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View Full Version : rs-232 <--> token ring??



NathanAllan
July 9th, 2006, 03:21 AM
Has there ever been a token ring adapter made for an rs-232 port? I've been looking for ways to make the atari ST I have get on a network, and ethernet is not practical for a 520ST or STFM, and that's what I've got. Too little ram and gem doesn't support it without lots of modification. Xircom has one (or had, since they stopped making them) for the parallel port but the st's ppt is wired differently and not all pins are connected.

Has there ever been a beast like that? rs-232 to token ring?

I got to thinking about this in the "Joys of filesharing" thread.

Nathan

mbbrutman
July 9th, 2006, 06:17 AM
I've a bit of Token Ring experience. Don't even think about it. It was technically superior in the day, but it's a dead technology now. Even IBM (the inventor) doesn't use it internally for networks anymore.

If you can get TCP/IP on a C64 running Contiki, you can certainly get it on a 520ST.

Take a look at http://www.dunkels.com/adam/tfe/hardware.html . You can get simple Ethernet chipsets that require only two 8 bit I/O ports for interfacing, which is very easy to do. Also take a look at 'Ethernut' ( http://www.ethernut.de/ ).

DimensionDude
July 9th, 2006, 04:49 PM
This may or may not do what you want, but check out
http://www.lantronix.com/device-networking/external-device-servers/uds-10.html

It can emulate a modem, so you can connect to your network using standard terminal software. You may be able to find a used one, cheap, I have one that was salvaged from a piece of equipment at the plant where I work. Haven't messed with it much except for connecting it to my LAN to find out if it actually worked.

Kent

BradN
September 1st, 2010, 11:39 AM
Sorry for gravedigging such an old thread, but is there any more info on a 2x8 bit register ethernet interface? This would connect directly to the serial header on Sanyo MBC-55x, and even +/-12V are available. Even 4x8 bit would be do-able but not as efficiently (timer chip must be programmed to set one of the address lines). The most suitable chip I was able to find used 4 address lines, and this would need extra addressing logic.