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View Full Version : Dual SATA Drives in Pentium - Urgent question



Springbok
October 10th, 2013, 07:39 AM
Hey guys,

I just bought this dual sata drive rack. Only after I bought it did I read that it requires windows XP or later. My plan was to put it in my vintage PC mod running windows 98. I already bought an IDE to dual SATA converter. Would it really require require XP or later to work? Sorry about the urgency, but I need to cancel the transaction if this is the case.

Thanks.

Rack

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NexStar-SE-Dual-2-5-SATA-Hard-Drive-Rack-Two-2-5-SATA-I-or-II-HD-or-SSD-/180777625319?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a172fa6e7

Converter

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400489056996?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Stone
October 10th, 2013, 07:56 AM
Why would you get SATA drives for a WIN98 system?

Old Thrashbarg
October 10th, 2013, 08:20 AM
That SATA rack is just a dumb passthrough device, it doesn't care about the OS.

However, that IDE->SATA converter you got is not a dual SATA device. One of the SATA ports is used for going IDE->SATA, and the other is for SATA->IDE. They can't be used simultaneously for hooking up two drives. So if you want to use two drives, you'll either need two of those things, or just go with a PCI SATA card (which would be a better option anyway, since those converter things often don't work very well).


Why would you get SATA drives for a WIN98 system?

For pretty much the same reasons you'd use SATA drives in any other system. And why does it matter? The OP wasn't asking about the merits of using SATA.

Stone
October 10th, 2013, 08:29 AM
That SATA rack is just a dumb passthrough device, it doesn't care about the OS.

However, that IDE->SATA converter you got is not a dual SATA device. One of the SATA ports is used for going IDE->SATA, and the other is for SATA->IDE. They can't be used simultaneously for hooking up two drives. So if you want to use two drives, you'll either need two of those things, or just go with a PCI SATA card (which would be a better option anyway, since those converter things often don't work very well).



For pretty much the same reasons you'd use SATA drives in any other system. And why does it matter? The OP wasn't asking about the merits of using SATA.What I was getting at was why you get drives for a system that requires the use of an adapter which as you so appropriately pointed out where I didn't 'often don't work very well' when an IDE would the job natively, without an adapter. The way I see it intermediate devices are just problems waiting to happen and should only be used if there is no other standard solution. Adapters are great if there are no other choices. KISS still rules!

Springbok
October 10th, 2013, 09:18 AM
Thank you for pointing that out. I was able to cancel the transactions for the IDE to SATA and ordered a PCI -> 4-port SATA controller card.

And to answer your question stone....

Pretty simple.

1) The cost of a SATA DVD writer and SATA HD's are MUCH less, and the selection is MUCH more varied than IDE DVD/HD.
2) I can install an OS on a SATA drive and plug which ever drive I want into the primary drive slot. I can have as many OS's and as many drives as I want and swap and choose as I like. Granted, I "could" set them up as dual boot, but this way, I only have to have 1 partition per drive. I think it will be a pretty cool setup.

glitch
October 10th, 2013, 09:18 AM
What I was getting at was why you get drives for a system that requires the use of an adapter which as you so appropriately pointed out where I didn't 'often don't work very well' when an IDE would the job natively, without an adapter. The way I see it intermediate devices are just problems waiting to happen and should only be used if there is no other standard solution. Adapters are great if there are no other choices. KISS still rules!

Probably because he wants the drives to be reliable without having to use a DDO or external IDE controller. IMO, the best way to go about this is to get a quality PCI SATA controller that is bootable. I've used several that have been tested down to MS-DOS 3.30. Try to avoid devices with cache or RAID. A quality, bootable SATA HBA will function just as a bootable PCI SCSI card, so as long as you don't care about the advanced features of the drive/controller, you should be able to boot DOS and Windows just fine.

k2x4b524[
October 10th, 2013, 09:36 AM
that or he's got a bunch of sata drives layin around and wants to use them XD

SomeGuy
October 10th, 2013, 09:41 AM
Windows 98 does not support hot plugging, at least not through IDE. If you don't plan on using hot plugging, then the drives would look like a standard IDE drive to the system.

If you need hot plugging, you will have to look at PCI SATA cards. Some of them have Windows 98 drivers, although it is not clear which ones (if any) support hot-plugging under Windows 98. (personally I am a fan of the VIA 6421 SATA cards because they have drivers for Windows *95*, but those don't do hot-plugging)

If you don't need hot plugging, I have found the Vantec Dual Port SATA to IDE Converter - Model CB-SP200 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812232020&Tpk=CB-SP200) works well for hard drives and CD drives. The advantage of these over a card is you need NO extra drivers, so any OS with IDE support will work.

It can be cheaper and easier to obtain SATA hard drives and CDs. Sometimes cheap enough to make an adapter or card worth it. Some of the later model "IDE" CD drives are actually SATA internally with an (often buggy) IDE converter chip on board.