PDA

View Full Version : HardCard II 80



k3wals
June 28th, 2006, 06:09 PM
Hi, I'm new to this place, and it seems pretty nice so I though I would ask a question or two. :)

I'm working on a laser engraving machine and it has a IBM Model (from back) 1GH0206EA. It has the HardCard II 80 in it and its not very functional. When I first booted up the machine it showed the memory test a

161

1703(K) HardCard II Error at Bios address c8000h
1703(C) HardCard II Error at Bios address c8000h

162
163

I tried it a few times. I took out the hardcard and cleaned it out a bit using compressed air, I put it back in and after a few times again, it booted up into IBM BASIC. My main goal is to backup the files on this harddrive to transfer the software for the laser engraving to a more functional HD. BASIC only loaded up once.

I tried setting different channels on the switches on the card, and the error always shows the channel selected.

I tried the hardcard in another old computer of mine, I think its an XT, (DX CPU) and it showed the same error.

The 616 error I found to be something with setting not being set, so I though bad battery, and I couldn't find one at all on the motherboard. Is there one, and how do I acces the settings?

So does anyone have any suggestions, tips that I can try to possibly make it live one more time. :D Thanks.

Terry Yager
June 28th, 2006, 07:00 PM
Your CMOS battery has gone dead, and you're time & date settings are incorrect. Replace the battery, run the Setup disk, and try again.

--T

Luke
June 29th, 2006, 12:33 AM
If you have hard drive and your IBM machine boot up to BASIC it's not good.
Then it mean, that system don't see the hard drive.
It should boot to DOS from hard disk or display disk error.

modem7
June 29th, 2006, 01:25 AM
This is two problems.

161 is "CMOS configuration empty (dead battery)"
The other 16x codes are CMOS related and can be caused by a dead battery (i.e. no CMOS info)

As you've proven by moving the Hardcard to another machine, the 1703 errors are due to the Hardcard itself.

This machine sounds like it's been sitting in the corner for some years (resulting in a dead battery).

Either the Hardcard failed and that's why the machine was put aside, or the machine was put aside and the Hardcard has since deteriated.
If the latter, maybe stiction is the problem - do a Google search using 'hardcard stiction' to see what I mean.

modem7
June 29th, 2006, 03:23 PM
I should have added:
If the hare drive contains valuable data, inflicting physical shock to the drive (e.g. to remove stiction) is a last-resort measure, before perhaps looking at using a specialist data recovery service ($$$$$$$$$$$).

compu_85
June 29th, 2006, 04:27 PM
Hardcards sometimes need to be 'rebotted'... Take the drive out, tap it against your boot (or shoe :) ), then hold it firmly and spin it on the axis of the platters. like if you set it flat against the table and spun it, only it's in your hand. Shake it back and forth like this a bunch of times.

Tidbit: There is a driver that gets installed in config.sys for the hardcard. Without the driver, you can't write to the drive.

-Jason

k3wals
June 30th, 2006, 07:05 PM
Where is the battery located on the motherboard? I looked for it and I coudn't tell which one it was. IBM 1988 1gh0206ea
Thanks

modem7
July 1st, 2006, 05:40 PM
Unfortunately the "1gh0206ea" doesn't tell me much.

An IBM dated 1998 with a battery that is difficult to spot. Sounds like you have one of the PS/2 series that used a DS1287A module. Take a look at the bottom of http://www.tavi.co.uk/ps2pages/battery.html#72X8498

k3wals
July 3rd, 2006, 05:05 PM
Thanks, thats what was on there.

k3wals
July 12th, 2006, 01:26 PM
I should have added:
If the hare drive contains valuable data, inflicting physical shock to the drive (e.g. to remove stiction) is a last-resort measure, before perhaps looking at using a specialist data recovery service ($$$$$$$$$$$).

My boss bought a new battery(cmos) module, and the problem did not go away. So I said, ehh, what the heck I'll give it a try, took out the HardCard, hit it in my palm a few time, and wallla!!, I did not think that would fix it, THANK YOU!

Slawek

PS: So hitting something does fix it. :p

Erik
July 12th, 2006, 01:52 PM
PS: So hitting something does fix it. :p

Precussive maintenance works more than people think! Besides, it usually feels good to lay the smack-down on something that's pissing you off.

Terry Yager
July 12th, 2006, 03:41 PM
Don't forget to back-up tha data before it fails again.

--T

modem7
July 13th, 2006, 02:00 AM
Okay, at least your 1703(x) errors are gone.
If the 16x errors are still present, you may not have picked up from Terry's early comment that after replacing the battery, you need to run the setup disk (or however that's implemented on your PS/2).

compu_85
July 13th, 2006, 09:29 AM
The backhand repair technique strikes again! lol!

2x on that backup suggestion. But FWIW, since I 'unstuck' my hardcard it has been working properly. But it also doesn't have any sensitive data on it...

-Jason

k3wals
July 13th, 2006, 04:12 PM
Okay, at least your 1703(x) errors are gone.
If the 16x errors are still present, you may not have picked up from Terry's early comment that after replacing the battery, you need to run the setup disk (or however that's implemented on your PS/2).

I'm only 18 and I don't know the procedure's for these old computers. :(
I don't have the setup disk available. I searched on this site, and I found about the mcmafia. I just don't know what computer I have. Obvioulsy its a Ps/2, but which? On the Motherboard it say's (IBM Corp 1988 1GH0206EA). Where should I look to see what I got?


Don't forget to back-up tha data before it fails again.

--T

I am going to, but I don't know how to go about doing it. The computer has no molex or berg connectors. So is my only option saving parts at a time to floppies?

Thanks!

Slawek

Terry Yager
July 13th, 2006, 05:03 PM
I'm only 18 and I don't know the procedure's for these old computers. :(
I don't have the setup disk available. I searched on this site, and I found about the mcmafia. I just don't know what computer I have. Obvioulsy its a Ps/2, but which? On the Motherboard it say's (IBM Corp 1988 1GH0206EA). Where should I look to see what I got?



I am going to, but I don't know how to go about doing it. The computer has no molex or berg connectors. So is my only option saving parts at a time to floppies?

Thanks!

Slawek

If it's a PS/2, you'll need a 'Reference Disk' for that model. You should be able to look up the model number on IBM's website.

Unless you can get another hard drive installed, or move the hardcard to another machine with a drive, you're prob'ly stuck with a floppy disk backup. How to do it depends on which version of DOS it's running. (Type 'ver' and the version will be displayed).
If nothing else, at least backup the software for the engraving machine and any other data that may be irreplacable.

--T

modem7
July 14th, 2006, 05:48 PM
On the Motherboard it say's (IBM Corp 1988 1GH0206EA). Where should I look to see what I got?
Yes, identifying your PS/2 is the next step.
From my experience of PS/2s, a part number will be somewhere on the outside of the computer. Sometime it's well hidden, so look from all angles.
For example, a model 50 has a part number of 8550.

modem7
July 15th, 2006, 07:53 PM
That link to the battery site that I provided earlier indicates that your PS/2 can only be one of five possible models. Look for the 4 digit numbers shown below:

8550 = Model 50/50Z
8560 = Model 60
8570 = Model 70
8573 = Model P70 portable
8580 = Model 80

The number will normally be followed by a dash, then three alphanumeric characters, eg. 8550-A00, 8550-001

k3wals
July 15th, 2006, 07:56 PM
That link to the battery site that I provided earlier indicates that your PS/2 can only be one of five possible models. Look for the 4 digit numbers shown below:

8550 = Model 50/50Z
8560 = Model 60
8570 = Model 70
8573 = Model P70 portable
8580 = Model 80

The number will normally be followed by a dash, then three alphanumeric characters, eg. 8550-A00, 8550-001

I'll have a look at it tuesday. Thank you for being so helpful.

Slawek

modem7
July 15th, 2006, 09:20 PM
I am going to, but I don't know how to go about doing it. The computer has no molex or berg connectors. So is my only option saving parts at a time to floppies?
A backup right now should be your priority. A quick way is to use the 'backup' command in DOS to backup your C: drive to many diskettes.
See http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia_term/0,2542,t=DOS+BackupRestore&i=41733,00.asp

modem7
July 15th, 2006, 10:05 PM
And if the data is that important, do the backup twice, in case something went wrong with the first.
Also, create a DOS boot diskette, and copy the RESTORE.EXE file to it. That will speed up the recovery time (i.e. no need to go out and find a copy of the DOS you are using).
And again, depending on the importance, create images of the diskettes then copy the images to a more stable media (such as CD-ROM).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If the computer is important, plan for failure. The components most likely to fail are the power supply and the HardCard, but even a motherboard failure is going to put you off-air for a while.

If the laser is being controlled by a specialist Microchannel adaptor in the PS/2 (with corresponding specialist software on the hard drive), buying another PS/2 from eBay is a good option. It shouldn't need to be the same model PS/2 (as long as it uses a Microchannel bus), however because of possible timing issues with the software, you would aim for the same model.
A second PS/2 won't have a HardCard but you simply use the supplied hard drive instead.
And if you are using a specialist Microchannel adaptor, that then becomes the only single-point-of-failure (in the computer component of the overall laser system).

Terry Yager
July 16th, 2006, 09:32 AM
Early versions of DOS don't include the backup program. You may need an external backup program for those versions.

--T

atari2600a
July 16th, 2006, 09:42 AM
Alot of mobos today can handle OS/2, wouldn't just building a new computer & putting the software on it be an option maybe? Just curious...

Plus, Virtual PC could probobly be an option too...

modem7
July 17th, 2006, 01:05 AM
There are many possible solutions, but the viability of each solution is dependent on the peculiarity of the hardware/software required to drive the laser. For example, there may have been some custom software written that is hard coded to use a particular MCA based GPIB adaptor of the time.

Anyhow, it all could be academic. Let's see what other requests k3wals posts.

k3wals
July 25th, 2006, 03:11 PM
That link to the battery site that I provided earlier indicates that your PS/2 can only be one of five possible models. Look for the 4 digit numbers shown below:

8550 = Model 50/50Z
8560 = Model 60
8570 = Model 70
8573 = Model P70 portable
8580 = Model 80

The number will normally be followed by a dash, then three alphanumeric characters, eg. 8550-A00, 8550-001

I took a look at it today and it is a PS/2 Type 8530. Its not on your list so is it some "rare" computer? :rolleyes:

I'm going to connect the HardCard to my XT machine today, and I'm going to back up the data.

BTW. The laser engraving machine is working. :D

k3wals
July 25th, 2006, 05:34 PM
Still got some backup issues.

I booted up an old XT (intel dx2) with windows 95. In windows I used the "add new hardware" tool. About 8 minutes later, to my amazement it recognized the HardCard by labeling it "Plus HardCard II". It did its thing and shows up under IDE controllers but not under disk drives. Does anyone know how I can access the HardCard now? Thanks

Slawek

k3wals
July 25th, 2006, 05:52 PM
I found a link where I can get the reference disk http://ohlandl.ipv7.net/8530/8530-286_Planar.html, but the D/L link to IBM's website doesn't work. I though I remembered it working before. Any idea's? Thanks again!

modem7
July 25th, 2006, 11:59 PM
I took a look at it today and it is a PS/2 Type 8530. Its not on your list so is it some "rare" computer? :rolleyes:
Sorry for getting your hopes up. No it's not rare. You have a model 30.
I stuffed up when looking up the data on that web site.

modem7
July 26th, 2006, 12:33 AM
I found a link where I can get the reference disk http://ohlandl.ipv7.net/8530/8530-286_Planar.html, but the D/L link to IBM's website doesn't work. I though I remembered it working before. Any idea's? Thanks again!
Being a model 30 (effectively an AT clone), your machine doesn't use a reference disk. It uses a 'Starter disk'.
There's an image of the diskette at http://www.walshcomptech.com/selectpccbbs/

You'll need WinImage to create a diskette from the image.
In case you don't know:

1. Use a modern PC

2. Unzip the image file you downloaded to create the file 30START.IMG

3. Download and install WinImage 8 (free for evaluation from http://www.winimage.com/winimage.htm )

4. Using Windows Explorer, double-click on file 30START.IMG
WinImage will open showing numerous files.

5. Insert a 720K diskette into drive A:

6. On the WinImage menu bar, choose 'Disk' then 'Write disk'