PDA

View Full Version : Good to bad weather in five minutes



alexkerhead
July 26th, 2006, 03:48 PM
Alabama summer weather, creeps up out of nowhere.
I got my camera out when it started forming.
http://img226.imageshack.us/img226/2443/10jv0.th.jpg (http://img226.imageshack.us/my.php?image=10jv0.jpg)
Then it started getting worse.
http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/2319/1fd1.th.jpg (http://img87.imageshack.us/my.php?image=1fd1.jpg)
Big dark clouds started rolling in.
http://img226.imageshack.us/img226/4868/12xd8.th.jpg (http://img226.imageshack.us/my.php?image=12xd8.jpg)
Minute later.
http://img226.imageshack.us/img226/8120/2jh6.th.jpg (http://img226.imageshack.us/my.php?image=2jh6.jpg)
Minute later.
http://img131.imageshack.us/img131/648/3lo7.th.jpg (http://img131.imageshack.us/my.php?image=3lo7.jpg)
Minute later.
http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/8015/4zj5.th.jpg (http://img87.imageshack.us/my.php?image=4zj5.jpg)
Minute later, I went in because the lightning got really bad, 4 strikes a minute. But I couldn't get any lightning images, really hard todo.
http://img131.imageshack.us/img131/7894/5pa8.th.jpg (http://img131.imageshack.us/my.php?image=5pa8.jpg)

80sFreak
July 26th, 2006, 03:59 PM
Minute later, I went in because the lightning got really bad, 4 strikes a minute. But I couldn't get any lightning images, really hard todo.


For lightning you have to leave the shutter open for awhile and hope one strikes soon before the picture gets too exposed. (Of course this would be easier to do at night...)

Cheers,

80sFreak

Terry Yager
July 26th, 2006, 06:20 PM
'Round here we say: 'If ya don't like the weather in Michigan, wait five minutes and it'll change.' We only have two seasons, Winter & (highway) Construction...

--T

CP/M User
July 26th, 2006, 08:23 PM
Sounds like a nice ordinary Melbourne day! :-D No well, it's not quite like that - however I remember one summers day when we came down to Melbourne (I grew up in Bendigo remember :-D 220k/m away or approx 135 miles north of Melb) we spent a few days down here - being Summer they were really hot - however on the last day down here they had this Cool change which blew me away. The temperature plumerated 15c in a matter of 20 minutes - it was quite suprising how temperature could change in so little time.

CP/M User.

alexkerhead
July 27th, 2006, 12:36 AM
At least we finally had some rain though, we had a long dry period.
Our grass is green again..lol

CP/M User
July 27th, 2006, 02:47 AM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Our grass is green again..lol

Sounds like you've got annual grass which can't handle the
extreme heat & needs rain to stay green.

I need to conduct more research to see if there's a connection
between annual grasses & the environments their supposed to be
in Vs. open Sunny ares which take a lot of heat.

CP/M User.

alexkerhead
July 27th, 2006, 08:39 AM
If we have regular rain, the grass is fine, but when we have dry spells, the grass browns up terribly.
All three kind we have.
We have Georgian, St. Augustine, and Centipede.
Georgian for the 1/2 sun areas, St. Augustine for the sunless areas, and Centipede for the sunny areas.
I planted the St. Augustine myself just recently, lol, it grows twice as fast as the other stuff, I am thinking about using it for the rest of the lawn.
If we get enough rain, we stay green everywhere almost all year, cept for winter, then most of the grass dies.

ribbets
July 27th, 2006, 11:16 AM
Not to change the original topic,but why would you want to plant more St. Augustine which needs more care(fertilizer and bug control)but does germinate quickly but is not as hardy and carefree as the centipede grass. The centipede originated in China and was brought to the US around 1916. It thrives in a sandy,acidic and low fertile soil. It is a short grass which requires less mowing
and makes excellent sod. Centipede is considered the lowest maintenance of all the warm season grasses.

alexkerhead
July 27th, 2006, 01:28 PM
Centipede hates the shade, we have a mess load of oak trees.

CP/M User
July 27th, 2006, 02:37 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> If we have regular rain, the grass is fine, but when
> we have dry spells, the grass browns up terribly.

Okay that's interesting.

> All three kind we have.
> We have Georgian, St. Augustine, and Centipede.
> Georgian for the 1/2 sun areas, St. Augustine for the
> sunless areas, and Centipede for the sunny areas.

Okay, it's a bit different than to what it is over here, most
of the "introduced" annuals die no matter how much rain/water
they get - they still die because that's the way they are here
- which suggests that their grasses which don't handle the
heat too well (they come from cooler areas). Your grasses
suggest to me, that these grasses come from Tropical areas
with higher rainfall - but it's interesting because you say
that 2 of those require either dabble (or 1/2) shade & full
shade - I suppose a tropical area could incorporate that.

> I planted the St. Augustine myself just recently,
> lol, it grows twice as fast as the other stuff, I am
> thinking about using it for the rest of the lawn.
> If we get enough rain, we stay green everywhere
> almost all year, cept for winter, then most of the
> grass dies.

Apart from that could you tell me how hot it gets there & what
sort of rainfall as well?

Thanks,
CP/M User.

alexkerhead
July 27th, 2006, 06:25 PM
Our average annual rainfall is 55 inches(140cm)
Summer it gets up to 110F(43.3C)
Winter it gets down to 10F(12.2C)

I am not worried about winter however, most grass will die in the winter.

Terry Yager
July 27th, 2006, 06:58 PM
I'm no lawn expert, but 'round here, most of the grass seems to be rye-based. It doesn't really die, just goes dormant in the Winter, so I consider it to be perennial, but I could be full of sh!t, too. (All I know iz that I mowed the lawn a week ago, and damned if it don't need it again! (behind two rainy dayz))...

--T

alexkerhead
July 27th, 2006, 07:08 PM
I love cutting grass.....We just got a 18hp troy built rider...bwuhahaha
It doesn't leave any blades of grass or leaves behind. Our yard looks a lot better since I started bagging it.

CP/M User
July 27th, 2006, 08:18 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Our average annual rainfall is 55 inches(140cm)

Crikey, that's 1400mm - that's a lot of rain. Our area & I'm
being highly localised here (cause other neigbourning regions
get a little bit more) is thought to have less than 70cm of
rain annually (27.5 inches) - though our country is considered
to be quite dry.

> Summer it gets up to 110F(43.3C)

Quite hot.

> Winter it gets down to 10F(12.2C)

Quite cold - sub-zero temperature, so I'm guessing snow &
little rain. 10F is -12.2c in fact! :-D

> I am not worried about winter however, most grass
> will die in the winter.

Okay, so I assuming you don't get snow - even though
temperatures seem to get down into that range for snow to
occur.

We've got all sorts of introduced grass like that - grass
which dies in Summer, dies in Winter & some of the same
varieties don't die at all & others will. There's also some
introduced perennials too which are quite problematic. The
local varaties seem to cope well without dying (some do though
after seeding) just depends on how established they are &
usually they are - the ones I use only die off a little bit
after the seed is produced (around Christmas & the new years)
in summer, though they come back well.

CP/M User.

alexkerhead
July 27th, 2006, 08:27 PM
I'll experiment with the St. Augustine for a while, becuase I like cutting grass.
Maybe I can hybrid them, we'll see.
I am going to stick a plot of ST. A in every dead spot in our centipede..lol...Anything is nicer than dead grass.
Thanks for the advice ya'll.
Indeed, we only get snow once every fours years, but it gets miserably cold and the ground freezes over with ice from the dew in the winter and miserably hot in the summer/spring.
We have one month of good temperatures, that is in october(Late fall).
Yeah, I know Australia must get way too dry.
What kind of grass do you have?

CP/M User
July 27th, 2006, 08:45 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> I'm no lawn expert, but 'round here, most of the
> grass seems to be rye-based. It doesn't really die,
> just goes dormant in the Winter, so I consider it to
> be perennial, but I could be full of sh!t, too.

Show me one person who isn't - besides someone who's just
deposited - the body is always producing the stuff!

Yes, Annuals sometimes only last the season, though I believe
they can return as well - dammed if I wrong though. I
generally considered a plant which went dormant to be a plant
which simply shuts off in growth (usually winter) however
remaining visible durning a season. Then there's other plants
which aren't visible durning a whole season (our orchids are a
classic example - though Lillies, Bulbaceous plants could well
be as well). They have another term for them, geo<something a
rather> geo meaning Earth and another term which explains how
they return to the earth. Not sure if it's Geophyte? or
something else, cause I've got a funny feeling a simular term
(if not that) is explained for Gems Crystals.

We've got some Rye based grasses here, Annual Rye Grass
(Lolium rigidum) is a classic example (all introduced pasutre
based grasses) - which typically die when the weather warms up
(just after seeding typically enough).

> (All I know iz that I mowed the lawn a week ago, and
> damned if it don't need it again! (behind two rainy
> dayz))...

Figuritively speaking though, it's great if your region
supports a grass which doesn't grow too high - you can mow it
& you don't have to mow it often. It's a painstaking process
of removing the introduced & replacing it. I've had little
luck germinating local grass by direct seeding the soil
(although occassionally takes a little while to pop up -
couple of weeks) - propagation via pots means removal from
that into where you want it - works though is slow work.

CP/M User.

CP/M User
July 27th, 2006, 09:22 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> What kind of grass do you have?

The stuff in my backyard or the stuff found all over
Australia? Okay, in my backyard (in the lawn) I have a
particular variety of Wallaby Grass (Austrodanthonia
geniculata) & Weeping Grass (Microlaena stipoides) -
everything else is foreign grass & some herby species to go
with it (and there's a lot of thatr still), most of them are
annual rye grasses which die in the summer and Kyuyu & Buffalo
Grass (which I think is refered to as Crab grass in the US).
While Kyuyu & Buffalo are both perennial grasses - I
personally dislike them cause their hard to mow when wet &
tend to grow in your garden - both are tricky to remove as
well. Also some Panic Veldt Grass (Ehrharta erecta) which is
quite nasty if it gets out of control - easy to remove though
(looks simular to Weeping grass - though a lot brighter
looking & the leaf is much wider).

Australia overall has many species of grasses - just in the
local area alone there's easily 25 different species, possibly
50, when I think about the core groups there's perhaps only 10
- some variety are quite diverse (e.g. Wallaby Grass) & travel
over a long distance. Not sure if anyone would be able to
insight every known species of native grass in Australia
through Visural identification - but geez, you'd have to
have something better than a computer connected to your brain
just to remember! :-D

CP/M User.