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alexkerhead
July 11th, 2006, 01:32 PM
Please choose one option, if your favorite is not in here, please choose the best in your opinion from the list.

Erik
July 11th, 2006, 02:31 PM
An interesting question, but since you said "of all time" I have to vote IBM. From the 1880 census on forward they have been a dominant player often setting the pace in information technology. Nobody else can lay that claim.

tgunner
July 11th, 2006, 02:41 PM
I voted IBM, the world would not be as it is now if it hadn't been for their early main-frames, and later PC's, which also sparked a generation of IBM-clones, bringing us to where we are now.

alexkerhead
July 11th, 2006, 02:52 PM
Interesting outcome so far, keep voting folks. ^_^

CP/M User
July 11th, 2006, 03:50 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Please choose one option, if your favorite is not in
> here, please choose the best in your opinion from the
> list.

I'd have to say my ol' faitful Amstrad - though I'm appauled
you've got IBM, Atari/Inforgrammes & Commodore in your list &
left Amstrad off - the only thing I could list there is an
Texas Instruments (I like their 99/4a machine).

CP/M User.

NathanAllan
July 11th, 2006, 03:59 PM
An interesting question, but since you said "of all time" I have to vote IBM. From the 1880 census on forward they have been a dominant player often setting the pace in information technology. Nobody else can lay that claim.
For me it was a toss up with apple, commodore and atari, and atari won cause of the Falcon and the ST's. I'll give IBM plenty of points, but if it weren't for the competetion that my Big Three gave them they may have done things differently.

Mad-Mike
July 11th, 2006, 04:18 PM
IBM definatley, they changed the industry to what it is now, and their computers have alwasy been rather well made and very reliable.

atari2600a
July 11th, 2006, 05:57 PM
An interesting question, but since you said "of all time" I have to vote IBM. From the 1880 census on forward they have been a dominant player often setting the pace in information technology. Nobody else can lay that claim.

Sure it's not because your father worked there? :p

I voted for Atari. Hooray Atari 800!

alexkerhead
July 11th, 2006, 06:12 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Please choose one option, if your favorite is not in
> here, please choose the best in your opinion from the
> list.

I'd have to say my ol' faitful Amstrad - though I'm appauled
you've got IBM, Atari/Inforgrammes & Commodore in your list &
left Amstrad off - the only thing I could list there is an
Texas Instruments (I like their 99/4a machine).

CP/M User.
I could only choose 10 brands(10 poll options), and Amstrad was not popular enough to be in the list.

spencersamueldodson
July 11th, 2006, 08:18 PM
I say Apple, but with Silicon Graphics, Inc. coming in 2nd.

CP/M User
July 11th, 2006, 11:00 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> I could only choose 10 brands(10 poll options), and
> Amstrad was not popular enough to be in the list.

Perhaps the results are somewhat bias - well it's guess it's
not as bad as running your favourite machine studies on a site
which is purely based around a particular.

Amstrad were perhaps better known for their PCW based machines
in the US, CPCs were produced there - which is where the
problem is. I mean to run a survey about any machine could be
a big problem because in different parts of the world -
slightly different machines are found.

I don't see Atari as popular -anymore-. I'm heading this
boycott due to their treatment towards myself & their machines
as well as their honesty to do business.

CP/M User.

alexkerhead
July 11th, 2006, 11:49 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> I could only choose 10 brands(10 poll options), and
> Amstrad was not popular enough to be in the list.

Perhaps the results are somewhat bias - well it's guess it's
not as bad as running your favourite machine studies on a site
which is purely based around a particular.

Amstrad were perhaps better known for their PCW based machines
in the US, CPCs were produced there - which is where the
problem is. I mean to run a survey about any machine could be
a big problem because in different parts of the world -
slightly different machines are found.

I don't see Atari as popular -anymore-. I'm heading this
boycott due to their treatment towards myself & their machines
as well as their honesty to do business.

CP/M User.
Do you argue about everything?
Point: Amstrad isn't popular enough WORLDWIDE to add to a poll like this, they didn't leave any legacy or have any large fan following. The brands I chose DO HAVE LARGE FAN FOLLOWINGS.
I am not being biased, I don't have a MITS, IMSAI, or atari, but they are still in the list because of their huge fan following.
Amstrad lacks worldwide praise and legacy. Just like Acorn Computers, they made tons of units, but they left no legacy and have little fan following.

dongfeng
July 12th, 2006, 12:31 AM
I voted IBM, their influence in the 1980's took the world where it is now in regard to IT. If there was a second vote allowed on the poll I'd put Apple.

Regarding Amstrad, I love my CPC6128, but I don't think Amstrad where influencial or innovative enough to take my vote from any of the others.

CP/M User
July 12th, 2006, 01:55 AM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Do you argue about everything?

Yeah unfortunately since I've been learning about "being fair"
over the last couple of years this topic seems to stand out.

> Point: Amstrad isn't popular enough WORLDWIDE to add
> to a poll like this, they didn't leave any legacy or
> have any large fan following. The brands I chose DO
> HAVE LARGE FAN FOLLOWINGS.

True, however this topic has been called "Best computer brand
of all time!"

> I am not being biased, I don't have a MITS, IMSAI, or
> atari, but they are still in the list because of
> their huge fan following.

Fraid so - I refer you to the name of the topic. Plus to the
limited selection.

> Amstrad lacks worldwide praise and legacy. Just like
> Acorn Computers, they made tons of units, but they
> left no legacy and have little fan following.

I disagree strongly on the point that Amstrad had little fan
following, upto this day those CPC based machines have had a
following - just like your Commodores - sure Commodore might
of sold more on the world market, though while lots of people
have moved on - people do that as well.

My dispute with this topic is the name of the topic - I mean
it could be renamed to "Best Computer Brand in the US" - that
way at least you exclude the machines from other regions -
still maybe bias - but at least it's reduced. The other way -
which would involve some dramatic changes to the Forum (lots
of work otherwise) is having it under Regional Discussions (I
mean that's what your emphasising) - but to change it you'd
have to post it in the 5 US regions that are currently there -
no you'd have to setup a new area which would cover the entire
US & have the regions put into that like this:-

Regional Discussions
|
|-> US
|---|
|---|->North
|---|->South
|---|->East
|---|->West

Or whatever their called!

The other fair way concerns the Poll - it's limited like you
said - to 10 Computer Manufacturers - not exactly fair. The
best way - if you really wanted the World to have it's say on
it, is to create a tally system & have people saying what
their favourite system of all time. After a certain period you
close your poll & tally up the votes. Anyone could say
anything they want that way - seems fair! :-D

Also I'd hate to say this to you, but consider the fact that
one of those other systems wasn't released anywhere but the US
- well maybe not in this case - though I wouldn't want to say
that all those machines were sold here in Oz. or the mother
country - UK.

I'm not trying to make you look silly - or pick on your
country, I just feel with a little bit more planning it could
be fair.

CP/M User.

Mad-Mike
July 12th, 2006, 02:23 AM
I said IBM for the following reasons (did not have time to post, just upgraded Windows today).

- Started making office tools in teh 1880's, so they'd been in the industry awhile, making other now collectable items for IBM officianados even back then.

- Created the UNIVAC or something like it if I recall, one of those huge analog vaccum tube powered computers that took up a whole room and made that room hot as the tropics

- Made their biggest and still undenyable impact with the IBM PC 5150 in 1981, which everybody started to clone and copy to some extent in the 80's, it lead to what the computers are now....

- Because of said PC, Microsoft became the great monopoly it is today, with the most popular operating system, Microsoft Windows XP, which was based off NT, which used bits of a joint project with IBM called OS/2

- Even now still continue to be a popular choice for Servers, I've seen plenty of them in use in passing, the IBM RS/6000 is still very popular in some places, as was the IBM 370 mainframe.

Just that much alone is enough for consideration to me.

mbbrutman
July 12th, 2006, 05:33 AM
The IBM employee votes for IBM. The list of contributions to computing for over a 100 years is impossible by anybody to match, except probably for the people who invented numbers and index cards.

That being said, the poll might be more interesting if it were worded differently. There are popular computer brands, innovative computer brands, etc. If you just say 'the best of all time' then IBM has to win .. it's not much of a poll.

If the arena is personal computers, perhaps the poll options would be:

- Best overall personal computer.
- Most innovative personal computer.
- Most market impact.
- The 'ahead of it's time' award. (Which is not a good thing.)
- etc.

A poll like that leaves room for discussion ..

carlsson
July 12th, 2006, 06:40 AM
But can you say that IBM all since 1880 has worked with (forerunners) to computer technology, or did they enter this new field of technology somewhere in the 1950's or so? For being so leading in the field of computing, it took them a surprisingly long time to enter the personal computer segment. Smaller, younger companies as Altair, Apple, Atari, Commodore, Texas Instruments etc were more brave in that respect. Perhaps they didn't have as much to lose if personal/home computing would become a flop as a big, well-reputated company as IBM.

bbcmicro
July 12th, 2006, 07:13 AM
just like Acorn Computers, they made tons of units, but they left no legacy and have little fan following.
Being honestly unbaised, that applies worldwide, but BBCs, RISC-PCs, Archimedes and Electrons have a huge following in the UK.

If this thread was entitled "Which computer brand was the most revolutionary", or "Had the biggest impact" I would have voted IBM, or maybe Altair if the choice was given, or IMSAI. As this is for the best computer brand, and I assume that is meant to mean the quality of their machines, I voted Apple.

mbbrutman
July 12th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Smaller, younger companies as Altair, Apple, Atari, Commodore, Texas Instruments etc were more brave in that respect. Perhaps they didn't have as much to lose if personal/home computing would become a flop as a big, well-reputated company as IBM.

More brave? No. The 'B' in IBM stands for 'business', and most of those early personal computers were not suitable for business use. IBM wasn't in the market because it was a hobbyist market, not a business market. The Apple ][ came to closest to being usable for business with an 80 column card and Visicalc. Word processing was nearly non-existant back then because of the limited memory sizes, but spreadsheets were a very good use of the available hardware.

IBM entered the market after Apple showed the potential for a personal computer to be used in a business environment. The design of the PC reflects that; it was physically larger, better constructed, and the hardware/software architecture was better thought out, reflecting IBM's design expertise on other larger systems. The PC wasn't introduced as a home hobbyist machine - it was introduced as a business tool. Home adoption came later.

Here is yet another innovation from IBM that affected personal computers greatly .. the floppy disk.

Erik
July 12th, 2006, 08:13 AM
Additional IBM introduced their first PC in 1975, about the same time MITS was rolling out ads for the Altair.

Sure, the IBM unit cost a lot more, but it was also far more capable than anything released by anyone else for several more years.

Look up the IBM 5100 when you've got a chance. . . ;)

mbbrutman
July 12th, 2006, 08:24 AM
I wasn't going to brag, but the 5100 was developed at IBM Rochester, where I work today.

No, we don't have any spares around. :-)

Erik
July 12th, 2006, 09:36 AM
Not even a spare power supply? I kinda need one. . . ;)

NathanAllan
July 12th, 2006, 10:53 AM
Additional IBM introduced their first PC in 1975, about the same time MITS was rolling out ads for the Altair.

Sure, the IBM unit cost a lot more, but it was also far more capable than anything released by anyone else for several more years.

Look up the IBM 5100 when you've got a chance. . . ;)
DOH! I forgot about the 5100. Almost a strong enough argument to make me change my vote... almost. Now we just need a time traveler to come back looking to save the world with an 800XL.

www.johntitor.com

CP/M User
July 12th, 2006, 04:46 PM
carlsson wrote:

> But can you say that IBM all since 1880 has worked
> with (forerunners) to computer technology, or did
> they enter this new field of technology somewhere in
> the 1950's or so?

Actually it was in 1939 under the guidance from Howard Aiken
that IBM became involved in creating the Harvard Mark I - this
of course was completed in 1944.
This machine was quite reliable - however results were slow as
this machine used relays instead of Electronic tubes (Valves).
Unfortunately this machine was the first to have a bad case of
the bug. Relay number 70 Panel F - a Moth was within the
relay. Grace Hopper didn't look impressed.

CP/M User.

Micom 2000
July 12th, 2006, 08:26 PM
I of course vote for Big Blue. They were bastards much like Microsoft now. When they saw the potential of personal computers for small business as displayed by Apple withVisicalc, they entered the market. DEC also entered but they were too late with the Rainbow. Radio-Shacks Model 2 also approached this market, but the business-clout respectability of IBM won the day.

"Word processing was nearly non-existant back then because of the limited memory sizes, but spreadsheets were a very good use of the available hardware."

Now here I must disagree with you, Mike. The first programmable word processor was produced by AES a Montreal company around the early 70's. One of the founders of that was Stephan Dorsey who when he sold his share, along with another AES guy founded Micom.
There were many dedicated word processing machines.

I can remember seeing a girlfriends sister's quite expensive machine in the early 70's which she freelanced on for various companies including publishers for printing.
It was a home/small business operation.

When the Micom came out, altho it was a true computer,
with an 8080 CPU, they marketed it as a word processor.
Before the Apple was even out of Woz's garage.

What coaxed Big Blue into entering the small business market was also the inroads the Hyperion was making into the Insurance market. Visicalc on the Apple was also a wakeup call. Their dominance was threatened, CPM spurned them and voila! there was Bill Gates.

IBM has screwed up time and time again. Their response to the open sytem 5150 clones would eventually lead them
to charge rediculously expensive costs to use PS/2 which the consortium of manufacturers blew away with LEM.

There is a reason IBM sold off it's personal computer division. Total incompetancy which could at one time get past the bean-counters overwhelmed by BIG BLUE.

Don't take me wrong, I'm not an IBM-beater, their quality in general is the best.
As for word processing. IBM was pitiful. Not only was Micom and TRS-80 m2 Scriptsit obviously better than anything IBM put out, it is evident in the success of Wordstar andWordperfect.

Laying that to rest, the reason IBM succeeded with the 5150, was bercause of their clout with the bean-counters.
-------------------------------------------------------------

IBM entered the market after Apple showed the potential for a personal computer to be used in a business environment. The design of the PC reflects that; it was physically larger, better constructed, and the hardware/software architecture was better thought out, reflecting IBM's design expertise on other larger systems. The PC wasn't introduced as a home hobbyist machine - it was introduced as a business tool. Home adoption came later.

Here is yet another innovation from IBM that affected personal computers greatly .. the floppy disk.[/QUOTE]

IBM pioneered that ? I thought it was Shugart. I know Micom's Shugart was doing it in 77.

Lawrence

mbbrutman
July 13th, 2006, 05:20 AM
Every try word processing on a Pet, C64, or Apple ][? The Apple didn't even have lower case standard ! Perhaps some of the other machines were better ...

Shugart developed the 8" floppy while working for IBM. Shugart later went on to do many things, but it started at IBM and I'm sure IBM held the patents.

carlsson
July 13th, 2006, 06:53 AM
The C64 was released after the IBM PC 5150, and despite what Commodore tried to say, it never was a business machine like the PET had been.

I have also read that many businesses were hesistant to invest in computers until IBM entered the market, giving the "clear" signal. But if it hadn't been for the other brands and in particular Apple who reached modest success, maybe IBM had remained with their mainframes and items they knew best and already made profit from. The 5100 was news to me, but if it took six years until the next investment into micro computers, the early IBM must've been more like an experiment than a determined business decision that micro computers would be possible to sell shortly.

Sure, a company is all about making business and they had enough R&D to not spend money on marketing a product they were not sure if anyone wanted, but if they had been leading and dominating the industry since the 40'ties, it was a bit holding back once the new technology had arrived.

Vlad
July 13th, 2006, 07:06 AM
I voted IBM, but not for all those reasons. I just like IBM....

-VK

Terry Yager
July 13th, 2006, 08:37 AM
Since the question is essentially a religious one, I chose Kaypro, just because it's my favorite of the choices available.

--T

alexkerhead
July 13th, 2006, 09:12 AM
Since the question is essentially a religious one, I chose Kaypro, just because it's my favorite of the choices available.

--T
That would have definitely been my second choice. I love my Kaypro, metal case for the win. ^_^

Terry Yager
July 13th, 2006, 10:49 AM
Actually, my favorite computer is the Epson PX-8, but it isn't on the list. Also, notably absent is the TRS-80, which for a while, was the best-selling personal computer in the world.

--T

alexkerhead
July 13th, 2006, 11:36 AM
Radio Shack/Tandy computers didn't leave a lasting impression or legacy, just some of their stuff is really cool. ^_^
Remember, I listed brands, not particular computers.

kb2syd
July 14th, 2006, 06:28 AM
Radio Shack/Tandy computers didn't leave a lasting impression or legacy, just some of their stuff is really cool.
I love Tandy computers, and have quite an extensive collection of them, but I have to agree with alexkerhead on this.

The only lasting thing Radio Shack/Tandy did for the computer market was show everyone how to kill an innovative company. But we have plenty of other examples of that too (e.g. Jack Tramiel).

Microsoft's waffling and slight of hand had a bit to do with the demise too (such as their refusal to fix the bugs in 6000 Xenix, and their killing of Modular Windows).

80sFreak
July 14th, 2006, 08:14 AM
Every try word processing on a Pet, C64, or Apple ][? The Apple didn't even have lower case standard ! Perhaps some of the other machines were better ...


I did a little bit of word processing on the C64 for school projects but my dad did a *lot* of that on our 64. I am surprised the Return key lasted - he always used to hit it very hard! He also did a lot of spreadsheet work on it - even got a bonus from the company he worked at for something he automated with a spreadsheet.

Cheers,

80sFreak

Terry Yager
July 14th, 2006, 09:02 AM
Radio Shack/Tandy computers didn't leave a lasting impression or legacy, just some of their stuff is really cool. ^_^
Remember, I listed brands, not particular computers.

Excuse me? How about the legacy of affordable computers in the hands of nearly everyone who wanted one? (The Model I hit the shelves at $599.00). As for 'lasting impression', try google. There are at least 3,250,000 hits on computer users who might disagree with you. BTW, TRS-80 is/was a brand, embracing several models.

--T

Terry Yager
July 14th, 2006, 09:06 AM
The only lasting thing Radio Shack/Tandy did for the computer market was show everyone how to kill an innovative company. But we have plenty of other examples of that too (e.g. Jack Tramiel).

Well, if corporate suicide is a valid criteria, then Osborne doesn't belong on the list either.

--T

Terry Yager
July 14th, 2006, 09:17 AM
If we're talking about innovation, contributions, etc. then how come nobody mentioned XEROX? It's PARC project was among the greatest influences of all time.

--T

atari2600a
July 14th, 2006, 09:31 AM
Wouldn't TRS-80 be more of a series?

Terry Yager
July 14th, 2006, 09:32 AM
What about DEC, also not among the choices? The survey is flawed in that it doesn't allow for enough choices to cover all of the most major of players. (This is why I usually try to avoid 'religious issues' when speaking of computers).

--T

kb2syd
July 14th, 2006, 10:09 AM
How about the legacy of affordable computers in the hands of nearly everyone who wanted one?

But they weren't the only afforable computer, nor the first. They just had great a distribution network.



BTW, TRS-80 is/was a brand, embracing several models.

Several families of models.
You had the Model I family (I, III, IV, 4p),
the II family (II, 12, 16, 16b, 6000),
the 2000 family (of 1),
the 100 (100, 102, 200) family
the CoCos (1, 2, 3)
the pocket computers (PC-1 through PC-8).

I have at least one of each of the above except the pocket computers.

I think once they went to primarily PCs, they standardized on "Tandy" as the name. Some of the above models that continued across that boundry became "Tandy" also.

Don't get me wrong, I love em, but innovative is pushing it.

Terry Yager
July 14th, 2006, 10:20 AM
I've stripped my TRS-80 'collection' down to bare-bonez. I have the 4P, a Model III (for running tape-based software), and a Model 100. I do have a few Tandy-badged items too, as well as an LNW-80 (TRS-80 clone).

--T

CP/M User
July 14th, 2006, 04:27 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> I've stripped my TRS-80 'collection' down to bare-
> bonez.

Why didja go & do that for?

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
July 14th, 2006, 05:34 PM
Space, mainly.

--T

CP/M User
July 14th, 2006, 06:37 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Space, mainly.

Oh Okay! :-D

CP/M User.

alexkerhead
July 14th, 2006, 10:04 PM
I have a single 15x20 room and I have all my units in there..lol
I live in that room as well.

Terry Yager
July 15th, 2006, 02:27 AM
Remember the pix of Erik's garage? Multiply by about three... 2 bedrooms, 12' x 12' shed, 3 5' x 10' mini-storage units...you get the picture...

--T

atari2600a
July 15th, 2006, 02:42 AM
Sounds like heaven to me! I wonder how much it would cost to rent a small warehouse...

carlsson
July 15th, 2006, 05:25 AM
For me, I have no interest in owning/having access to more items than I can semi-regularly use or at least look at. Maybe I'm lacking the true Collector gene in my DNA. The only reason I could find for renting a storage room was if I got ahold of a large amount of stuff (e.g. the PET stuff), and knew that within reasonable time I could sell off everything I don't want to keep. But then again, I'm lacking the true Trader gene in my DNA as well... I have a small fragment of the Programmer gene, a bit of the User gene and occassionally a hint of the Gamer gene.

Do you think there are more distinct vintage computing/video gamer genes than those five? The Hardware or Repair gene, the Documenter gene .. maybe there even is a Social gene somewhere? That would make it eight.

atari2600a
July 15th, 2006, 05:29 AM
If there's distinct gamer genes, then I have the Point-&-Click Adventure gene & the Puzzle Gene. Of course the Sonic & Mario genes go w/o mention. (everyone has those)

bbcmicro
July 15th, 2006, 06:01 AM
lol, in general I have the platformer gene and the adventure gene. Some sub-categorised genes; I have the Oblivion gene and the MGS Gene, although I think my MGS2 gene is recessive...Man that game was crap (IMHO).

bbcmicro
July 15th, 2006, 07:52 AM
On topic, however, I agree with Carlsson. If I have so much stuff, I can't enjoy using it, why should I have it? although I can understand just wanting something to complete/futher your collection

Terry Yager
July 15th, 2006, 09:13 AM
I do enjoy playing with all my toyz, at least on an occaisional basis. I spend a lot of time rotating stuph around. My living room right now has about five vintage systems set up, and a handful of not-so-vintage items. My bedroom also has at least eight systems in running condition (all laptops). I currently have three systems in my truck which are 'in transit', waiting to go to storage to make room for other stuph I feel like playing with this week.

--T

Terry Yager
July 15th, 2006, 09:17 AM
I think one of the most important genes is the 'PackRat' gene, which prevents one from ever throwing anything away (just in case ya might need it...someday).

--T

atari2600a
July 15th, 2006, 09:39 AM
I think one of the most important genes is the 'PackRat' gene, which prevents one from ever throwing anything away (just in case ya might need it...someday).

--T

I have that gene, & the worst part about it is when someone else throws something away!

Terry Yager
July 15th, 2006, 09:42 AM
I know the feeling. One man's trash becomes another man's trash...it ain't always treasure.

--T

carlsson
July 15th, 2006, 10:10 AM
But is PackRat a distinct gene, or a variation of the Collector gene? I figure today a lot of people have a combination of the Collector and Trader genes, with a bit of PackRat behavior shoed in.

Often it is brand specific too; one can be a collector of the system you like best, but can packrat other stuff (e.g. IBM) only for trading with. In particular if other people tend to have the items you want, but themselves are collecting something else. It becomes old-fashioned exchange trade, pretty much like how the trading phase in the board game Civilization (gosh, that was many years ago I played) works. One bronze, one fur and one hidden for two grain and that stupid calamity you probably have on your hand?

Terry Yager
July 15th, 2006, 11:21 AM
No, I think packrat is a seperate gene, although it can co-exist with the collector & trader genes. Packrats save everything, whether it's of any value or not, like the guy I know who has about 20 years of unread newspapers stacked up all over his place. This same guy has a fetish for women's shoes, and has hundreds of them around too. He's constantly prowling around thrift stores, looking for stuff. He bought a new Ford Fiesta a few years ago, and immediately removed all but the driver's seats, so he could haul more stuff home in it.

--T

Jorg
July 15th, 2006, 11:33 AM
I have that gene, & the worst part about it is when someone else throws something away!

Oh, yes, thats the worst! Because I never can get to throw away their dead body afterwards, and that is a nuisance :D

carlsson
July 15th, 2006, 01:34 PM
If all the shoes are of the same size, he only needs to find a woman of the right size who also is a shoe fetishist. Then he can give her a present every week, or let her move in and wear the shoes under the condition they still belong to him.

From time to time, I read about couples where both share an interest in vintage computing or video games, and that each collect different systems. Sometimes maybe one half gets the interest from the other, but sometimes it is the reason they met. I'm not entirely sure heterogenous collecting is good, as in the worst case it will require twice the space as if they had working on a collection together. On the other hand, if a couple splits up, it is much easier to know what is mine and what is yours.

One of the guys who arranged the retro gaming/swap meet recently is a collector of medium size, and his woman had been heard on radio (!) that they didn't even have closet space for clothes due to his computer stuff took up so much space. Then during the meet, there was too much vintage goodies for her to resist the temptation, so within a week she had bought a small horseload of items on her own. I suppose they have even less space for clothes now.. I told her she can't complain on radio anymore.

80sFreak
July 15th, 2006, 03:49 PM
It becomes old-fashioned exchange trade, pretty much like how the trading phase in the board game Civilization (gosh, that was many years ago I played) works. One bronze, one fur and one hidden for two grain and that stupid calamity you probably have on your hand?

I never had the chance to play the board game Civilization, but I did play the computer version of that game "Advanced Civilization" many many moons ago... (And I *don't* mean the Sid Meier game of the same name!) :) This one was by Avalon Hill.

Cheers,

80sFreak

carlsson
July 16th, 2006, 07:31 AM
Yep, there is a computer version of the board game. I tried it a bit, but it is not as fun as playing vs humans (maybe in a networked game, but I'm not so much for playing over a network). Advanced Civilization is an expansion to the original game, by the way. Bigger map, more commodities, slight rule changes. There are a few unofficial further expansions too. Avalon Hill made somewhat of a follow-up in the board game Age of Renaissance. It is more complex to play and not half as fun, in my point of view.

alexkerhead
July 16th, 2006, 12:10 PM
How did this get moved to off topic? 0_o

Terry Yager
July 16th, 2006, 12:25 PM
How did this get moved to off topic? 0_o

Seems appropriate, to keep down the clutter in the 'General' area, and given that the discussion has strayed far beyond the scope of the original topic. In fact, I'm locking the whole thread. (We've had our fun with it). Protests > dev/null else > Erik.

--T