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View Full Version : What is fastest intel socket 7 made?



ASSEMblergames
May 21st, 2013, 09:23 AM
I'm thinking pentium first generation.

Wasn't there an overdrive?

arrow_runner
May 21st, 2013, 09:55 AM
Probably 233MMX but I'm thinking there's a 266MHz MMX mobile CPU. Don't know if it will fit though.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_OverDrive#Pentium_sockets

krebizfan
May 21st, 2013, 11:17 AM
The mobile chips used a different socket so the low power Pentium MMX at 266 MHz and 300 MHz won't run in Socket 7. 233 MHz was best Intel offered. OverDrive for Socket 7 was capped at 200 MHz; see http://www.intel.com/support/processors/overdrive/sb/CS-023620.htm

Non-MMX Pentium peaked at 200 MHz with the OverDrive variants capped at 166 MHz (for P5C) and 133 MHz (for the initial P5 systems).

Old Thrashbarg
May 21st, 2013, 12:27 PM
Actually there were versions of the Tillamook chips (at least up to 266mhz, possibly 300 as well) in a Socket 7 PPGA package ... sort of. There are some little, but troublesome, differences from the desktop Socket 7 chips. Nevertheless, they can be made to work in some desktop boards with some modifications. It's been done, but it's not a "plug in and go" sort of thing, and it probably isn't worth the trouble.

Anonymous Coward
May 21st, 2013, 02:38 PM
I have a very general understanding of this, but it seems that the Tillamook chips use a caching scheme that is not compatible with the pipelined cache found on socket7 motherboards. The only way to have functional L2 cache (that I know of) is to use the old asynchronus stuff common on Socket5 motherboards. Getting the Tillamook going on a standard socket7 board isn't too difficult provided you can feed it the correct voltage....but generally L2 cache will be disabled.

Cager
May 22nd, 2013, 02:44 AM
I have a Pentium MMX 233MHz processor plugged into a QDI M/board, but I had to use jumper emulation mode in the BIOS to get the 233 MHz - the auto mode only went up to 200MHz.
This was the first Pentium PC I built, way back when, runs 98SE & is still operating - but not currently used for much!

Info' taken from Scott Mueller's "Upgrading & Repairing PC's" is that to run the MMX processors the Socket 7 M/boards has associated VRM modules to supply the lower (2.8v or less) voltages required by the MMX chips. As the VRM modules were socketed, the mobile 266MHz cpu (which requires 1.8v) could be used by utilising an appropriate VRM module.

Mau1wurf1977
May 25th, 2013, 03:22 PM
Yea the MMX 233 is the top Intel S7 CPU before they moved to Pentium II.

On S7 you should really check out AMD as they continued supporting this socket (Super Socket 7 with 100MHz FSB and multipliers up to 6x) to stay competitive against the PII. The K6-2, K6-2+ and K6-3+ come to mind and come with clock speeds of up to 550 MHz.

orion24
May 25th, 2013, 08:45 PM
I have a very general understanding of this, but it seems that the Tillamook chips use a caching scheme that is not compatible with the pipelined cache found on socket7 motherboards. The only way to have functional L2 cache (that I know of) is to use the old asynchronus stuff common on Socket5 motherboards. Getting the Tillamook going on a standard socket7 board isn't too difficult provided you can feed it the correct voltage....but generally L2 cache will be disabled.

Why will the L2 cache be disabled? It's not even inside the CPU; shouldn't this be beyond the control of the CPU?
BTW, I had no luck with a 266 MHz Tillamook and the ASUS P5A. It didn't post. I have an MVP3 board as well, but I didn't try it there.