PDA

View Full Version : Creating Mac OS disk images using a modern Mac running OS X 10.x PPC or Intel systems



Chromedome45
August 21st, 2012, 06:57 AM
Creating disk images using Mac OSX and Terminal commands.

Sample useage: At the command line, enter dd if=INPUTFILE of=OUTPUTFILE bs=84 skip=1 and hit Enter.

Heres' how you do it!
Using a USB floppy drive plug into any USB port. Insert the blank disk you want to use.

Open Disk Utility (it's in the Utilities folder, which is in the Applications folder). You'll see the floppy drive on the left hand pane in Disk Utility. Click on the lower level (the piece whose name matches the icon mounted on the desktop) of the floppy and choose Unmount from the toolbar. Once this is done, the name of the volume will be greyed out.

Select the top level of the floppy disk and click the Info button on the toolbar. Make a note of the 'disk identifier', which will be something like 'disk1'. This determines what you will enter for OUTPUTFILE (if it says disk2, you'll enter /dev/disk2).

Create a folder on your desktop and name it Images

Copy your old Mac disk images from a USB drive or other media to the Images folder.

Note these need to be .img or .dsk images only. No .sea or .bin types.

Start Terminal located in the Utilities folder.

Using the CD command in terminal change directory to CD /Desktop CD Images

Next you'll enter the command: dd if=filename.img of=/dev/disk2 bs=84 skip=1

Wait for it to finish and you have a good disk image ready for use on your classic
Mac system.

I have tried this on a G3 clamshell using OSX 10.3 and it works fines as well as an Intel Macbook running OSX 10.7.4 Lion.

RWallmow
August 22nd, 2012, 03:52 AM
Creating disk images using Mac OSX and Terminal commands.

Sample useage: At the command line, enter dd if=INPUTFILE of=OUTPUTFILE bs=84 skip=1 and hit Enter.

Heres' how you do it!
Using a USB floppy drive plug into any USB port. Insert the blank disk you want to use.

Open Disk Utility (it's in the Utilities folder, which is in the Applications folder). You'll see the floppy drive on the left hand pane in Disk Utility. Click on the lower level (the piece whose name matches the icon mounted on the desktop) of the floppy and choose Unmount from the toolbar. Once this is done, the name of the volume will be greyed out.

Select the top level of the floppy disk and click the Info button on the toolbar. Make a note of the 'disk identifier', which will be something like 'disk1'. This determines what you will enter for OUTPUTFILE (if it says disk2, you'll enter /dev/disk2).

Create a folder on your desktop and name it Images

Copy your old Mac disk images from a USB drive or other media to the Images folder.

Note these need to be .img or .dsk images only. No .sea or .bin types.

Start Terminal located in the Utilities folder.

Using the CD command in terminal change directory to CD /Desktop CD Images

Next you'll enter the command: dd if=filename.img of=/dev/disk2 bs=84 skip=1

Wait for it to finish and you have a good disk image ready for use on your classic
Mac system.

I have tried this on a G3 clamshell using OSX 10.3 and it works fines as well as an Intel Macbook running OSX 10.7.4 Lion.
It should be noted this would only work for 1.44mb images, you cannot make 800kb floppy images from anything but a Mac with an INTERNAL floppy drive on "SWIM" chip (the beige G3, and I believe Kanga or Wallstreet G3 powerbooks were the last to have one) and "Classic" MacOS (OSX dropped support for SWIM floppy controller, though there is an unsupported SWIM driver for OSX (http://www.darwin-development.org/floppy/), but I don't believe it supports 800k either).

Chromedome45
August 22nd, 2012, 05:15 AM
It should be noted this would only work for 1.44mb images, you cannot make 800kb floppy images from anything but a Mac with an INTERNAL floppy drive on "SWIM" chip (the beige G3, and I believe Kanga or Wallstreet G3 powerbooks were the last to have one) and "Classic" MacOS (OSX dropped support for SWIM floppy controller, though there is an unsupported SWIM driver for OSX (http://www.darwin-development.org/floppy/), but I don't believe it supports 800k either).

Incorrect sir, I made up some 800k OS 6.0.8 disks and they booted and worked fine. Try it and see!

RWallmow
August 22nd, 2012, 05:29 AM
Incorrect sir, I made up some 800k OS 6.0.8 disks and they booted and worked fine. Try it and see!
I would really like to know how that is possible? What model floppy drive do you use? I have NEVER seen a USB drive that supported GCR encoding, every USB drive I have seen is only MFM encoding.

EDIT: If you have found a USB drive that supports GCR encoding, this would be great, that would mean I could write vintage Mac/Apple II disk images right from a modern machine without having to use my G3 as a "tweener" system.

Chromedome45
August 22nd, 2012, 07:17 AM
It's an IBM Branded Teac fd-05B black in color. I was also gonna try it on another one of my USB drives. I'll keep you advised. Maybe it's the way the Images were craeted? I don't know.

Chuck(G)
August 22nd, 2012, 07:54 AM
That FD05 is pretty plain--it will handle standard DOS-type images (9x512, 18x512) and NEC images (10x1024). Apple GCR is a very different animal and there's no way an FD05 can handle it.

Perhaps you're not familiar with Apple GCR?

RWallmow
August 22nd, 2012, 07:59 AM
It's an IBM Branded Teac fd-05B black in color. I was also gonna try it on another one of my USB drives. I'll keep you advised. Maybe it's the way the Images were craeted? I don't know.

Are you writing these images over to HD floppies? Maybe somehow its reformatting the image as a 1.44 MFM and writting it out like that, which if the Mac you are booting has a 1.44 capable drive, would probably read/boot.

I would be curious to see this tried on a DD floppy, trying to boot it on a 800k only Mac (SE, without Superdrive upgrade, or older).

RWallmow
August 22nd, 2012, 08:02 AM
Are you writing these images over to HD floppies? Maybe somehow its reformatting the image as a 1.44 MFM and writting it out like that, which if the Mac you are booting has a 1.44 capable drive, would probably read/boot.
.

I see you said these were 6.0.8 images, 6.0.8 did come on 1.44 MFM as well, so maybe you were writing those by mistake?

Chromedome45
August 22nd, 2012, 08:30 AM
On system 6.0.0 which disk is bootable? I have a Superdrive in my SE.

Chromedome45
August 22nd, 2012, 08:38 AM
Are you writing these images over to HD floppies? Maybe somehow its reformatting the image as a 1.44 MFM and writting it out like that, which if the Mac you are booting has a 1.44 capable drive, would probably read/boot.

I would be curious to see this tried on a DD floppy, trying to boot it on a 800k only Mac (SE, without Superdrive upgrade, or older).

I think your right the 800k disks will not boot my mistake and apologies. Boots 1.44 images fine though! Oh well thought I was on to something :(

Ok folks only works with 1.44MB images!

RWallmow
August 22nd, 2012, 09:14 AM
I think your right the 800k disks will not boot my mistake and apologies. Boots 1.44 images fine though! Oh well thought I was on to something :(

Ok folks only works with 1.44MB images!

That's what I thought, though I was REALLY hoping you had found a USB drive that worked with GCR format.

To my knowledge the only USB solution to GCR disks is the FC5025 (http://www.deviceside.com/fc5025.html), and it only READS, and then only 5.25" media, using a Specific Teac drive mechanism. Its purpose seems to be archival of old disks, no thought to being able to WRITE disks for use on old machines.

Alternatively there is also the CatWeasel (http://www.jschoenfeld.com/products/catweasel_e.htm), however that is an ISA or PCI solution, so probably rules out Mac users (at least modern ones, do any Macs have PCI anymore?), but could be of use to PC users wanting to work with GCR and other now obscure disks.

Chuck(G)
August 22nd, 2012, 09:26 AM
I keep an old Beige G3 around for handling 800K floppies, but I can boot OS X 10.4 using XpostFacto. Did anyone ever come out with a driver to use the G3's internal drive under OS X?

RWallmow
August 22nd, 2012, 09:46 AM
I keep an old Beige G3 around for handling 800K floppies, but I can boot OS X 10.4 using XpostFacto. Did anyone ever come out with a driver to use the G3's internal drive under OS X?

Yeah, I have a beige G3 for 800k disks too, since thats about all I use it for I just run OS9 on it.

There is the driver over at http://www.darwin-development.org/floppy/ for OSX support of the floppy, however I don't believe it supports GCR, and its buggy and slow.

Chromedome45
August 23rd, 2012, 03:40 AM
I think that the 800k images on 1.44 media were what was booting. So I guess this won't work with SE and Plus's with 800 k drives? I have no way of testing

RWallmow
August 23rd, 2012, 04:15 AM
I think that the 800k images on 1.44 media were what was booting. So I guess this won't work with SE and Plus's with 800 k drives? I have no way of testing

800k Mac disks have always been kind of a pain, I ended up upgrading my main 800k SE to a 1.44 drive/motherboard so I wouldn't have to deal with the 800k disks on it anymore on it. But I do still need to use them from time to time, I have a Plus and my IIgs which only read 800k (however I have SCSI Jaz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iomega_Jaz_drive)drives on those, so even those don't use 800k all that often). Boot Disks/OS installs are about the only reason I need to use 800k disks these days.

Chromedome45
August 23rd, 2012, 04:37 AM
Guess I'll have to keep my Performa around as a tweener as well. Well I was really hoping that would work with OS X!