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linmarent
December 28th, 2013, 08:42 PM
Hello, in my business I come across a lot of old, vintage equipment but this is the first time I've come across something like this. After hours of unfruitful Google searches, I joined to see if anyone can help me identify what exactly it is. Is says ITT Courier 7601. It is heavy, like 40 pounds.

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It also came with these ITT 2068C Data Modems. This might be a silly question, but are these really just modems? They are bigger than my desktop!

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Thank you in advance for any information.

NeXT
December 28th, 2013, 09:48 PM
It's quite obvious that the blue boxes are very old modems.
Going on a stretch but like IBM's terminal controllers ITT marketed a devices that let you attach multiple modems to one controller that linked to the computer using a high bandwidth line?

Photos of the back might be a bit useful as well to figure out what interfaces they used.

Chuck(G)
December 28th, 2013, 10:10 PM
Sometime in the 70s, ITT bought Courier Terminal Systems of Tempe, AZ. What you have there looks like a concentrator, with of course, some modems--my guess is that these are probably Bell 208-type modems.

Sadly, there's very little preserved material for telecomm equipment from that time. I couldn't even find a photo of a Bell 208 modem. I remember the old rack-mount Milgo modems (before they were acquired by Racal)--they were big.

At any rate, sniff around these units--you can probably get a manufacture date--for example, in the top box, I see a Shugart 5.25" floppy drive (probably SA-400 or like). There are probably some alumni of Courier kicking around on the web--maybe you could hook with some.

g4ugm
December 28th, 2013, 11:22 PM
At first I thought it was a some kind of test equipment, but if it has multiple outputs then perhaps a Statistical Multiplexor. It might be worth asking on the GreenKeys list, they specialize in Teletype equipment but there are telecoms guys on there...

linmarent
December 29th, 2013, 05:34 PM
Thanks so much guys! I'm sorry I forgot back pictures.

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I've also attached a picture of a keyboard that came with them. Not sure if it goes to them but it is by far the heaviest keyboard I've ever seen. It also came with 2 dataphones.

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Chuck, thanks for the idea. I'll check around the insides more. I've been itching to open the blue ones so this is a good excuse. ;)

Dave, I'll check into GreenKeys.

Thanks again!

NeXT
December 29th, 2013, 06:24 PM
That's a keyboard for a 3270 series terminal so without a doubt the 7601 is a third party terminal controller.

g4ugm
December 29th, 2013, 11:10 PM
That makes sense. The BNC sockets numbered 10 thru 17 were for attaching 3270 screens and the RS232 socket above went to the Modem. The whole lot then connected to the mainframe. With a 3270 you can edit a whole page in the terminal and then send it to the mainframe in one chunk. For data entry you can define areas of the screen to be form fields and set them as numeric or alpha and so do so basic data verification in the screen controller.

Pity you don't have any of the old 3274 screens they were nice. I am also sorry to say that this stuff is probably of no interest to any one, even a museum, as you need a real mainframe to use it...

Might be worth trying the Computer History Museum...

Compgeke
December 30th, 2013, 02:31 AM
If the keyboard is original IBM that may have some value to the keyboard collecting crowd (deskthority\geekhack).

If the bottom says something about being made by IBM in Canada then it's a true IBM but if not it's still quite interesting as I've never seen a clone that looks that close if it is a clone.

mc68010
December 30th, 2013, 02:50 PM
If the keyboard is original IBM that may have some value to the keyboard collecting crowd (deskthority\geekhack).

They are not really a keyboard collecting crowd. More a keyboard destroying crowd. They will rip out all the keys for use on custom built windows keyboards.

g4ugm
December 30th, 2013, 03:01 PM
They are not really a keyboard collecting crowd. More a keyboard destroying crowd. They will rip out all the keys for use on custom built windows keyboards.

I have never seen any one do such a thing. They do seem to go mad over the original IBM Model-M keyboard which I find so clunky and horrible. The later 3174 keyboards can be used on a PC as per:-

http://www.seasip.info/VintagePC/ibm_1390876.html

I have some Nokia 122-Key keyboards from 3270 compatible terminals as described here:-

http://www.quadibloc.com/comp/scan.htm

so no need to take them apart, just plug them in, load up a translation table and away you go...


..

Chuck(G)
December 30th, 2013, 03:30 PM
Didn't Fujitsu also offer similar terminals for their IBM (EBCIDC) ish systems? IIRC, they didn't use BNC connectors, but rather an odd biaxial connector with a D-shaped recess. I don't know what they're called.

Compgeke
December 31st, 2013, 11:48 AM
They are not really a keyboard collecting crowd. More a keyboard destroying crowd. They will rip out all the keys for use on custom built windows keyboards.

Eh, not quite the case for most people. The only ones to really loose keys are the Toshiba T series thanks to their Alps keycaps which no one makes custom.

the "Beamspring" keyboards are in fairly high demand thanks to http://deskthority.net/workshop-f7/beamspring-usb-controller-t6044.html (which is non-destructive).

ts99349
December 2nd, 2014, 01:06 PM
I used to work for ITT Courier back in 1982-1983. It was my first real job. The 7601 controller connected to IBM 3270 display terminals or to ITT Courier's version of the terminal. The 7601 would have a modem connection to the mainframe.