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allienware
July 22nd, 2013, 04:46 AM
Hey hows everyone? i have smething to ask... A friend of my cousin will be having birthday and he wanna get him a new motherboard as he owes this guy big time. he plays ego shooters like crysis and if im not mistaken also Battlefield.he uses Philips for headphones for his games. Now my cousin is just looking for motherboard with good audio quality that will suits best from this headphones or whatever?

his budget is 250$ heres the spec. Intel Core i7 Processor 4765T AMD A10-6700. any recommendations?

Trixter
July 22nd, 2013, 08:53 AM
If you use the motherboard's digital out, it doesn't matter what the analog quality sounds like. Get whatever motherboard you like.

If he's shopping for a motherboard to work specifically with his analog headphones, you can get a slight quality increase with a slight CPU decrease in some games (support is not universal) by adding a cheap sound card: http://techreport.com/review/23358/asus-budget-xonar-dgx-and-dsx-sound-cards-reviewed

mbbrutman
July 22nd, 2013, 09:01 AM
Hey hows everyone? i have smething to ask... A friend of my cousin will be having birthday and he wanna get him a new motherboard as he owes this guy big time. he plays ego shooters like crysis and if im not mistaken also Battlefield.he uses Philips for headphones for his games. Now my cousin is just looking for motherboard with good audio quality that will suits best from this headphones or whatever?

his budget is 250$ heres the spec. Intel Core i7 Processor 4765T AMD A10-6700. any recommendations?

I presume that you did not mean to post this in "Vintage Computer Hardware" ?

Stone
July 22nd, 2013, 09:13 AM
I presume that you did not mean to post this in "Vintage Computer Hardware" ?Heheheh, you know that presumptions are a lot like assumptions... :-)

allienware
July 30th, 2013, 02:42 PM
If you use the motherboard's digital out, it doesn't matter what the analog quality sounds like. Get whatever motherboard you like.

If he's shopping for a motherboard to work specifically with his analog headphones, you can get a slight quality increase with a slight CPU decrease in some games (support is not universal) by adding a cheap sound card: http://techreport.com/review/23358/asus-budget-xonar-dgx-and-dsx-sound-cards-reviewed

Thank you for your help. The review is very interesting for me. Sadly it doesnt cover any comparisson of an exact motherboard, only a general audio chip. Anyway i found a board from biostar Hifi Series that sounds quite good. Its also running the realtek chipset, so it might be fine too?

@ mbbrutman: depends on how you define vintage? :P i didnt know the title of the forum means there is no discussion about anything else allowed.. :/

Trixter
July 30th, 2013, 03:10 PM
Realtek chipsets are the cheap, bottom-of-the-barrel embedded chipsets in almost every motherboard. You will not find a motherboard with decent onboard sound for analog output, so that's why I recommended $50 sound cards that will.

Unknown_K
July 30th, 2013, 03:29 PM
Some major manufacturer made a computer motherboard with an actual tube for the audio output.

http://images.techtree.com.s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/ttimages/story/AOpen-AX4PE-tube.jpg

Agent Orange
July 30th, 2013, 04:58 PM
Realtek chipsets are the cheap, bottom-of-the-barrel embedded chipsets in almost every motherboard. You will not find a motherboard with decent onboard sound for analog output, so that's why I recommended $50 sound cards that will.

Are you sure about that? My Asus with its 990 chipset gives me everything I need; CD's, radio, games, tv - the whole nine yards and sounds pretty darn good to me. However, my 73 year old ears may not be as sensitive as yours. I'd never throw 50 bucks on a sound card what with today's top flight motherboards.

Trixter
July 30th, 2013, 07:27 PM
Some major manufacturer made a computer motherboard with an actual tube for the audio output.

That was over a decade ago and was not duplicated.


Are you sure about that? My Asus with its 990 chipset gives me everything I need; CD's, radio, games, tv - the whole nine yards and sounds pretty darn good to me. However, my 73 year old ears may not be as sensitive as yours. I'd never throw 50 bucks on a sound card what with today's top flight motherboards.

With all due respect, your 73-yr-old ears are a sample size of one. I am in my 40's, and while I have lost almost 1KHz since my teens (I test myself every few years), I can hear hiss and computer processing EMI/RFI noise in my analog headphones connected to my Realtek-chipset-motherboard when the output is live but idle. So yes, an additional $50 soundcard is a worthwhile investment to anyone with my ears or better/younger.

The first 15 years I computed with music and sound, I had my outputs hooked up a cheap boombox. Games sounded amazing, 128kbps MP3s sounded amazing. I then got a pair of Klipsch THX-rated speakers and suddenly everything sounded horrible. Turned out that my boom box had a roughly 100-15000Hz range. My Klipsch's are rated 18-20000Hz. I am not an "audiophile" but even I could tell that my 128kbps MP3s had tons of artifacts, so I spent a year on and off re-encoding everything.

mbbrutman
July 31st, 2013, 05:05 AM
Thank you for your help. The review is very interesting for me. Sadly it doesnt cover any comparisson of an exact motherboard, only a general audio chip. Anyway i found a board from biostar Hifi Series that sounds quite good. Its also running the realtek chipset, so it might be fine too?

@ mbbrutman: depends on how you define vintage? :P i didnt know the title of the forum means there is no discussion about anything else allowed.. :/

How do we define vintage? Maybe when you have more than 5 posts you'll understand ...

And yes, other things can be discussed. Which is why we have "Off Topic" vs. on topic thread areas. You should do some more reading first before posting.

Agent Orange
July 31st, 2013, 08:57 AM
That was over a decade ago and was not duplicated.



With all due respect, your 73-yr-old ears are a sample size of one. I am in my 40's, and while I have lost almost 1KHz since my teens (I test myself every few years), I can hear hiss and computer processing EMI/RFI noise in my analog headphones connected to my Realtek-chipset-motherboard when the output is live but idle. So yes, an additional $50 soundcard is a worthwhile investment to anyone with my ears or better/younger.

The first 15 years I computed with music and sound, I had my outputs hooked up a cheap boombox. Games sounded amazing, 128kbps MP3s sounded amazing. I then got a pair of Klipsch THX-rated speakers and suddenly everything sounded horrible. Turned out that my boom box had a roughly 100-15000Hz range. My Klipsch's are rated 18-20000Hz. I am not an "audiophile" but even I could tell that my 128kbps MP3s had tons of artifacts, so I spent a year on and off re-encoding everything.

It appears that you are a true audiophile and really value the 'sonic' side of computing. I know of no one in my circle of enthusiasts (young or old) who sit around with headsets on while casually gaming or computing. A nice set of four-way or surround sound speakers seem to fill the bill. I have on occasion donned a headset but only so as not to intrude on others in the immediate area. It's just a matter of personal preferences, I suppose. I like shooter games, and as long as I can hear the crack of a rifle or the swoosh of a RPG, I'm happy. If high quality audio is of paramount importance, then maybe you should investigate some of the sound card options. However, on-board audio has come a long way these days. You can now compare the audio quality of Realtek's ACL892 chipset favorably with Audigy. So, IMO, I would rather take that 50-75 dollars and put it toward a nice SSD.

Unknown_K
July 31st, 2013, 10:37 AM
I think the sale of dedicated sound cards has dropped quite a bit in the last few years. Motherboard sound chips are better then they used to be, and manufacturers have figured out better ways of keeping motherboard induced distortion out. Even if you have a good soundcard you still need a good amplifier/speakers and good ears to tell the difference (as well as good source material). For gaming I was never too worried about noise, I still like the noise of the old SoundBlaster Pro cards in a 286. For music I just use computer optical out to a home stereo or those shiny things called CDs.