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View Full Version : Vintage Computer Festival East This Saturday!



vbriel
May 9th, 2006, 03:46 AM
I'll be there with my prototype AltairPC and the new replica 1 SE, hope to see you there. Replica 1 to be given away at the show! Visit the VCF website for more info:

http://www.vintage.org

See you there,

Vince

billdeg
May 9th, 2006, 04:24 AM
I will be there too...my exhibit will consist of B Series Commodores including a working X model (8088 co-processor). At least it was working last week! Those are finicky buggers.

tgunner
May 9th, 2006, 04:40 AM
I'll be there! :D

80sFreak
May 9th, 2006, 05:04 AM
I look forward to seeing any Commodore stuff.. :) (Well, maybe except for the Colt) ;)

Cheers,

80sFreak

vbriel
May 9th, 2006, 09:49 AM
I hope I get the chance to see everybody's display. This should be a nice show. The pressure is on Evan!

Vince

kb2syd
May 9th, 2006, 12:17 PM
I'll be there with a bunch of Tandy/Radio Shacks and a few pretty pictures.

alexkerhead
May 9th, 2006, 01:37 PM
You guys make me wish I had accepted Evan's offer to go. I just don't have the money to get there, especially with 20 computers. Hopefully I can go with all my stuff next year.

tgunner
May 9th, 2006, 05:41 PM
Did you all buy booths? Or is there like a general display section?

Computer Collector
May 9th, 2006, 05:56 PM
Does This Happen At The Same Time Every Year? Maybe I Can Go Next Year

Erik
May 9th, 2006, 06:10 PM
Does This Happen At The Same Time Every Year? Maybe I Can Go Next Year

Pretty much. There are actually 3 shows in the US and at least one in Europe. The VCF Midwest was just announced as well:



Announcing:
************************************************** ***
*
* VCF / Midwest 2.0 "Lite"
*
* Saturday, July 15
* Purdue University: West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
*
************************************************** ***
Purdue's IEEE Computer Society will be sponsoring the second annual
Midwest-area Vintage Computer Festival on July 15th. We are currently
looking for people who want to exhibit, and potential speakers for the
event. If you want to do either, or know someone who might, please have
them get in contact with us at vcfmw at computer-refuge.org. Also, if
you are planning on attending, please send mail, so we can get a rough
attendance count.
More information on the event and the West Lafayette area are posted up
at: http://www.vintage.org/2006/midwest/ (http://www.vintage.org/2006/midwest/)
If you have any questions, contact me at vcvmw at computer-refuge.org.
Back now to your regularly scheduled programming.
Pat
--
Purdue University ITAP/RCAC --- http://www.rcac.purdue.edu/ (http://www.rcac.purdue.edu/)
The Computer Refuge --- http://computer-refuge.org (http://computer-refuge.org/)


The West Coast VCF should end up in the October timeframe, give or take.

ahm
May 9th, 2006, 06:19 PM
Hopefully I can go with all my stuff next year.
The point isn't to bring everything you own, but rather to come up with a theme or to showcase something in particular.
For example, I'll be there with a couple of Atari systems.
I'm pretty sure we all bought tables.

Starshadow
May 9th, 2006, 06:20 PM
(Well, maybe except for the Colt)

hey whats wrong with the Colt? They're more rare than the 64 and the Vic-20 around these parts.

alexkerhead
May 9th, 2006, 07:48 PM
The point isn't to bring everything you own, but rather to come up with a theme or to showcase something in particular.
For example, I'll be there with a couple of Atari systems.
I'm pretty sure we all bought tables.
Problem is, there turns out to be too much of the same thing.
If your teory was valid, then all I would bring was my set of compaq portables, or my commodores, or something. But I believe it would work better to have a bulk variety. I don't really like seeing a 10x8ft booth with a single table and two or three units, very lame.
If there is a nice variety, then there is more to look at. When my friends and I goto a computer show, or something, we cannot stand acting interested towards a small display. It may appear neat, and win some kind of asthetics award, but the viewers aren't truely interested.
You may want to take more than "a couple of Atari systems"
Maybe my friends and I are wierd and we don't know what the general public would prefer, but I just felt like expressing my opinion about skimpy displays.

EvanK
May 9th, 2006, 08:48 PM
Tgunner and Computer Collector --

TG: There isn't a 'general display' section. Everyone buys a booth. The prices vary from VCF to VCF depending on the venue and who's running it (the VCF franchise itself is owned by Sellam Ismail of VintageTech, who also runs the main show every fall in California. He endorses various people to organize the regional editions.) So for example, at the East 3.0 event this weekend, we priced the booths starting at $20.

CC: The dates are fairly consistent. The main VCF is held in early November at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California. East is traditionally a spring or summer event -- it used to be in Boston and now it's in New Jersey. Midwest and Europa are also summer events in Indiana (so far) and Munich, respectively.

- Evan

EvanK
May 9th, 2006, 08:51 PM
The point isn't to bring everything you own, but rather to come up with a theme or to showcase something in particular.
For example, I'll be there with a couple of Atari systems.
I'm pretty sure we all bought tables.

Exactly. Alexh, it's important to understand that VCF is basically analogous to an antique car show -- it's an "exhibit" not a "swap meet". So the exhibitors all bring their most pristine items, centered around a theme. Visit here http://www.vintage.org/2006/east/exhibit.php to see what we mean.

EvanK
May 9th, 2006, 08:57 PM
Problem is, there turns out to be too much of the same thing. ....... You may want to take more than "a couple of Atari systems"
Maybe my friends and I are wierd and we don't know what the general public would prefer, but I just felt like expressing my opinion about skimpy displays.

Okay, let me elaborate...

AHM did not mean is just throwing a couple random Atari systems on a table.

Instead, the exhibitors go to great lengths to prepare entire historic displays. For example, BillDeg is focusing on Commodore's B-series computers. In addition to the actual computers being demonstrated (vs. just sitting there), he'll also have a wide variety of posters, signs, research information, etc. to explain the systems in a unique context that most people haven't heard before.

Erik: you're a veteran VCF exhibitor and obviously you have a different perspective than I. Perhaps you can explain this better than I can. Talk about your Kenbak exhibit last year.

Alexh: no one is attacking your opinion, we're just trying to explain what a VCF is like. As for variety, well, our East 3.0 version this weekend has 17 (possibly 18 ) exhibitors, only two of which are doing similar topics. And even within the individual exhibits there is great variety. For example, Jim O'Brien is showing an amazing variety of Apple computers, and Kelly Leavitt is showing a Tandy timeline. Mike Ross is bringing three different IBM minicomputers -- and that's just three exhibitors. If any one does bring a skimpy display, trust me, they'll feel very out of place. (I learned this lesson the hard way. My first VCF was the 6.0 event is California in 2003. My display sucked. I has to miss the '04 event, but I returned last year with a much more elaborate display that fit right in. Ask Erik, he was next to me in the hall.

alexkerhead
May 9th, 2006, 09:11 PM
I see what you are saying Evan. I have just seen entirely too many exhibits at different shows that were just, excuse the word, "lame".
A couple b series ataris might be sweet to an atari person, but not many people are just atari people. I can understand an exhibit like maybe "portables of 1983" would be sweet, and display all their portables from the certain year, but I wouldn't be too interested myself in an exhibit with just a couple units with extensive information, because even if it is two units, I couldn't possibly remember everything he had posted up, but I could learn a little bit of useful information about a lot of different units.
Remember when I talked to you about it, I was contimplating having three tables, one for compaq portables, one for early commodores, and one for early laptops.
I think that would attract a mess load of viewers compared to if I just braught a couple of commodores and had 15 info posters about them.
Then again, vcf has been very successful, and I am probably just alone in my assumptions.

EvanK
May 9th, 2006, 09:36 PM
Another cool aspect of a VCF is that people don't just show up, do one lap of the exhibits, and leave. People tend to do several laps, listen to a few lectures, spend lots of time mingling and chatting with their fellow collectors, and maybe even win a prize. Sure, AHM is doing Atari computer, but he's interested in plenty of other topics from slots cars to Linux. So you'd start talking with him about Atari computers and the next thing you know, you're making a connection with his friend's cousin's roommate about some technology of greater interest to you.

In other words, the most exciting thing about a VCF is the people, not the computers! East 3.0 will be my fourth one and each time my favorite part is just hanging out with the collectors that we know from sites like this one and classiccmp, and also meeting new collectors. At my first one in 2003, as soon as I was there fore 10 minutes, I was thinking, "Wow, this is great! A whole show of just collectors. Where have these people been all my life?" ... okay maybe that's a slight embellishment but you get the idea.

VCFs also usually have special events such as the Nerd Trivia Challenge or the Retro Coding Contest. We're not doing those events at East 3.0 because of resources, however, this is the first time a VCF is being held at a historic venue. So if there's enough interest then we will run some tours of the venue itself.

80sFreak
May 10th, 2006, 05:12 AM
hey whats wrong with the Colt? They're more rare than the 64 and the Vic-20 around these parts.

When they came out it seemed like Commodore was just trying to jump on the IBM clone bandwagon and took away resources from their Amiga line. One reason they may be rare now is because they were slow and expensive compared to what was already out there. Maybe if Commodore had spent the money wasted on developing the Colt on figuring out how to market their Amiga they would have done a little better with it!

Cheers,

80sFreak

Erik
May 10th, 2006, 06:35 AM
I've posted pictures of several past VCFs on my site at www.vintage-computer.com/events (http://www.vintage-computer.com/events)

You should be able to get a feel for what works and what doesn't from that. . . :)

Terry Yager
May 10th, 2006, 06:20 PM
Wow! I didn't know they had a VCF that close to me. I might even be able to make it to one soon (this year?). What city is Perdue in, anyways?

--T

EvanK
May 10th, 2006, 07:52 PM
It says the city right on the homepage at http://www.purdue.edu ... duh.

ahm
May 10th, 2006, 09:51 PM
A couple b series ataris might be sweet to an atari person, but not many people are just atari people.
Then it's a good thing I'm not just an Atari person either. I grew up with an Apple ][+, owned an early Mac, then a Tandy Model 16 running Xenix. I've got expertise in CP/M and some older Unix systems like the 3B2.

I probably would have displayed something else entirely at VCF. But a year ago, a bunch of us got together and created a room full of displays at the Trenton Computer Festival. We had all the popular manufacturers represented - except Atari. Not long after that, someone gave me an Atari; then another from someone else and another. I mean, if people just keep giving me stuff, why not put it on display? I could just as easily have decided to show CP/M machines at VCF.

And you know, I almost don't care what anyone thinks about my display. I expect to have a good time, meeting other people, checking out their stuff and just totally geeking out for a full day. I'd like to meet David Ahl, whose magazine _Creative Computing_ had a huge influence on me when I first started getting into computers. His talk should be excellent.

alexkerhead
May 10th, 2006, 10:30 PM
Then it's a good thing I'm not just an Atari person either. I grew up with an Apple ][+, owned an early Mac, then a Tandy Model 16 running Xenix. I've got expertise in CP/M and some older Unix systems like the 3B2.

I probably would have displayed something else entirely at VCF. But a year ago, a bunch of us got together and created a room full of displays at the Trenton Computer Festival. We had all the popular manufacturers represented - except Atari. Not long after that, someone gave me an Atari; then another from someone else and another. I mean, if people just keep giving me stuff, why not put it on display? I could just as easily have decided to show CP/M machines at VCF.

And you know, I almost don't care what anyone thinks about my display. I expect to have a good time, meeting other people, checking out their stuff and just totally geeking out for a full day. I'd like to meet David Ahl, whose magazine _Creative Computing_ had a huge influence on me when I first started getting into computers. His talk should be excellent.

I wasn't attacking you personally. I was just expressing a misconceeded opinion. See, I have never been to a vintage computer show, because of my location. For this reason, I don't totally understand all of the nuances concerning the art of displaying vintage computing gear. Forgive me if I offended you in any way, shape, or form. The images Erik linked to helped better my understanding of this situation. I do look forward to when the work/school/money situation subsides enough for me to travel to a vintage computer festival.

Terry Yager
May 11th, 2006, 08:33 AM
It says the city right on the homepage at http://www.purdue.edu ... duh.

Yeah, I found it after taking another look. Tnx.

--T

ahm
May 11th, 2006, 03:25 PM
I wasn't attacking you personally.
No offense taken.

I was just expressing a misconceeded opinion.
A what now? http://m-w.com/dictionary/misconceeded

I do look forward to when the work/school/money situation subsides enough for me to travel to a vintage computer festival.
We'd be glad to have you come by and say "hey". :-)

Terry Yager
May 11th, 2006, 04:35 PM
Misconcieved, perhaps...?

--T

carlsson
May 12th, 2006, 01:00 PM
On the topic of retro convents, the small one we're planning to have in two weeks nearby where I live are a bit worried that the power distribution (one or more 10A?) will not be enough for everyone having a booth - at this moment estimated to about 10 people. One suggestion was to have a table with TVs and monitors, and then when you want to make a presentation, move over with your gear to that table and show it. Otherwise leave it turned off at your own table. Several of those people I've met recently think boxed items are the most pristine, and may not even open the boxes to display the actual computers/video games. To me I feel a bit disappointed if it takes this direction, but I agree that everyone don't need to have their gear turned on all the time if there is noone else to watch it at the moment. Moving stuff around - computers, perhaps disk drives, software in various media and who knows what - sounds semi-productive.

Does anyone have experience of a such small expo, and how did you do it? This one will be hosted in a rented room in an apartment building. The event will take place from Friday afternoon to Sunday noon, and is expected to attract somewhere around 15-20 up to maybe 50 visitors, depending on media coverage etc.

Starshadow
May 12th, 2006, 09:56 PM
for me that Pic of the eMate on top of a Lisa is just cruel! Its the Computer and the PDA I want the most in one Pic!