14 PM
Yes but the irony is the no-name clone will probably have less out in the wild for that exact reason and thus in theory would be more collectible. Similarly to something that completely failed in the market and was pulled early.. another irony in perceived value whether it was a crappy device or not.

My friend is a car enthusiast and interestingly gets pissed any time he sees a nice sports car get smashed in the movies. It's interesting how one thing can have so much value to one person and not another. To me I could care less about a Lamborghini getting smashed or tossed in the trash but I also wouldn't pay more than a few thousand for one and would rather have a few select vintage computers if I had the choice. Rare car sitting next to an IBM 5100 for sale or not, you already know which one's going to get my jaw to drop.

I'm bigoted though since I do find it sorta humorous to smash the latest technology in front of the crowd that camped out in line for days prior to some cliche devices release. But that's probably more of a social statement than technological destruction in my mind.

tezza
July 5th, 2012, 02:25 PM
Yes but the irony is the no-name clone will probably have less out in the wild for that exact reason and thus in theory would be more collectible. Similarly to something that completely failed in the market and was pulled early.. another irony in perceived value whether it was a crappy device or not.

Hmm...I'm not sure it is just rarity. I've seen some very rare oddball models go on our local auction site for a song. I think it's RARITY+CULTURAL VALUE = COLLECTABLE. It has to have some cultural value...either was popular, well-known and/or set a trend, or somehow have historical significance. If you add NEW IN BOX to that equation then you get VERY COLLECTABLE.


I'm bigoted though since I do find it sorta humorous to smash the latest technology in front of the crowd that camped out in line for days prior to some cliche devices release. But that's probably more of a social statement than technological destruction in my mind.

LOL. I like it!

Tez

Anonymous Freak
July 5th, 2012, 09:50 PM
So I do have to admit to doing the very worst of all: videotaping while destroying a vintage computer, then posting it to YouTube.

Although I beg forgiveness under the explanation that all computers I have ever done this to were: very common (Mac Plus, Mac Classic, PowerBook 5300c, some nameless PCs,) broken beyond any reasonable repair, and all offered up for at least a month on both local and nationwide forums 'free plus shipping' with no takers - in each case, with the final disposition announced ahead of time.

Of course, after each, we gathered up all the debris and took them to a recycler.

DOS lives on!!
July 6th, 2012, 02:32 AM
Yes but the irony is the no-name clone will probably have less out in the wild for that exact reason and thus in theory would be more collectible...............
..........I'm bigoted though since I do find it sorta humorous to smash the latest technology in front of the crowd that camped out in line for days prior to some cliche devices release. But that's probably more of a social statement than technological destruction in my mind.
I'd say my Computer computer fits into that category. It's a cheap generic 486 computer, but it's the name tag that's going to let it stay for a long time. And probably worth more (to some people).

I have actually never done storefront smashing of a newly bought device, but now that you mention it........

tone76
July 6th, 2012, 04:07 AM
Yes but the irony is the no-name clone will probably have less out in the wild for that exact reason and thus in theory would be more collectible.

Potentially yes. The example I was citing was notorously bad, though. I'm guessing you'd be familar with the infamous PC-Chips Fake Cache (http://redhill.net.au/b/b-bad.html) motherboards doing the rounds in the mid 90s ... but, then again, maybe one of those may be worth keeping, if only as a reminder that those that forget history may be doomed to repeat it ...


I'm bigoted though since I do find it sorta humorous to smash the latest technology in front of the crowd that camped out in line for days prior to some cliche devices release. But that's probably more of a social statement than technological destruction in my mind.

:D I like the cut of your jib. You're right in that it's a social statement: many of these folks that line up to be the first to own whichever shiny new device is being peddled by a certain fruit-based technology manufacturer tend to be not so much interested in the device, as the status it affords them within their own circles for the brief few weeks before every other person in their social circle has the same device ... ;)

Securix
July 6th, 2012, 09:49 AM
Kinda off-topic but worth mentioning anyway...

I was pretty sad when GM ordered the surrender and obliteration of all post-lease EV-1 electric cars. Only a few survived and were donated to museums, universities, etc, with the stipulation they never be driven on public roads. The rationale was liability and I.P. issues.

animekenji
July 6th, 2012, 09:52 AM
Yes but the irony is the no-name clone will probably have less out in the wild for that exact reason and thus in theory would be more collectible. Similarly to something that completely failed in the market and was pulled early.. another irony in perceived value whether it was a crappy device or not.

My friend is a car enthusiast and interestingly gets pissed any time he sees a nice sports car get smashed in the movies. It's interesting how one thing can have so much value to one person and not another. To me I could care less about a Lamborghini getting smashed or tossed in the trash but I also wouldn't pay more than a few thousand for one and would rather have a few select vintage computers if I had the choice. Rare car sitting next to an IBM 5100 for sale or not, you already know which one's going to get my jaw to drop.

I'm bigoted though since I do find it sorta humorous to smash the latest technology in front of the crowd that camped out in line for days prior to some cliche devices release. But that's probably more of a social statement than technological destruction in my mind.

A lot of those expensive cars that get smashed up are really kit car bodies on a more common car's chassis. Smashing up $200,000 Italian exotic cars to make a film adds too much to the budget.

Anonymous Freak
July 6th, 2012, 10:27 AM
Kinda off-topic but worth mentioning anyway...

I was pretty sad when GM ordered the surrender and obliteration of all post-lease EV-1 electric cars. Only a few survived and were donated to museums, universities, etc, with the stipulation they never be driven on public roads. The rationale was liability and I.P. issues.

Not only that, but GM kept the drivetrains. All universities that got them got them without the drivetrain. At least one university made their own drivetrain for driving on-campus.

Maverick1978
July 6th, 2012, 02:36 PM
A lot of those expensive cars that get smashed up are really kit car bodies on a more common car's chassis. Smashing up $200,000 Italian exotic cars to make a film adds too much to the budget.
You'll find that to be the case with 99.9% of cars that are wrecked during the course of a show or movie.

The late-70's and early 80's show Dukes of Hazzard, for instance, smashed up a total of 216 "General Lee" cars during its 6-season run, however all of these were kit cars on a common frame and not the still-relatively-common 1969 Dodge Charger (they used a total of 7 cars as the "show cars" for close shots)

As CGI gets used more and more, we'll see fewer and fewer cars being smashed for entertainment value in movies and television shows. That'll be a good thing for everyone, I think... as much as I personally hate CGI :)

Anonymous Freak
July 6th, 2012, 04:56 PM
A lot of those expensive cars that get smashed up are really kit car bodies on a more common car's chassis. Smashing up $200,000 Italian exotic cars to make a film adds too much to the budget.

Yeah, apparently Ferrari sued the makers of "Ferris Beuller's Day Off" for claiming that the body-kit-car was actually a Ferrari.

themikepeng
July 7th, 2012, 11:51 AM
Agreed

themikepeng
July 7th, 2012, 11:51 AM
It also makes the ones you DON'T have more expensive. :(

Agreed

Mad-Mike
July 7th, 2012, 12:02 PM
Smashing anything functional tends to tick me off, especially if it's old or cool in my eyes. That's why I don't watch those videos unless it's something I don't care much about and/or has some humor to it that makes sense. It's super-stupid to destroy something that still works or can be easily fixed.

Myself, I'm the opposite, I'll occasionally, if I have the time and funds, go out of my way to do something big with something old just to rub it in the face of my peers whom think because something is XX years old it's no longer useful. My car is old, it still works, so I still drive it! My computer is old, it still works, so I still use it! My Lawn Mower is really old, I don't even have a yard, but I landscape my friend's with it, and it costs little to repair when it does break. I have a 25 year old TV Set for classic gaming, I don't have the heart to junk it, because it still works and has a great picture.

As for those smashing new stuff to make a statement, all they are doing is making sensible people laugh because they were so stupid as to spend hundreds on a brand new device just to see a handful of fanboys cry. I'd see a batter way would be to get an old one and keep on using it for roughly a decade.

Smashing cars on TV. That always used to make me upset as I like cars too. I remember coming close to crying the first time I saw BTTF III and saw the DeLorean destroyed by the train, but then I was 8.

DOS lives on!!
July 7th, 2012, 01:31 PM
I'm glad that the "game show" Downfall that ABC made 5 episodes of is gone. Even though all the stuff that was dropped over the edge was a replica of the real product, I couldn't stand seeing old things like the grandfather clock fall off and become little bits and pieces on the pavement below. But at least there wasn't vintage computers getting crushed on that show.

themikepeng
November 22nd, 2012, 06:46 PM
Smashing anything functional tends to tick me off, especially if it's old or cool in my eyes. That's why I don't watch those videos unless it's something I don't care much about and/or has some humor to it that makes sense. It's super-stupid to destroy something that still works or can be easily fixed.

Myself, I'm the opposite, I'll occasionally, if I have the time and funds, go out of my way to do something big with something old just to rub it in the face of my peers whom think because something is XX years old it's no longer useful. My car is old, it still works, so I still drive it! My computer is old, it still works, so I still use it! My Lawn Mower is really old, I don't even have a yard, but I landscape my friend's with it, and it costs little to repair when it does break. I have a 25 year old TV Set for classic gaming, I don't have the heart to junk it, because it still works and has a great picture.

As for those smashing new stuff to make a statement, all they are doing is making sensible people laugh because they were so stupid as to spend hundreds on a brand new device just to see a handful of fanboys cry. I'd see a batter way would be to get an old one and keep on using it for roughly a decade.

Smashing cars on TV. That always used to make me upset as I like cars too. I remember coming close to crying the first time I saw BTTF III and saw the DeLorean destroyed by the train, but then I was 8.

Yes, I can't stand the disposal or destruction of just about anything that works.

themikepeng
November 22nd, 2012, 07:01 PM
In addition to smashing vintage computers, I also despise how people disrespect them. In those internet pictures with a "internet creeper" or a computer nerd, they are always in a dark room, fat, and with a super old computer. They all look to be mostly Pentium II and before, with many original IBM PCs. This makes people think of vintage computers as used by weird people, when they should be thought of as collectible. Also, if you search "crappy computer" on google images, the first few results are just as old. Most people think vintage computers as trash, and although we collectors hate this, we have to accept it.

DOS lives on!!
November 23rd, 2012, 04:51 AM
This one especially. (http://www.webanswers.com/technology-computers/crappy-computer-or-not-crappy-computer-2db0a6)
The newer generation thinks that if it can't connect to the internet or has a floppy drive, then it is woorthless. It's just a sad sign of the times.
And boy when they see it doesn't have a mouse..., it's gotta be from the 40's or 50's.

Compgeke
November 23rd, 2012, 10:55 PM
I had something with floppies, where someone was giving me a bunch of floppies, and my friend asked if I wanted help recycling those...*face desk*. I have a feeling it's the kids that are able to get whatever they want really (as in always have the fastest computer around and such) that don't learn to accept that some of us just want to use the not-latest-and-greatest systems...

bettablue
November 24th, 2012, 08:22 PM
I know this is an old thread that somehow got bumped. Still, I have to add my 2 cents worth. Statements like this hurt the vintage computer industry more than help it. I shudder to think how many vintage computers go through the computer recyclers here in Las Vegas every week. But since Vegas is truly a dead zone for vintage computers it doesn't surprise me. It's this mentality that extracting the gold from these old machines is somehow going to make someone rich that bothers me the most. That just seems to come from those who thing these systems aren't worth keeping for what they are. There are times when a vintage computer should be let go, but not just for the sake of "entertainment" of gold recovery.

(shudders...) There goes another one!




Trust me, that $5 of gold was worth destroying the rest of the system.

generic486
November 24th, 2012, 11:44 PM
I hope you guys are not offended but I usually junk most of my pentium 3 or pentium 4 systems unless they are OEM or quite rare. I keep anything Slot 1 or older. I hate Socket 370 (however, I will keep any Socket 423's I find as they are so rare) . However, this is not destroying them on purpose. I usually try and give them to somebody that want them before sending them to the scrapper. Vintage computers, totally different. I would never ever do anything to destroy a vintage system. For example, think of any c64, huge mass produced. Think of the value and how long that computer has survived with out getting the axe (at least 20 years). I think computers have a patina. They look better when they are older (bar yellowing and other ageing processes) due to the factor it is so strkingly different to any other black box computer you see on the market.

Compgeke
November 25th, 2012, 02:24 AM
Honestly, Pentium 4 towers are more common than people with hair, I frequently find half or full systems for dirt cheap or free, usually Dells as many local businesses spent a lot of money on the GX2x0 series, and unfortunately they're very prone to leaky caps.

bettablue
November 25th, 2012, 09:46 AM
Personally, I wouldn't consider anything in the Pentium 2 on up to be worth anything. I certainly wouldn't think of them as vintage, or collectable, so I wouldn't take offense.

What bothers me is when we see something that is obviously rare, worth a lot of money, is still very collectable and in complete working condition be destroyed or recycled for scrap or worse, put in one of these so called "educational" videos. These videos of people blowing up an IBM 5154 monitor just for fun make me sick! What's even worse is when they show you that it's working, and then proceed to destroy it. AAaarrghhh!!! I have seen this exact example on the web. Gladly, for some reason I'm not able to locate one of those now. Maybe they were pulled after the OPs had their lives threatened.

Back your question though. By the time we got to the P2, P# and so on; there was nothing left to create; nothing unique. Every computer out there now is just another version of the same thing. And, every computer manufacturer is making the same computers as other manufacturers. With that in the front of my mind, I see absolutely nothing that would ever really make them collectable as a vintage computer. Now back in the beginning of the home computer, things were different. Every computer maker had their own vision of what a computer should be; it's shape, whether it was one piece system or had a separate display and or keyboard, or even connected to a television. Everyone had their own "perfect" computer design. And at the very core of the home computer revolution, they all had something that was unique. They all brought something new to the home computer market. Those computers and systems are what I consider vintage and collectable. Others will undoubtedly have their own definition, but I think we would all agree on the concept of what is truly vintage, and collectable.

I'll get off my pulpit now.


I hope you guys are not offended but I usually junk most of my pentium 3 or pentium 4 systems unless they are OEM or quite rare. I keep anything Slot 1 or older. I hate Socket 370 (however, I will keep any Socket 423's I find as they are so rare) . However, this is not destroying them on purpose. I usually try and give them to somebody that want them before sending them to the scrapper. Vintage computers, totally different. I would never ever do anything to destroy a vintage system. For example, think of any c64, huge mass produced. Think of the value and how long that computer has survived with out getting the axe (at least 20 years). I think computers have a patina. They look better when they are older (bar yellowing and other ageing processes) due to the factor it is so strkingly different to any other black box computer you see on the market.

themikepeng
December 10th, 2012, 06:43 PM
I hope you guys are not offended but I usually junk most of my pentium 3 or pentium 4 systems unless they are OEM or quite rare. I keep anything Slot 1 or older. I hate Socket 370 (however, I will keep any Socket 423's I find as they are so rare) . However, this is not destroying them on purpose. I usually try and give them to somebody that want them before sending them to the scrapper. Vintage computers, totally different. I would never ever do anything to destroy a vintage system. For example, think of any c64, huge mass produced. Think of the value and how long that computer has survived with out getting the axe (at least 20 years). I think computers have a patina. They look better when they are older (bar yellowing and other ageing processes) due to the factor it is so strkingly different to any other black box computer you see on the market.

Same here, sort of. I don't exactly trash p3 systems, but I have sort of grown out of them and into 486 and before.

themikepeng
December 10th, 2012, 06:58 PM
Honestly, Pentium 4 towers are more common than people with hair, I frequently find half or full systems for dirt cheap or free, usually Dells as many local businesses spent a lot of money on the GX2x0 series, and unfortunately they're very prone to leaky caps.

I agree, on my craigslist there are no Pentium 3 or before, and thousands of Pentium 4's. Mostly Dells.

ppgrainbow
December 10th, 2012, 08:18 PM
I agree. I recently got rid of all of my games and I'm on the verge of losing the GRiD Convertible 486 pentop computer. The pentop computer hasn't been working correctly, because the batteries don't hold a charge anymore and the CMOS battery has been dead since I got it. If in any event there is a need to get rid of the GRiD 2270, I will most likely have to find ways to at least salvage the 1.35 GB Toshiba hard drive. :(

Mad-Mike
December 11th, 2012, 05:32 PM
The more I read this thread, the more it makes me think of how I got into Vintage Computing in the first place......the general attitudes of non-vintage-computer people. This whole "it's too old, too slow, wastes too much time.."

It was 2001, I wanted a PC with internet access and the ability to play games like Monkey Island and Ultima. That's it... just a $10.00 cobbled together 486 with a $15 a month ISP Bill! Buuuuuuuuuut...every person who could help snagged me on the way...

Computer Shop in Opelika
Salesguy: "No, we won't help you with your 486, but we do have a special on a Compaq Presario for $1,999.99"
Me: "But I can't AFFORD $1,999.99"
Salesguy: "Well.....CON your parents into it"
(yes, I kid you not, he expected a 16 year old to con his single mother into buying a $2000.00 computer).

Next Computer Shop
Me: "Do you have parts for 486 computer"
Guy on Phone: "CLICK"

There was the Guy who was a friend of our band....
Guy: "A 486? WTH? Dude, you could get a second hand Athlon for $200, besides, it's too old and slow to do anything "fun"....just save yourself the hassle. Besides, it's too slow to get on the internet and has not enough RAM to be fast enough for it to be enjoyable, maybe you should just trash it and buy a new one"

Me: "You know what F***er, I WILL get that "old piece of crap" on the internet, and do it in style"....

The funnier part is 10 years ago, I even had VINTAGE COMPUTER people asking why I'd bother with a "generic PC"....back then, 486s were a dime a dozen, as was pretty much anything else based on the IBM PC. Now you're hard pressed to find anything like that under $50.00 unless you live somewhere where the population is a little more computer-illiterate than usual, they either have all been destroyed, bought up by retro-gamers, or collectors, or belong to some old coot who thinks he will get a full 100% refund on his old Cactus Tower he bought for his basketweaving business in 1990.

The greatest part is, I can say "I told you so" to many of the people who were roadblocks in my development, 10 years ago, I was saying to people around me that these old DOSboxen would gain some value...and guess what, they did. They all laughed, funny part is, some of them are NOW looking for those "old pieces of crap" to relive their adolescent years of playing DOOM and listening to Nirvana on CD through the Soundblaster card, and grumping because they're gone. Hmm....maybe they should'nt have set that old PS/2 in the bonfire 10 years ago!

raifield
December 12th, 2012, 04:12 PM
I feel the same way you do Mad-Mike. While I set a personal policy of not purchasing a vintage computer that DOSBox could emulate (386 and up), I finally settled on an IBM PS/2 Model 25 after going through various old 286 and 8088 based systems. The all-in-one style is, in IBM's special way, weird and clunky, but I like it. Now I entertain myself programming for the 8087 in Borland's Turbo Basic, conducting performance experiments to my own curiosity. So far my best program was "X=1*1.000001" repeated a million times. In IBM BASICA, it took forty-nine and a half minutes. In Borland's Turbo Basic, it took 2 minutes and 32 seconds. I'd like to try it on my Atari 800XL, but I'm not sure if my wife would let me leave the TV on for the day(s) it would take to finish!

Things like this are why I enjoy vintage computing. Today every computer is pretty much identical to the next. I was born too late to experience the 80's vast quantity of different computers, but it must have been a pretty interesting time.

themikepeng
December 14th, 2012, 07:47 AM
I guess another big factor in the loss of vintage computers could be Y2K. But that was 12 years ago and probably didn't have anything to do with today's crazed teenagers that own hammers.

SmallWars
March 3rd, 2013, 07:58 PM
Yes, and you're thinking, "that's history being destroyed right there...how do you find joy in this?!?!"

Smack2k
March 6th, 2013, 03:24 PM
Someone mentioned that some people see things and dont care, while others see the same thing and go nuts (the vintage cars being trashed)...that cant be any more true!!

I know for me, up until 6 or 7 months ago, seeing an old computer get destroyed wouldnt have done much for me in terms of caring..but now I see it (since I have become completely absorbed by this hobby) and think "NO, dont do that...what's in that box..anything salvageable? At least the case can be saved if nothing else!" Before that, when I was really collecting professional wrestling videos, I'd read a post about so and so throwing out all their videos years before and have the same reaction "NO..how could you do that, are you CRAZY?" So its funny to see it from both sides. Those that are destroying those machines see them as the same vintage cars we see in movies getting destroyed and think "that was a great collision or wreck"....just another victim kid!!

This is also why I ask ANYONE I know, work with or know through someone else if they have or know people that have older computer equipment they dont want...most of the replies are "Why do you want that?" But if I get a yes here and there and can grab some of this stuff before it rots in a garage or goes in the trash, score a point for me! The thought of a perfect IBM 5160 sitting somewhere within reach in a safe place (as one example) but un-wanted is what drives me to keep asking everyone!

bettablue
March 6th, 2013, 07:58 PM
I know exactly what you mean Smack2k. I hate to see any kind of collectable being destroyed for the sake of entertainment, education, or whatever the reason. All they've done is taken something that may be worth saving, and removing any chance that it will ever be used again. For us, that would primarily involve vintage computers. I'm also like you too. I hate seeing vintage cars demolished to make a movie more exciting. I hate to see any collectable mistreated in any way.

themikepeng
April 25th, 2013, 07:04 PM
The more I read this thread, the more it makes me think of how I got into Vintage Computing in the first place......the general attitudes of non-vintage-computer people. This whole "it's too old, too slow, wastes too much time.."

It was 2001, I wanted a PC with internet access and the ability to play games like Monkey Island and Ultima. That's it... just a $10.00 cobbled together 486 with a $15 a month ISP Bill! Buuuuuuuuuut...every person who could help snagged me on the way...

Computer Shop in Opelika
Salesguy: "No, we won't help you with your 486, but we do have a special on a Compaq Presario for $1,999.99"
Me: "But I can't AFFORD $1,999.99"
Salesguy: "Well.....CON your parents into it"
(yes, I kid you not, he expected a 16 year old to con his single mother into buying a $2000.00 computer).

Next Computer Shop
Me: "Do you have parts for 486 computer"
Guy on Phone: "CLICK"

There was the Guy who was a friend of our band....
Guy: "A 486? WTH? Dude, you could get a second hand Athlon for $200, besides, it's too old and slow to do anything "fun"....just save yourself the hassle. Besides, it's too slow to get on the internet and has not enough RAM to be fast enough for it to be enjoyable, maybe you should just trash it and buy a new one"

Me: "You know what F***er, I WILL get that "old piece of crap" on the internet, and do it in style"....

The funnier part is 10 years ago, I even had VINTAGE COMPUTER people asking why I'd bother with a "generic PC"....back then, 486s were a dime a dozen, as was pretty much anything else based on the IBM PC. Now you're hard pressed to find anything like that under $50.00 unless you live somewhere where the population is a little more computer-illiterate than usual, they either have all been destroyed, bought up by retro-gamers, or collectors, or belong to some old coot who thinks he will get a full 100% refund on his old Cactus Tower he bought for his basketweaving business in 1990.

The greatest part is, I can say "I told you so" to many of the people who were roadblocks in my development, 10 years ago, I was saying to people around me that these old DOSboxen would gain some value...and guess what, they did. They all laughed, funny part is, some of them are NOW looking for those "old pieces of crap" to relive their adolescent years of playing DOOM and listening to Nirvana on CD through the Soundblaster card, and grumping because they're gone. Hmm....maybe they should'nt have set that old PS/2 in the bonfire 10 years ago!

Nice. You really showed them. Sort of like how right now Pentium 3/4 computers are everywhere, and I'm trying to challenge myself by living off $50 Windows 2000. I hope Pentium 2/3/4 will be as valuable as 486s in 10 or something years. BTW you will not believe how hard it was for me to get a 486 computer.

themikepeng
April 25th, 2013, 07:12 PM
Someone mentioned that some people see things and dont care, while others see the same thing and go nuts (the vintage cars being trashed)...that cant be any more true!!

I know for me, up until 6 or 7 months ago, seeing an old computer get destroyed wouldnt have done much for me in terms of caring..but now I see it (since I have become completely absorbed by this hobby) and think "NO, dont do that...what's in that box..anything salvageable? At least the case can be saved if nothing else!" Before that, when I was really collecting professional wrestling videos, I'd read a post about so and so throwing out all their videos years before and have the same reaction "NO..how could you do that, are you CRAZY?" So its funny to see it from both sides. Those that are destroying those machines see them as the same vintage cars we see in movies getting destroyed and think "that was a great collision or wreck"....just another victim kid!!

This is also why I ask ANYONE I know, work with or know through someone else if they have or know people that have older computer equipment they dont want...most of the replies are "Why do you want that?" But if I get a yes here and there and can grab some of this stuff before it rots in a garage or goes in the trash, score a point for me! The thought of a perfect IBM 5160 sitting somewhere within reach in a safe place (as one example) but un-wanted is what drives me to keep asking everyone!

Me too, I used to not care about anything being smashed. In fact I have to admit I probably laughed at some of the videos before the hobby. And I hate it even more when they don't salvage anything, especially the hard drives, because now there's like a 1/4 chance a vintage computer comes with a hard drive. When they smash it and I see all the hard drives, floppy drives, memory chips, expansion cards etc. fly out in pieces, I just have to scream in agony.

Caluser2000
April 25th, 2013, 11:56 PM
Nice. You really showed them. Sort of like how right now Pentium 3/4 computers are everywhere, and I'm trying to challenge myself by living off $50 Windows 2000. I shouldn't imagine it would be too traumatic. I'm usually a few generations behind the current offerings. All my XP boxen have been free. Now that I think about it so were my last 386 and 486 scores.