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Springbok
September 6th, 2013, 03:53 AM
Well,

I just finished restoring the IBM PS/2 8570 PC I bought. Very happy with it. Literally looks brand new inside and out.

However, through this process I realized how limiting the MCA-based architecture is, as well as the case.

So I think it is time to find the next project. I am looking for suggestions for a 386-based gaming machine and monitor. Something with 5 1/4" bays. Something that looks vintage, but cool. Not apposed to a non-tube monitor either.

Suggestions?

barney
September 6th, 2013, 07:00 AM
Any generic Tower or Desktop from the early to mid 90's. Just make sure it has a "turbo" button to allow throttleing the speed. In fact, if your interrested, I have a spare tower I'm selling. It's has a tubo button, reset button and an AT power supply installed. It's perfect for a 286, 386 or 486 system. Let me know, thanks.

Barney

Agent Orange
September 6th, 2013, 07:05 AM
Well,

I just finished restoring the IBM PS/2 8570 PC I bought. Very happy with it. Literally looks brand new inside and out.

However, through this process I realized how limiting the MCA-based architecture is, as well as the case.

So I think it is time to find the next project. I am looking for suggestions for a 386-based gaming machine and monitor. Something with 5 1/4" bays. Something that looks vintage, but cool. Not apposed to a non-tube monitor either.

Suggestions?

If you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a 486 as a gamer. A lot more exciting to build and way more hardware options, not to mention the performance gains for about the same amount of money. BTW, I use a 15" Dell LCD with absolutely no problems with DOS or early Windows (1024 x 760 max). You can make it look as 'vintage' as you wish. Good luck.

glitch
September 6th, 2013, 07:10 AM
BTW, I use a 15" Dell LCD with absolutely no problems with DOS or early Windows (1024 x 760 max). You can make it look as 'vintage' as you wish. Good luck.

If you go the LCD route, it's best to find one with a native resolution that matches what you plan to run at. Most of them look horrible at anything non-native. On the plus side, lower-resolution LCDs are usually very cheap.

Caluser2000
September 6th, 2013, 01:12 PM
If you want to go with a 386 system there are mobos with the ability to to take both 386DX and 486 processors so that'll get you more options. I'm with AO though. You can throttle back a 486 system easily enough and the last of the 486 boards had PCI slots and if you are lucky enough it may have a vlb slot or two.

I don't have a problem with dos using LCD screens i have. It's a 17" hp H723 monitor and sometimes use it in conjunction with my 386dx/25 system. Because of eye sight issues I prefer bigger the better. Would'nt mind a beige LCD screen though.

Hope you get what you're after.

oblivion
September 9th, 2013, 10:25 AM
If you want a a 386 based PC I'm going to suggest going with a AMD 386-40mhz. If you already have a 486 based system and want something on the slower side of the 386 spectrum go with a 25mhz 386. As for cards your probably (defiantly?) going to be limited to 16 bit ISA so for sound Id ideally go with a sound blast pro 2.0. a sb16 would be cheaper and easier but I don't think they are totally sb compatible and I don't think any 386 ear stuff supports the sb16 features. a sb pro 2.0 should also have a less noisy FM sound. A sb16 will work fine and give you the option of using the midi port for a MT-32 external module though so it really depends on your budget and if your going for FM sound or mt-32. if you want to go all out for sound I think your best option would be a SB pro 2.0 and a separate midi card for a Roland mt-32 but that's going to cost a bit. For video go with a Tseng Labs 4000 based card if you can. You can also throw a ISA SCSI card in there for a zippier hard drive and CD-ROM.

personally I don't use LCD's for vintage gaming but there's nothing wrong with doing so though I believe some older video cards may have issues syncing with them so you may have issues even getting certain cards to display. I do like flat screen CRT's though. I have this Gate way flat screen CRT from the mid early 2000's that gives a great image, unfortunitly itsa silver and the look clashes big time in a classic PC setup.

Jorg
September 9th, 2013, 10:35 AM
If you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a 486 as a gamer.

I fully agree with that, it will really give you more fun

Trixter
September 10th, 2013, 10:42 AM
Suggestions?

What games are you planning on running? A little of everything, or mostly adventures, or mostly action, etc.?

For "I'm not sure, I just want to play DOS games" as an answer, get a 486dx, any speed. They can be slowed down via both hardware (BIOS settings) and software (disable L1 cache) to slow it down for any game that doesn't run at native speeds. A 486 can play most games made between 1989 and 1995 without any trouble.