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View Full Version : My Atari 400 on YouTube



tezza
December 7th, 2012, 03:29 PM
Just announcing this here in case any Atari enthusiasts might be interested.
http://youtu.be/puZeSzrQFpk

Tez

DoctorPepper
December 8th, 2012, 04:26 AM
Good video tezza, my wife and I especially enjoyed the humor you injected into it at different points.

I never had any contact with the Atari 400 or 800. My only Atari experience was with the 2600. I'm glad you and others are taking the time to create these videos, so that younger generations can see what we used in the wild and woolly days of early home computing.

Vint
December 8th, 2012, 06:44 AM
Another of my favorite machines. Which is odd, since I never owned a 400. Not for lack of pursuing, though. I think I've bid on more Atari 400's on eBay, than on any other vintage computer. I just don't value the machine as highly as some others do - but I've always admired it's classic styling. I've had the 2600, the 600 & 800XL's but never a 400 or 800, and that's where I'm a little torn - I'd really rather have an 800 over the 400, but alas, they are out of my reach money wise. They always seem to go for a fairly premium price when in great condition. I especially like the RAM & ROM modules that fit in the top of the 800. There are so many of the machines in your collection I'm looking forward to watching your videos about. Some of those machines I have, others I wish I had. Your collection consists of so many of the machines I also admire.

vwestlife
December 8th, 2012, 09:34 AM
The 400 and 800 were very solidly built computers, and far ahead of their time. They were both expensive to manufacture, too, containing extensive metal shielding, numerous circuit boards, and even an internal speaker just for the purpose of producing the keyboard click and buzzer sound.

This is part of what contributed to Atari's financial problems under Warner -- the 400 and 800 remained under high demand, but Atari just couldn't make them cheap enough to compete with the new computers coming on the market around 1982-1983. That's what led to the XL series, which were less expensive to manufacture, using a simpler case design containing only one main circuit board, and the FCC rule changes in 1981 now allowed them to use an internal RF modulator without needing a "fortress" of thick metal shielding surrounding the computer's circuitry!

tezza
December 8th, 2012, 02:28 PM
... I'm glad you and others are taking the time to create these videos, so that younger generations can see what we used in the wild and woolly days of early home computing.

Thanks for the positive feedback,

Yes that's the idea. The computing experience of younger people (with tablets, smartphones etc.) is quite different from my experience as a young adult when these machines started to come onto the market. Hopefully people (young and old) who aren't familiar with these computers can get some sense of (1) what they were like, (2) where they fitted in the general scheme of things and (2) the support and culture around them.

Tez

tezza
December 8th, 2012, 02:36 PM
I'd really rather have an 800 over the 400, but alas, they are out of my reach money wise. They always seem to go for a fairly premium price when in great condition.

Yes, I'd LOVE an 800. They are rarer than hen's wisdom teeth down here though!


There are so many of the machines in your collection I'm looking forward to watching your videos about. Some of those machines I have, others I wish I had. Your collection consists of so many of the machines I also admire.

Thanks Vint. I've tried to acquire machines that have some noteworthiness although there are some there that are just for my own personal nostalgia (like the Colour Genie for example). I still want a Mac 128 and a Jupiter Ace. A Mac 128 (not working) recently sold here in NZ for over $1000 (about $830 US). I put in a bid of $740 NZ but it wasn't enough. I think I'm going to have to be prepared to pay a bit more, just to get those few remaining models I want.

Anyway, next video will be the Osborne 1.

Tez

tezza
December 8th, 2012, 02:42 PM
The 400 and 800 were very solidly built computers, and far ahead of their time. They were both expensive to manufacture, too, containing extensive metal shielding, numerous circuit boards, and even an internal speaker just for the purpose of producing the keyboard click and buzzer sound.

Yes, I was amazed at just what complexity in engineering there was under the hood. You know, I never thought about it before but you are right. The sound from software comes through the RF signal hence comes out of the TV. That speaker IS just for the keyboard clicks etc.!

Tez