PDA

View Full Version : What size HD is in your main machine?



Unknown_K
December 12th, 2013, 08:20 PM
Just curious what you guys are using for HDs on your main machine (OS and app drive not a dump drive).

I have been using a 250GB drive for a few years and recently swapped it for a 1TB HD. Seems like 1TB drives are super cheap at $55 or so shipped.

My largest dump drive is 4TB used for videos mostly, have a 2TB one I got a few years back still in use as well. Old gaming machines get the older 120-320GB HDs (mostly IDE and a few SATA). I think the 2TB model was before hard drive prices spiked.

Anybody still using old IDE drives as their main HD?

Compgeke
December 12th, 2013, 09:26 PM
I'm using a 500 GB Western Digital Blue SATA drive in my desktop.

I have a 160 GB Hitatchi 7.2k SATA drive in my laptop. I always run out of space on it however I don't have anything to replace it with at the moment.

Tor
December 12th, 2013, 09:44 PM
My desktop machine has a 350GB "system" disk and a 4TB disk for the rest (/home among that). It's not a "dump" disk, but I do keep a /mirror area there where I mirror stuff from the net just in case. But the other reason it's so large is that I process satellite data, and I also have a bunch of VMs running (clones of customer's systems) which need large data areas too. I expect to need more capacity in the not so far future.

-Tor

Ole Juul
December 12th, 2013, 11:21 PM
I've been using a 500GB disk for some time. My new computer, which I hope to be using for a long time, uses a Western Digital Black - WD5002AALX 500GB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5".

The thing is that operating systems and applications take up very little space by today's drive standards. It's all about how much of your archive that you want readily available in your home directory. In other words the ratio between your available files and your archived files. I recently added a 1TB Western Digital Red - WD10EFRX 1TB 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" mounted as /home/archive. I may add another one of those in the future, but don't see any way to use a main drive that is larger than 500GB. Even that is quite large, but I think 500 is at the best price/performance point at this point in time. I could use a 250GB drive (even less) and it would not make a noticeable difference to the way I use the computer.

luckybob
December 13th, 2013, 12:32 AM
4x 60gb sata3 ssd drives for OS and apps (raid 0)
4x 640gb WD-black for games/video recording/etc (raid 0)
1x 2tb dump disk

the speeds of sata-3 ssd drives is AMAZING. The technology is finally coming out of its infancy. Its a shame my machine only has a sata-2 controller, but it pegs it at maximum (1.2GB/s total) and when i eventually upgrade, i already have the drives. The WD blacks get a respectable 500mb/s so video editing is smooth and game load times are practically non-existent.

Mr.Amiga500
December 13th, 2013, 05:00 AM
I'm using 512Gb SSD (PCIe). I hate unreliable, noisy, hot hard drives. I don't even like to use them in my vintage computers. I've got flash drives in my Amiga, Atari, TRS-80. It's solid state all the way, baby.

JDT
December 13th, 2013, 05:31 AM
Main OS drive is Samsung 840 EVO 500GB SSD Mobo (DX58SO2) Marvell Sata3
Games drive is 2x 60GB SSD in RAID 0 hanging off of Adaptec 5805
"Data & Docs" drive is 2x 1TB Seagate somethingorother in RAID 1 hanging off of Adaptec 5805
"other games" drive 3x 250gb WD somethingorothers in RAID 0 hanging off of Adaptec 5805
SSD caching drive for the 3disk raid 0 hanging off of Adaptec 5805

My Home server has 3x 4TB drives in a RAID 5 hanging off of Adaptec 31205, I will have to OCE in another 4TB disk when my last Terrabubble is used up...

Jack.
December 13th, 2013, 06:03 AM
Main (REMTech):
OS [W7]: Seagate ST500DM002-1BD142 -500GB - SATA
OS [Arch64]: Seagate ST3500630AS - 500GB - SATA
Backup: Verbatim - Toshiba MK5055GSX - 500GB - USB 2.0
Secondary: Digitus - Seagate (something) - 500GB - 2x USB 2.0
WTB: Tandberg RDX - Cart. - SATA

Server (SunFire):
OS: Seagate Barracuda ATA 5 - 200GB - IDE/ATA

Client (SunRay):
Diskless

Agent Orange
December 13th, 2013, 06:23 AM
I'm currently using 2 WD 600 GB (10K RPM) Velociraptors, one of which is a cloned backup. Also, I have a 2 TB Seagate Barracuda in a USB caddy which I use for archiving and Windows OS Images. I don't trust RAID setups any more. Somewhere down the line I'm going to replace the WD's with a solid state drive(s) - haven't made my mind up on exactly how that's going to go down yet. My 'main' machine is my gaming machine.

Trixter
December 13th, 2013, 07:39 AM
Just curious what you guys are using for HDs on your main machine (OS and app drive not a dump drive).


I use a 256GB SSD for my boot and app drive, and a 4-disk RAID-5 for all other data and work (with a 5th disk as a hot spare).

Old Thrashbarg
December 13th, 2013, 08:10 AM
I have a 146GB 15K SAS drive for the OS and some core programs, and larger stuff (mostly games and whatnot) is installed on a 500GB WD Velociraptor.

I've also got 1TB, 2TB and 640GB drives for general storage, a few 500GB and 1TB external drives for things I don't need to access very often, and finally a 6TB NAS for everything I need to share between computers.

Caluser2000
December 13th, 2013, 11:04 AM
Just curious what you guys are using for HDs on your main machine (OS and app drive not a dump drive).37.2 gig ide drive.

bear
December 13th, 2013, 11:53 AM
4x 4TB, mirrored (8 TB usable).

Trixter
December 13th, 2013, 12:04 PM
This is starting to feel like a pissing contest. Okay, I'll add to what I wrote previously: In addition to main desktop 4T RAID-5, I have a 4T RAID-5 NAS, both have hot spares, and both are backed up offsite (1200 miles away from my current location) automatically. My house could turn into a smoking hole in the ground and I wouldn't lose any data that is important to me.

(I'm sure the next post will talk about someone's LTO-6 tape library in their outdoor shed, or someone's holographic storage, or the 12-disk SAS storage appliance...)

Unknown_K
December 13th, 2013, 01:21 PM
I have yet to try a SSD drive, people with laptops swear by them. The last 2 1TB HDs I purchased were around $55 shipped on sale, figured that would be the sweet spot these days.

Trixter I am still using LTO-1 for backups as well as DDS2/3/4, AIT-2, DLT depending on the system.

Trixter
December 13th, 2013, 03:14 PM
I have yet to try a SSD drive, people with laptops swear by them.

Laptops or desktops, there is a massive difference between being able to complete 200 IOPS vs. 60000 IOPS. On a regular SATA drive, Windows 7 took 6-7 minutes to boot; after migrating to an SSD, it takes 45 seconds. Applications load an order of magnitude faster.

Rick Ethridge
December 13th, 2013, 04:31 PM
One 1 Terabyte Seagate. It's been used for three years sparingly.

barythrin
December 13th, 2013, 04:41 PM
Main systems been dead for a while (new motherboard loves to run at some stupidly slow speed taking OS installs 2-3 hours to fail before I try again then get tired of trying).. but dunno I have a few several TB drives that are full laying around waiting to get reconnected.

Been meaning to do a raid-5 2 or 3TB setup but need data up first then I'll debate the undesirable cost. But that's what I'm using to archive software and also my dvds so the kids don't ruin them after a watch or two.

PeterNC
December 14th, 2013, 11:07 AM
My W520 came with a 500GB SATA but I have installed a 256GB or 128GB SSD now (my memory fails me). My W500 and W510 have low 100s GB SATAs. I use DVDs for backup.

I use a 360MB HDD in my ValuePoint and connect my other desktops to it with a LapLink or IPX to play games.

Shadow Lord
December 14th, 2013, 03:26 PM
Currently in my non-working main system:

• Main work Station
○ Areca ARC-1680ix-12
512MB Cache (DDR2 667 240PIN)
3 x IPC-BR-SAS34-D1 SAS 2.0 Hot Swap Bays
OL I - Boot RAID 5
9) Seagate Cheetah 15K.6 ST3450856SS
10) Seagate Cheetah 15K.7 ST3450857SS
11) Seagate Cheetah 15K.6 ST3450856SS
12) Seagate Cheetah 15K.6 ST3450856SS
OL II - Data RAID 5
1) Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 ST31000340AS
2) Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 ST31000340AS
3) Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 ST31000340AS
4) Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 ST31000528AS

There is room for another four drives for further expansion.

I am also with Trixter on off site backup through a commercial provider. There is another 7.5TB in my main server (maxed out) and the NAS has another 7TB with drive bays free so it can grow to ~84TB as needed.

Tiberian Fiend
December 14th, 2013, 04:17 PM
Two 750 GB WD Caviar Black drives in a RAID 0 array, which is then split with about 1.2 TB for Win7 and 300 GB for WinXP.

Agent Orange
December 14th, 2013, 04:19 PM
Main systems been dead for a while (new motherboard loves to run at some stupidly slow speed taking OS installs 2-3 hours to fail before I try again then get tired of trying).. but dunno I have a few several TB drives that are full laying around waiting to get reconnected.

Been meaning to do a raid-5 2 or 3TB setup but need data up first then I'll debate the undesirable cost. But that's what I'm using to archive software and also my dvds so the kids don't ruin them after a watch or two.

What's the mobo and CPU? Also, what kind of RAM and how much?

Mr.Amiga500
December 14th, 2013, 06:08 PM
Laptops or desktops, there is a massive difference between being able to complete 200 IOPS vs. 60000 IOPS. On a regular SATA drive, Windows 7 took 6-7 minutes to boot; after migrating to an SSD, it takes 45 seconds. Applications load an order of magnitude faster.

What?? 6-7 minutes to boot? That's insane. Even 45 seconds is painfully slow. I mean - this is almost 2014! My 1987 Amiga 500 fully boots in 15 seconds. I can boot, connect to the internet, check my email and shut down in 45 seconds.

My new Mac with SSD can finally match the 15 second boot up time. That's my new minimum tolerable boot time: 15 second startup, 2 second shutdown.

Ole Juul
December 14th, 2013, 06:30 PM
What?? 6-7 minutes to boot? That's insane. Even 45 seconds is painfully slow. I mean - this is almost 2014! My 1987 Amiga 500 fully boots in 15 seconds. I can boot, connect to the internet, check my email and shut down in 45 seconds.

My new Mac with SSD can finally match the 15 second boot up time. That's my new minimum tolerable boot time: 15 second startup, 2 second shutdown.

How many power failures do you get? That's the only time I do a reboot unless I'm doing some configuration where I can't restart a service otherwise. That said, "booting" does not have an obvious definition. Loading 50 web pages and miscellaneous web services could easily be part of what has to happen until the computer is ready for you to use - which is what I call "booted". You could also call getting to the point where you are ready to start a program "booting", but that doesn't count in my books. I've seen machines take 5 minutes to get even to that point though, notably old MS-Windows boxes, but I don't think that's insane. I think that's hilarious.

Anyway, does read speed of the main drive really contribute much to "getting to ready"? I would have thought it would be processor speed, and as mentioned above, possibly network speed. Of course if your main drive is audio cassette, then I take that back. :)

Mr.Amiga500
December 14th, 2013, 06:47 PM
I shut down every time I'm finished using the computer. I've noticed that even with the latest computers running the latest operating systems, things still get corrupted/screwed up if you don't occasionally reboot. It's unbelievable, but true. (just yesterday I was having weird graphical corruption that didn't go away until I rebooted)

That's why I want the fastest possible boot times.

Andrew T.
December 15th, 2013, 09:41 AM
My main desktop computer was outfitted with a 10GB hard drive. Last year I added a 30GB drive I had lying around, for a total of 40GB.

And if I didn't work with digital photos and music, I wouldn't need more than a tenth of that space.

Shadow Lord
December 15th, 2013, 12:41 PM
My main desktop computer was outfitted with a 10GB hard drive. Last year I added a 30GB drive I had lying around, for a total of 40GB.

And if I didn't work with digital photos and music, I wouldn't need more than a tenth of that space.

What OS and processor are you running? It seems to me that the OP should have asked those questions as well. HDD size by itself is not really an indicator of things.

For example 40 GB was gargantuan in the DOS/Win3.x era, average in the Win2K/XP era, and below average these days specially when a 1TB drive could be had for $50 or 128GB SSD for about the same price.

Unknown_K
December 15th, 2013, 12:55 PM
I asked about your main work machine, not the vintage tuff you play around with. My main rig isn't even the newest in the house (Opteron 180 socket 939) but I use it for email, web use, download storage, etc. I have better machines for Netflix, servers, gaming.

Digital photos and videos take up quite a bit of space driving normal PC users to get bigger HDs, just like the web/flash/HD video made the casual computer user upgrade their hardware (and made gamers mostly jump to consoles).

Shadow Lord
December 15th, 2013, 01:05 PM
I asked about your main work machine, not the vintage tuff you play around with. My main rig isn't even the newest in the house (Opteron 180 socket 939) but I use it for email, web use, download storage, etc. I have better machines for Netflix, servers, gaming.

Yes, but even if that is Andrew T's main machine it would be more informative to know in general what his main machine is. Know HDD sizes alone is not really indicative of the whole picture as I imagine some people have pretty "old" (by computer standards) HW as their main machine based on these HDD sizes.

Unknown_K
December 15th, 2013, 01:24 PM
Sure I wouldn't mind knowing what hardware and OS they use, but I started this thread after contemplating how much space I needed on my main machine and was wondering what the norm was around here. I used to get by with 80GB drives a few years back until I started storing 720P encoded TV shows on my machine for later viewing (1GB+ for 42 minutes). One of the reasons I got a bunch of LTO drives and tape was to store my favorite shows. While drivers and PDF files have grown in size over the years it is video that takes up the most space these days. If I didn't use this machine for short term storage (the 4TB hd in the lab is for longer term storage) I could get by with 200GB drives like I had.

High_Treason
December 15th, 2013, 02:39 PM
Hmm, this makes a change, looks like I'm on the bigger end of the scale, specs nobody cares about;


Intel Pentium D 2.80GHz (ES - QKDH?)
4GB DDR2-667 (800MHz, board doesn't go this fast)
nVidia GTX 460 1GB
Windows XP Pro SP3 and Windows 7 Ultimate x64, originally ran Whistler
SoundBlaster Audigy 2 ZS Platinum
Intensity Pro
Liquid cooled


The hard drives are elaborate, need a list of their own;

4x1TB Samsung SATA-II Drives
2x2TB WD Caviar Black Drives in RAID0 for capturing video (Uncompressed, 10-Bit 720p60 usually - 1GB per ~30sec)
2x250GB WD Caviar IDE drives, a surviving relic of the days of having 12x250GB drives were installed when it was new.


It'll be 9 next year, but hell, it's done 1080i, Crysis 2 DX11 and quite a lot of other stuff, had a good run but it'll soon be time to replace it with a Xeon E3 1270v3 based machine if I could only find an adequate case... Oh, and I have to buy a mixer, bunch of converter boxes and all manner of things to do what I could do with this machine from day 1 thanks to the "improvements" in Windows 7, Win 7 is only installed on this machine so I could learn how to use it (with Classic Shell installed though) - bloody useless OS, never liked XP either, seems they remove more functionality with every version, even simple things like the browse for folder window not remembering the last directory you used annoy me to no end in Windows 7.

Bit of trivia, I got the CPU and mobo ahead of release through a connection I had at that time, no PSU was yet large enough to power the machine so I designed my own and had it built by a small company - if you ever wondered why linear power supplies aren't used in the PC/Workstation world, there are a million good reasons for it, I can assure you. Oh, my CPU doesn't have full SSE3 support either, I guess Intel hadn't fully implemented it by this time.

I actually have a Core2 Doodoo based machine that I use for streaming to Twitch.TV but it's motherboard is RM OEM junk and I always found the Core2 slower with video editing somehow.

Andrew T.
December 15th, 2013, 02:44 PM
What OS and processor are you running?

My main machine to this day is a Pentium III with Windows 95. As it happens, my only newer computer is a Celeron laptop with less capacity. (20GB, to be precise.)

Caluser2000
December 15th, 2013, 07:02 PM
I like it. Kinda puts things in perspective. This XP P4 something Asire Apire box I use every day runs VMs, browsers yadda yadda fine with the drive size I mentioned. Only 512megs of ram too. Was hoping it would've died a horrible death well before now. Oh well here's hoping.

Shadow Lord
December 15th, 2013, 08:42 PM
My main machine to this day is a Pentium III with Windows 95. As it happens, my only newer computer is a Celeron laptop with less capacity. (20GB, to be precise.)

Sort of what I expected given the drive sizes. I mean the machine is not capable of handling 720P video well, it is not a power house of gaming, and probably can not do everything on the internet but it works superbly well with the correct time period SW (Win95, Office 95, etc.) and will get you through 99% of your day to day computer needs (word processing, email, web browsing, etc.). So why have more then 40-60GB of HDD space? My Win95 machine had a 1gig SCSI HDD and it worked just fine.

Mad-Mike
December 19th, 2013, 08:18 AM
My main box, a Pentium D 3.4GHz I tossed together out of new and used parts in 2008, and running Windows 7 64-bit, has a 1TB boot drive split into 2 partitions of 500GB each.

My drive setup in that beast is insane
IDE - 80GB WD - used for archival/backup purposes
SATA
0 = 1TB 3.5" Seagate split into 2 500GB Partitions
1 = 160GB 3.5" WD split into a ton of partitions, was the drive I used when I built the computer back in 2008
2 = 160GB 2.5" Toshiba - used for graphics, and documents
3 = 80GB 2.5" Toshiba - used for my music recordings and video archival

Most of my computers have ridiculously huge drives for the main drive....I stow away so much stuff and lately have been moving to using virtualized CD-ROM stuff for even my old boxes to save wear on my optical media.

486 = 8GB Seagate, and I have an 80...that's right EIGHTY Gigabyte drive getting prepped for it
286 = 540MB Seagate, put everything on it that'll run on a 286, and still have over 200MB left
Tandy 1000 = 540MB Seagate, same exact drive as the 286 has, except this one has over 400MB left over ATM

k2x4b524[
December 19th, 2013, 04:22 PM
My main machine has a 3tb Seagate Barracude as its primary drive, split simply into 2.2tb and 800gb because I use BIOS and not UEFI. The 2.2 is my main partition, the 800gb left over is my data storage.
It's second hard drive is a 250gb WD Blue. This drive is split into my page file partition which maxes at 12gb, and the rest is where I store my laptop backup.

I have a 750gb SSHD from my laptop, that I pulled when I installed my 64gb msata ssd *with adapter as the M400 doesn't natively support msata*. the SSHD will soon be taking place of the 250 as my games drive and page file partition.

My old 1.5 Seagate barracuda is currently homeless. It's going into a gateway that I am putting together for my online university experiences.

All drives are sata 2 and 3 and are in perfect shape.

deathshadow
December 19th, 2013, 09:23 PM
I'm booting off a 256 gig SSD, but the system has 12tb of HDD's in it. The SSD is strictly for read mostly-boot, given that repeated write-wise they have the reliability of a 1987 Yugo GV (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcMSiqo3g7k).

I just gave myself an early Christmas present with a system rebuild -- new mobo, vid and some drives... so now it's:

i7 4770k
ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Motherboard (3x SLI capable)
16 gigs (2x8) G'Skill Ares DDR3 2400
8 gigs (2x4) G'Skill Sniper DDR3 2400 (from old build)
Gigabyte Windforce GTX 780 OC 3 gig
256 gig SandDisk Ultra Plus SSD
2x 4tb Seagate
2x 2tb Hitachi (from old build)
Blu-ray Burner
Thermaltake TR2 950 Watt "gold" rated PSU (from old build)
Thermaltake Element G case (from old build)
Phanteks PH-TC14PE CPU cooler

Hooked up to the displays I already had:
Potalion 27" 2560x1440 IPS Display
2x Samsung 24" 1920x1200 LCD Displays

...and of course my Model M keyboard and Logitech Trackman Marble+ USB (the old white one!) -- Nothing like a twenty five year old keyboard and decade and a half old mouse on a bleeding edge build.

The previous build was an i7 870, 16 gigs RAM (2x4 1600 and 2x4 2400, running at 1333) and a pair of GTX 260 in SLI.

It's also fun having a Tandy 1000 SX, IIe Platinum and Mac IISE the next desk over from it.

Also putting together a SteamBox with parts from my junk bin -- I know my cup doth runneth over when the parts bin yielded a i7 920, Asus P6T Deluxe Mobo, 9 gigs of RAM, and a 1tb Hibachi. Adding a nVidia GTX 650TI Boost to it, gonna dual boot to Win 7 for gaming. Might even quintuple boot... SteamOS, OSX, Win7, Haiku, and Mint. Lord knows I've got enough sub 1tb SATA drives I could give each their own instead of trying to get OSX and SteamOS to 'play nice' with everything else.

Mr.Amiga500
December 20th, 2013, 01:40 AM
...and of course my Model M keyboard and Logitech Trackman Marble+ USB (the old white one!) -- Nothing like a twenty five year old keyboard and decade and a half old mouse on a bleeding edge build.

Yes, a 25 year old keyboard is good... but a 36 year old one is better :p. I'm using an IBM 3278 terminal keyboard, along with a two decade old CH products trackball - attached to a top of the line, two month old MacBook Pro.

(Why use an external keyboard with a notebook? Modern notebook keyboards suck! It's sad that a 1983 TRS-80 Model 100 (one of the first "notebooks") has a much better keyboard than a late 2013 MacBook Pro.)

Agent Orange
December 20th, 2013, 06:49 AM
I'm booting off a 256 gig SSD, but the system has 12tb of HDD's in it. The SSD is strictly for read mostly-boot, given that repeated write-wise they have the reliability of a 1987 Yugo GV (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcMSiqo3g7k).

I just gave myself an early Christmas present with a system rebuild -- new mobo, vid and some drives... so now it's:

i7 4770k
ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Motherboard (3x SLI capable)
16 gigs (2x8) G'Skill Ares DDR3 2400
8 gigs (2x4) G'Skill Sniper DDR3 2400 (from old build)
Gigabyte Windforce GTX 780 OC 3 gig
256 gig SandDisk Ultra Plus SSD
2x 4tb Seagate
2x 2tb Hitachi (from old build)
Blu-ray Burner
Thermaltake TR2 950 Watt "gold" rated PSU (from old build)
Thermaltake Element G case (from old build)
Phanteks PH-TC14PE CPU cooler

Hooked up to the displays I already had:
Potalion 27" 2560x1440 IPS Display
2x Samsung 24" 1920x1200 LCD Displays

...and of course my Model M keyboard and Logitech Trackman Marble+ USB (the old white one!) -- Nothing like a twenty five year old keyboard and decade and a half old mouse on a bleeding edge build.

The previous build was an i7 870, 16 gigs RAM (2x4 1600 and 2x4 2400, running at 1333) and a pair of GTX 260 in SLI.

It's also fun having a Tandy 1000 SX, IIe Platinum and Mac IISE the next desk over from it.

Also putting together a SteamBox with parts from my junk bin -- I know my cup doth runneth over when the parts bin yielded a i7 920, Asus P6T Deluxe Mobo, 9 gigs of RAM, and a 1tb Hibachi. Adding a nVidia GTX 650TI Boost to it, gonna dual boot to Win 7 for gaming. Might even quintuple boot... SteamOS, OSX, Win7, Haiku, and Mint. Lord knows I've got enough sub 1tb SATA drives I could give each their own instead of trying to get OSX and SteamOS to 'play nice' with everything else.

Good job on that build! Smacks of major bucks. How were your able to sneak all of that by your significant other without getting clobbered? :xmas:

Agent Orange
December 20th, 2013, 06:53 AM
Sort of what I expected given the drive sizes. I mean the machine is not capable of handling 720P video well, it is not a power house of gaming, and probably can not do everything on the internet but it works superbly well with the correct time period SW (Win95, Office 95, etc.) and will get you through 99% of your day to day computer needs (word processing, email, web browsing, etc.). So why have more then 40-60GB of HDD space? My Win95 machine had a 1gig SCSI HDD and it worked just fine.

Well,
1. Because you can.
2. They're cheap, plentiful, and readily available.

Unknown_K
December 20th, 2013, 11:52 AM
I tend to hoard smaller drives as well. You don't need an 80GB HD for an early Windows 95 build (fat16 can't use it anyway). The major benefit of having a bigger drive is they tend to be faster anyway.

Chuck(G)
December 20th, 2013, 01:58 PM
This system uses a 500GB SATA; backup is a 2TB e-SATA and holds a bunch of tar files.

Stone
December 20th, 2013, 02:27 PM
You don't need an 80GB HD for an early Windows 95 build (fat16 can't use it anyway).I dunno... what about 40 2GB partitions? :-)

Unknown_K
December 20th, 2013, 05:15 PM
When you are dealing with DOS and 2GB partition limits I just go SCSI anyway and use 2-4GB drives.

Chuck(G)
December 20th, 2013, 05:19 PM
So, would anyone be interested in a network redirector for large drives? That is, you boot from a 32MB primary partition and the rest of the drive is accessible via device driver.

Has this bee done already?

Shadow Lord
December 20th, 2013, 06:01 PM
Well,
1. Because you can.
2. They're cheap, plentiful, and readily available.

Can't get cheaper then free (i.e. sticking with what you have and not upgrading) and I am not sure how easy it is to get a 2TB drive to work with Win9x.... Haven't tried and don't plan to!

Shadow Lord
December 20th, 2013, 06:02 PM
So, would anyone be interested in a network redirector for large drives? That is, you boot from a 32MB primary partition and the rest of the drive is accessible via device driver.

Has this bee done already?

Didn't we do this in another thread? ;)

Chuck(G)
December 20th, 2013, 06:03 PM
Didn't we do this in another thread? ;)

We talked about it, but I don't recall anyone actually doing one.

Shadow Lord
December 20th, 2013, 06:24 PM
We talked about it, but I don't recall anyone actually doing one.

Actually while talking about it in the other thread I did find something that was an "attempt" at using the redirector interface. I thought I had posted the link but here it is again (http://www.os2museum.com/wp/?p=1242). There is a early program (Phantom) available on that site that I believe uses the redirector interface to setup a RAM disk. While the interface is interesting, I usually tend to have my older/vintage machines networkable so that I have an immensely large drive (my NAS) available to DOS through a mapped drive letter. I guess if your system is not networked and you wanted a big drive the interface would allow you to do it without using a partition manager.

I am more interested in Mike's full boot off of a network drive program for the vintage PCs.

deathshadow
December 20th, 2013, 09:25 PM
How were your able to sneak all of that by your significant other without getting clobbered? :xmas:
I kicked her out seven months ago... seven months and two weeks ago I got a medical malpractice settlement... Hmm? Coincidence?

... and suddenly VERY glad I only did ring one, not ring two.

[Chris]
March 27th, 2014, 09:50 PM
2010 MacBook Pro 13": 1TB Western Digital Scorpio Blue SATA HDD (equal size partitions for both OS X Mavericks & Windows 8)
2006 iMac 17" : 1TB Western Digital Caviar Green SATA HDD

You might find it amusing that 1TB is STILL not enough disk space for me, almost have 50% of the iMac's HDD filled up, and 75% full on both partitions on the MBP's HDD...

I have a stack of old IDE HDD's, one as small as 4GB and one as large as 200GB, most of them are 20GB and 40GB HDD's, a few 60GB and 80GB HDD's as well..