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View Full Version : August 12 2006 - 25th Anniversary



mbbrutman
July 24th, 2006, 05:13 PM
The IBM PC 5150 celebrates its 25th birthday soon!

http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/pc25/pc25_birth.html

Micom 2000
July 26th, 2006, 03:16 PM
That anniversity is not high on my IBM computer milestones list. Beside it spelling the end of the personal computer era of the small innovators and the beginning of the MS$ behemoth, it also was the beginning of the homogenation of computers. I think there would have been a standardization of peripherals and cross-portability even without it. The DEC Rainbow and other developments would have possibly succeeded and development would have proceeded even at a more break-neck pace.

Given that it did happen, to me the issue of the PS/2 8580 was a greater milestone and something I would celebrate. It put personal computers into a new era and forced many developments we're still benefitting from despite IBM's stupid licencing policies, or perhaps because of them. OS/2 was clearly superior to Win but like the victory of VHS over BETA, or the failure of Job's venture with the NEXT computer, the best unfortunately doesn't always win. All the could-have-beens.

Lawrence

carlsson
July 26th, 2006, 03:46 PM
Maybe it is because English is not my mother tongue, but I find the use of the word "justify" twice a little nonchalant: Prior to IBM's entry, the field of personal computing offered a few, useless applications that no company in their right minds could get away with buying, much less using. They were basically wasting money. All that changed in August 1981, when over night personal computers became "house-trained".

Terry Yager
July 26th, 2006, 06:11 PM
Maybe it is because English is not my mother tongue, but I find the use of the word "justify" twice a little nonchalant: Prior to IBM's entry, the field of personal computing offered a few, useless applications that no company in their right minds could get away with buying, much less using. They were basically wasting money. All that changed in August 1981, when over night personal computers became "house-trained".

Mebbe it's my less-than-perfect understanding of the Scandinavian mindset, but I find the use of the word 'nonchalant' a little hard to justify, when speaking of the computer industry in general, and especially IBM's decision to throw thier corporate hat into the ring. Most 'authorities' tend to criticize IBM for waiting so long to enter into the field of personal computers, a reluctance which can hardly be described as nonchalant. As for 'useless applications', Visi-Calc, widely considered to be the first 'Killer App', which single-handedly placed computers into the 'must-have' category of business machines, had already been around for several years before the advent of the IBM-PC. In fact, in the beginning, most of the apps available for the IBM were simply older programs which were ported over to the IBM platform.

(Don't mind me, carlsson...I was married to a Norwegian/American for 18 years, and I still don't understand Nordic thinking).

--T

carlsson
July 27th, 2006, 05:50 AM
I was not talking about IBM's decision to wait (they had made the 5100 already in 1975), but the web page linked to:


Non-IBM personal computers were available as early as the mid-1970s, first as do-it-yourself kits and then as off-the-shelf products. They offered a few applications but none that justified widespread use.


Early studies had concluded that there were not enough applications to justify acceptance on a broad basis [..]

In particular the first quote, that personal computers by other manufacturers had so few applications that they didn't justify widespread use, could probably be phrased in a better way, expressing that IBM didn't yet see any business potential in this segment, and thus waited until things had settled a bit.