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Chuck(G)
June 27th, 2013, 08:10 PM
TI's offering their Beaglebone mini-card with 1GHz Sidara ARM Cortex A-8 CPU preloaded with Angstrom Linux for $45.

Details here (http://www.ti.com/tool/beaglebk)

lotonah
June 27th, 2013, 10:59 PM
There are plenty of solutions out there that are either cheaper and/or better than the Raspberry Pi... but they won't win this round. It is all about buzz, the Pi has it and no other can match it.

So, the Pi is becoming well supported and documented, which makes it more enticing to beginners, which results in it being better supported, ad nauseam.

The downside to all of this is I think a follow up will be difficult for them... just soup it up (double the speed/RAM, etc), or come up with a new design altogether? Either way you alienate your fan base.

Chuck(G)
June 28th, 2013, 07:38 AM
I only mention the BBB because it might be more suitable for folks looking for a large number of GPIOs. There's a lot of detail on the circuitio.com website.

barythrin
June 28th, 2013, 08:44 AM
Hm. Cool, it's running Cloud9 hm no that's just dev.. it runs linux. I guess it natively doesn't have video output though? You buy an addon called a "cape"? Interesting though. The Raspberry is interesting but has so many addon costs it's sorta annoying. I've also looked at those crazy USB stick computers (even have dual core for under $70) although I see LOTS of reviews saying they overheat and break. Probably not complete or up to date but Wikipedia also offers a list of similar SBC devices (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_single-board_computers).



Board size 3.4" x 2.1"
DDR memory 512 MB
Development environment Cloud9 IDE on Node.JS with Bonescript library
Ethernet On-chip 10/100 Ethernet
JTAG Optional
Memory 2GB eMMC memory that’s pre-loaded with Angstrom distribution and that frees up your microSD card slot
More info Product Details
Power Options Via USB or 5V DC input
Price (USD) Per Unit $45.00
Processor 1GHz AM3359 Sitara ARM Cortex-A8
USB 1-port USB 2.0 Host
1-port USB 2.0 Client
Version Date 23 APR 2013



Target price:[7] US$ 25 US$ 35[73]
SoC:[7] Broadcom BCM2835 (CPU, GPU, DSP, SDRAM, and single USB port)[3]
CPU: 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S core (ARM11 family, ARMv6 instruction set)[3]
GPU: Broadcom VideoCore IV @ 250 MHz[74][75]
OpenGL ES 2.0 (24 GFLOPS)
MPEG-2 and VC-1 (with license[71]), 1080p30 h.264/MPEG-4 AVC high-profile decoder and encoder[3]
Memory (SDRAM): 256 MB (shared with GPU) 512 MB (shared with GPU) as of 15 October 2012
USB 2.0 ports:[14] 1 (direct from BCM2835 chip) 2 (via the built in integrated 3-port USB hub)[66]
Video input: A CSI input connector allows for the connection of a RPF designed camera module [76]
Video outputs:[7] Composite RCA (PAL and NTSC), HDMI (rev 1.3 & 1.4),[77] raw LCD Panels via DSI[78][79]

14 HDMI resolutions from 640350 to 19201200 plus various PAL and NTSC standards.[80]
Audio outputs:[7] 3.5 mm jack, HDMI, and, as of revision 2 boards, IS audio [81] (also potentially for audio input)
Onboard storage:[14] SD / MMC / SDIO card slot (3,3V card power support only)
Onboard network:[7][14] None 10/100 Ethernet (8P8C) USB adapter on the third port of the USB hub[66]
Low-level peripherals: 8 GPIO,[82] UART, IC bus, SPI bus with two chip selects, IS audio[83] +3.3 V, +5 V, ground[74][84]
Power ratings: 300 mA (1.5 W)[85] 700 mA (3.5 W)
Power source:[7] 5 volt via MicroUSB or GPIO header
Size: 85.60 mm 53.98 mm (3.370 in 2.125 in)[86]
Weight: 45 g (1.6 oz)[87]
Operating systems: Arch Linux ARM,[2] Debian Linux, Fedora, FreeBSD, NetBSD, Plan 9, Raspbian OS, RISC OS,[30]Slackware Linux[88]

cthulhu
June 28th, 2013, 09:28 AM
There are plenty of solutions out there that are either cheaper and/or better than the Raspberry Pi... but they won't win this round. It is all about buzz, the Pi has it and no other can match it.

So, the Pi is becoming well supported and documented, which makes it more enticing to beginners, which results in it being better supported, ad nauseam.

The downside to all of this is I think a follow up will be difficult for them... just soup it up (double the speed/RAM, etc), or come up with a new design altogether? Either way you alienate your fan base.

The main reason the Raspberry Pi costs as little as it does is that it appears Broadcom were stuck with a significant amount of the aging BCM2835 SoCs that they couldn't sell. The only devices I know of that used the BCM2835 prior to the Pi are a number of products made by Roku. Its been confirmed that Raspberry Pi Foundation founder and Broadcom employee Eben Upton got a special deal on the BCM2835, the exact details of which aren't publicly known. But since the Raspberry Pi Foundation are a charity it's likely that Broadcom donated the SoC to them. I'm sure there were tax incentives for doing this.