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falter
January 30th, 2014, 12:38 PM
Hey guys,

So I am pretty much decided on a attempting to do a 'replica' of the Don Lancaster design TV Typewriter. I have been getting more and more fascinated with PCB fabrication, and I think, even if I don't end up with a perfectly functional unit, it'd still be a great learning experience. I've always kind of had mixed feelings about replicas, but in this case because people could elect to build their own from scratch using only the plans from the magazines, my mind isn't classifying it as pure replica.

I have some questions for more experienced hands though.

1) What PCB stock would get me closest to what someone would have had in 1973, esp. in terms of appearance?
2) I notice in photos of period-made TVTs, the traces end up being a kind of silver color rather than copper..?
3) Is there any likelihood of finding most of the correct, original chips used? I understand some were already scarce back when this project was created and I imagine have only gotten harder to locate since then. If you guys have any good sources for the rarest bits I'm all ears.
4) I have seen two distinct keyboards used with the original TVT -- the one shown on the cover of RE, and the weird 'blue circles' kind that I understand is on the prototype (I think they called it 'Surplus' -- is that a brand or?). Anyone have any recommendations on how I might source one of the two, or something appropriate to the period?

Think that's it for now. I plan on doing a video documentary of the whole thing. For me it's about as close to going back in time as one can get.

falter
January 30th, 2014, 12:44 PM
Here's one IC I've already bought:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Signetics-2513N-Character-Generator-NOS-RARE-/321302036738?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4acf180102

I don't know what the difference is between 2513 (as specified in the magazine) and 2513N. But the date code is allegedly 1973, which lines up well, and I assume it's not that different, if at all from what Don Lancaster specifies.

daver2
February 1st, 2014, 01:30 PM
The silver colour is tin plating over the copper. Bare copper will tarnish over time and will become difficult to solder. Production PCBs were generally tin plated. If you decide to make your own PCBs - and you do the construction soon after etching - the tin plating is not strictly necessary. You can, however, by chemicals to tin plate the bare copper after etching if that is a must.

Dave

daver2
February 1st, 2014, 01:38 PM
PS:

The 2513 is a 'generic' number.

The 2513N is a plastic DIP package.
The 2513I is a ceramic DIP package.

The same silicon 'logic' can be encapsulated into different packages (hence the additional suffixes).

You should also be aware that there were custom versions of the 2513 that could be programmed to user's specifications. There should be another identifying mark on your package. CM2140 is the 'bog standard' ASCII character set. CMxxxx (where XXXX is anything else other than 2140) implies that the character generator contents is probably not what you are expecting!

Dave

falter
February 7th, 2014, 12:49 PM
PS:

The 2513 is a 'generic' number.

The 2513N is a plastic DIP package.
The 2513I is a ceramic DIP package.

The same silicon 'logic' can be encapsulated into different packages (hence the additional suffixes).

You should also be aware that there were custom versions of the 2513 that could be programmed to user's specifications. There should be another identifying mark on your package. CM2140 is the 'bog standard' ASCII character set. CMxxxx (where XXXX is anything else other than 2140) implies that the character generator contents is probably not what you are expecting!

Dave

I got my 2513s in today. They are CM3030. According to the datasheet info I can find online, Signetics refers to it as: Old ASCII Character Generator, Upper Case, 7X5, Horizontal Scan -- the only difference I can see between it and CM2140 is the word 'old'. I don't see a CM number anywhere in the original TV Typewriter specs.. not in the parts list anyway.. re-reading the article.

Just for kicks, I took out one of the chips and swapped it for the 2513 that's on my Apple II rev 04 board.. worked as normal.. don't know if that tells us anything..

falter
March 9th, 2014, 09:56 PM
So I'm working on acquiring parts for my TV Typewriter project. I'm having a bit of a hard time understanding what I need parts wise. For example, for the main transformer, the magazine specifies: Dual 12v center tapped secondaries, 1.5a, signal 24-1a.. I've tried some searches but I'm not seeing anything with exactly those specs.. wondering if there's anything out there I can use to educate myself a bit on transformers so I can understand what to search for or what modern day equivalent would be acceptable.

modem7
March 9th, 2014, 10:41 PM
Dual 12v center tapped secondaries
That equates to:

http://www.minuszerodegrees.net/images4/Transformer_dual_12V_center_tapped.jpg


1.5a
The load will draw up to 1.5 amps from each secondary. Therefore, when seeking the above transformer, look for one that can handle 1.5 amps, or more, being drawn from each of the secondaries.


signal 24-1a
???

Chuck(G)
March 9th, 2014, 11:14 PM
I do have the manual for the SWTP PSU kit that came with the CT1024. I think dual 12VCT secondaries would make for a lot of excess heat. Even the SWTP PSU was a bit underpowered. Those 2102s are pretty power-hungry and ran hot.

But I've already said this somewhere else on another TVT thread...

falter
March 11th, 2014, 10:25 AM
Yeah... I'm trying to get as authentic as possible on this one though. But some of the parts in the parts list are a bit unclear. I know nothing about transformers so it was a bit of a toughie understanding what all that meant. I have no idea what the 24-1A meant either. Wish I could just find an example part number someone used to work with. Easier to compare for us rookies.

falter
March 11th, 2014, 10:41 AM
Here are the ICs I've acquired so far (and have a few others in my inventory from previous purchases):

17712

A few vintage chips in there.. the char gens are 1973, couple other chips are 73 74 vintage. The idea is to get what I need to get it running, and then over time find date-correct replacements. I'm going with socketing the chips.. I'm assuming that will be fine?

For the basic design, I'm going with the original prototype. Haven't had much luck on the keyboard for that, but I did score some teletype keys:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/320552452076?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2648

All the same key 'REPT', but I think are generally the right shape and could be repainted? I'm wondering if that's what was done on the prototype? None of the keys on that unit have lettering. Letters are placed on the black plastic (?) surround. I understand that keyboard was an actual keypunch keyboard of some kind (still not clear on model -- Don said EBCDIC but that's just the encoding type?). It may turn into a hybrid situation maybe where I have to borrow a keyboard design from elsewhere (like the earlier 73 article Don did with the custom made key switches) and then put those keytops atop it.

Going to buy the wood anyway and build the case so I have that to motivate me. It looks like he covered the wood with some kind of wallpaper/decorative covering?

Here's a closeup shot: http://www.computerhistory.org/revolution/personal-computers/17/296/1135

Was going to ask Don again but I don't want to wear out my welcome peppering him with questions. :)

falter
April 2nd, 2014, 08:52 AM
Got my teletype keytops today:

18103

Was lots of fun removing all those from their single packages. :) The plan is to paint them the solid blue and red like the TV Typewriter prototype. I've not been able to find the actual keyboard/PCB that Lancaster used, so I'm thinking my best bet may be to try to recreate the keyboard project he did in an earlier Radio Electronics article and then modify it to have these keytops. I'm not sure how I'll make the stalks for these keytops yet. Probably use styrene cylinders and then glue them in place.

Actually thinking about building the case first, just to provide motivation and something to look at. Still soliciting opinions on the construction of the case in the link above. Really would like to know what that 'covering' material over the main body parts are.

Chuck(G)
April 2nd, 2014, 01:32 PM
I do have the SWTP construction guide for Lancaster's keyboard for the TVT. It includes a "shadow" PCB layout showing component locations, if that's any help. The tough part is that it used two RTL ICs--MC789. They're pretty thin on the ground, aren't they?

falter
April 2nd, 2014, 07:34 PM
http://www.swtpc.com/mholley/RadioElectronics/Feb1973/RE_Feb_1973_pg57.jpg

Is this what you are referring to? It doesnt seem to mention any ICs.. but right now there are a ton of mc789. Matt Holley's site posted the construction details for the tv typewriter itself (including foil patterns). Havent found one for the keyboard yet.

Chuck(G)
April 2nd, 2014, 08:30 PM
No, this was in Popular Electronics in a 1974 article titled "A low-cost, fully professional ASCII Keyboard and Encoder you can build". Like the TVT, this was picked up by SWTP and sold to accompany the TVT. The hex-inverter MC789s are used as output buffers as well as some wired-OR logic.

Believe it or not, Don still has the article online in his tinaja.com site here (http://www.tinaja.com/glib/asciikbd.pdf)

MikeS
April 2nd, 2014, 09:22 PM
No, this was in Popular Electronics in a 1974 article titled "A low-cost, fully professional ASCII Keyboard and Encoder you can build". Like the TVT, this was picked up by SWTP and sold to accompany the TVT. The hex-inverter MC789s are used as output buffers as well as some wired-OR logic.

Believe it or not, Don still has the article online in his tinaja.com site here (http://www.tinaja.com/glib/asciikbd.pdf)Every time I read Lancaster's stuff it takes me right back to my youth; the man was/is a genius at doing complicated things in the simplest and cheapest way and explaining complicated things in the simplest and clearest way; who knows how much many of us learned from his articles and projects. I had his cookbooks and devoured his articles in PE and RE, and even today get a kick out of and even (re-)learn something from perusing old back issues.

falter
April 2nd, 2014, 10:01 PM
Cool! Never seem that keyboard before? Do yoi have the foil patterns in what you have?

MikeS
April 2nd, 2014, 11:11 PM
No, this was in Popular Electronics in a 1974 article titled "A low-cost, fully professional ASCII Keyboard and Encoder you can build". Like the TVT, this was picked up by SWTP and sold to accompany the TVT. The hex-inverter MC789s are used as output buffers as well as some wired-OR logic.

Believe it or not, Don still has the article online in his tinaja.com site here (http://www.tinaja.com/glib/asciikbd.pdf)It's also one of the circuits in his TV Typewriter Cookbook. Also on Holley's site:
http://www.swtpc.com/mholley/PopularElectronics/Apr1974/PE_Apr1974.htm

MikeS
April 2nd, 2014, 11:18 PM
Cool! Never seem that keyboard before? Do yoi have the foil patterns in what you have?I thought you were going with a 2513?

I'm pretty sure I've got one of those keyboards with blue and red round keys but haven't managed to find it. What are you using for the key switches? Are you building them from scratch as in the RE article?

falter
April 3rd, 2014, 06:53 AM
What I am doing is acquiring parts to create something similar, at least in look, to the prototype's keyboard. If I understood Don correctly in his email to me.. the one used on the prototype was a complete IBM keypunch keyboard reconfigured for that use. No mention though of model number. He did say it used EDBDIC encoding. I'm keeping my eye open on the off chance one comes up on ebay or something (don't know what to look for of course so i just search through all vintage keyboardds there from time to time.)

The closest I've seen online is this:

falter
April 3rd, 2014, 06:55 AM
http://vintchip.com/MAINFRAME/HELP/KEYPUNCH/KEYPUNCH-1.jpg

That looks pretty close but no idea what actual model that is. But yeah.. if I have to.. I'll use whatever RE articles are available and construct a basic keyboard that externally will look like the prototype.

MikeS
April 3rd, 2014, 08:59 AM
http://vintchip.com/MAINFRAME/HELP/KEYPUNCH/KEYPUNCH-1.jpg

That looks pretty close but no idea what actual model that is. But yeah.. if I have to.. I'll use whatever RE articles are available and construct a basic keyboard that externally will look like the prototype.It sure looks familiar...
Didn't we have this discussion in another thread? It also seems familiar...
Speaking of vague recollections, AFAIR IBM generally just used gray and blue keytops; that still looks like an MDS data entry keyboard.

Aside from the keytops, just what kind of keyboard are you looking for? I take it you're not going to build one from scratch as per the RE article?

Chuck(G)
April 3rd, 2014, 09:36 AM
The 024/026 keys were round,and they were black and grey, but the punched output was BCD (i.e. 6 bit code), not EBCDIC. The 029 keytops were rectangular, blue and grey and the output was EBCDIC. I used an RCA Spectra 70 keyboard on my TVT for awhile; the active devices were Fairchild DTL and a lot of diodes. Output was EBCDIC.

I vividly recall multipunching EBCDIC codes on an 026. Letters and numbers and simple punctuation were the same punches.

I had a short encounter with Univac keypunches around 1974 or so. They keys were round, but ivory and grey, IIRC. It was a bizarre system--you keyed in your entire card, which was punched when you hit "Feed" or some such key. No "chunka-chunka" as you typed.

I don't believe that any keypunch keyboard output was either BCD or EBCDIC. A trip to bitsavers would probably verify that. Could it be that Don's keyboard perhaps belonged to some other equipment?

MikeS
April 3rd, 2014, 09:54 AM
I had a short encounter with Univac keypunches around 1974 or so. They keys were round, but ivory and grey, IIRC. It was a bizarre system--you keyed in your entire card, which was punched when you hit "Feed" or some such key. No "chunka-chunka" as you typed.That was the big selling point for MDS and other 'electronic' keypunches, that you could correct your mistakes before punching; disconcerting though, if you were used to the electromechanical ones...


Could it be that Don's keyboard perhaps belonged to some other equipment?Like I said, my money's on Mohawk (MDS); those red and white keys don't look (Big) Blue at all. Wish I could find the one I'm thinking of, but all I could find was a later model with 'normal' keytops that I used in a homebrew Morse code keyboard (they've been rearranged and relabelled, but notice the red, white and blue keytops):

18114

(And the Feb/73 RE in the background ;-) )

Chuck(G)
April 3rd, 2014, 10:50 AM
Well, the big image is definitely a MDS 1101/NCR 735 key-to-tape keyboard. Probably one of the most unfriendly-to-touch-typists keyboard ever made. It would have certainly been surplus gear by 1972 for Don.

MikeS
April 3rd, 2014, 11:11 AM
Well, the big image is definitely a MDS 1101/NCR 735 key-to-tape keyboard.Yeah, and I think it was the earlier models of MDS keypunches and key-tape units that used the round coloured unlabelled keytops that the OP is looking for, in more or less the same colour scheme; just like typewriters almost everybody (except Teletype ;-)) went from round cylindrical keytops to the contoured ones we're used to today around the same time.

falter
April 3rd, 2014, 11:20 AM
This is a quote from the email Don sent me:

"The blue keyboards were rebuilds from IBM EBCDIC keypunch versions bought surplus. There were about 60 of them that rebuilt into 46 or so tvt keyboards."

So rebuild I suppose could mean repainting the keys and surrounds, etc, or reconfiguring. I've no idea -- I was born two years after the TVT article came out. The computers I knew growing up had regular keys. But I figure I can hybrid this if I can't find exactly what Don used -- with the keytops I purchased, repainting them the appropriate colors, recreating the black surrounds (figuring out the font for the key lettering might be tricky), etc. And then the guts underneath could be something created from other RE articles or something of close enough vintage to be reworked the way a hobbyist would have back in the day. Key for me in this project is to replicate, as closely as possible, the exterior appearance of the prototype TVT unit, and get the 'motherboards' as close to correct as possible. The actual internal keyboard workings are less important, though it'd sure be nice to find whatever Don used out there and make it that much more exact.

The site for the museum that hosts the original prototype has some great close up photos and dimensions, but no pictures of the interior. That'd be really handy right now.

MikeS
April 3rd, 2014, 11:27 AM
I'm certainly not going to argue with Don Lancaster! ;-)

Doesn't really matter though what you use, inside or out, as long as it looks right. Have you actually got any keyboard at all yet?

Chuck(G)
April 3rd, 2014, 12:18 PM
Well, if Don says they were EBCDIC and IBM, that would mean (given the time frame) and 029 keypunch. (earlier IBM keypunches weren't EBCDIC).

So I remain puzzled.

falter
April 3rd, 2014, 01:31 PM
No I havent gotten as far as a keyboard yet. Right now collecting ICs. I am having real difficulty on transformers and caps. I want to build it pretty much to original spec.. but I am completely lost, help abpve notwithstanding, on what I need. And where to get it. All that has to take place before I get anywhere on keyboards. But I figure if I know what to look for.. I might get lucky in between then and now and score something like what Don used. I just had no idea what I was looking for. Sounds like it's a bit mysterious. :)

Chuck(G)
April 3rd, 2014, 02:20 PM
My guess is that Don isn't familiar with the old "external BCD" 024-026 card code and thinks that it was EBCDIC. The two resemble each other for many of the keys example (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/026.html)

The 029 card codes are EBCDIC and very close to the old BCD/BCDIC, but they keyboard doesn't look anything like what you're looking at here (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/029.html). Both feature a gap (in IBM gear) between I and J and R and S filled with special characters that distinguishes them from ASCII. However, various vendors translated them to their own internal representations (which is why I said "IBM").

It could be that the similarity would have mislead Don. Neither code is ASCII.

There were bound to be surpluses in 024/026 punches, because after the S/360, IBM no loner used them. A lot were sold to and refurbished by MAI and re-leased to customers with either older equipment or other vendors' gear. CDC, for example, hung onto the old BCD card code right into the 1980s. I suspect the 029s were still in use in the early 1990s.

To be sure, there were other much earlier IBM card punches, but none that would correspond to what you're describing. For example, here's an 031 duplicating card punch (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/ibm031/).

falter
April 3rd, 2014, 04:11 PM
My guess is that Don isn't familiar with the old "external BCD" 024-026 card code and thinks that it was EBCDIC. The two resemble each other for many of the keys example (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/026.html)

The 029 card codes are EBCDIC and very close to the old BCD/BCDIC, but they keyboard doesn't look anything like what you're looking at here (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/029.html). Both feature a gap (in IBM gear) between I and J and R and S filled with special characters that distinguishes them from ASCII. However, various vendors translated them to their own internal representations (which is why I said "IBM").

It could be that the similarity would have mislead Don. Neither code is ASCII.

There were bound to be surpluses in 024/026 punches, because after the S/360, IBM no loner used them. A lot were sold to and refurbished by MAI and re-leased to customers with either older equipment or other vendors' gear. CDC, for example, hung onto the old BCD card code right into the 1980s. I suspect the 029s were still in use in the early 1990s.

To be sure, there were other much earlier IBM card punches, but none that would correspond to what you're describing. For example, here's an 031 duplicating card punch (http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/ibm031/).

I'm thinking 40 years probably dims memories a bit. That first keyboard you posted sure seems fairly close. I'm assuming the odds of my finding one of those for sale somewhere, even Ebay, would be pretty dim, and very expensive?

Chuck(G)
April 3rd, 2014, 04:25 PM
Well, I don't know. At one time, they were very plentiful on the surplus market, as 026s and 024s were being scrapped in huge numbers. IBM realized that if they offered the 029 in BCDIC as well as EBCDIC, they could scrap the old gear altogether--which they did.

I suspect that there are some 026s still sitting in someone's barn or garage. You never know. As I mentioned, my keyboard at the time as a George Risk-manufactured one for the RCA Spectra 70. Try to find a Spectrola today... :)

falter
April 18th, 2014, 01:15 PM
I guess finding a keyboard by itself would be pretty tough. And even if I could, it might be *very* expensive. Look what they want for the complete unit:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/RARE-VINTAGE-IBM-26-INTERPRETING-CARD-PUNCH-WITH-FREE-SHIPPING-/151253703957?pt=US_Vintage_Computers_Mainframes&hash=item23376c5d15

I'd kind of feel bad tearing one of those keyboards apart even if I did find it separate. I guess I'll just have to go for 'close enough'.

What I'd really like to get my hands on is the case design though. I really want to get close to the prototype look.

Chuck(G)
April 18th, 2014, 02:01 PM
I suspect that there's some more detailed stuff on the 026 on bitsavers that might be sufficient. The problem with the 026 keyboard unit is that it's partially mechanical--there's a keyboard lockout solenoid for instance and a novel double-key exclusion mechanism that uses ball bearings (make a row of the things, with just enough slop in it to admit a single key lever).

Al Kossow
April 18th, 2014, 02:51 PM
http://vintchip.com/MAINFRAME/HELP/KEYPUNCH/KEYPUNCH-1.jpg

That looks pretty close but no idea what actual model that is. But yeah.. if I have to.. I'll use whatever RE articles are available and construct a basic keyboard that externally will look like the prototype.


http://computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/X689.86

Al Kossow
April 18th, 2014, 02:55 PM
http://computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/X689.86

It is a Mohawk keyboard, just look at the brochures under http://bitsavers.org/pdf/mohawk

Chuck(G)
April 18th, 2014, 03:39 PM
...but that's not a keypunch as Don relates.

MikeS
April 18th, 2014, 09:39 PM
...but that's not a keypunch as Don relates.Yes, I think we established that it's an MDS keyboard a while back; I believe in their early days MDS did make keypunches (key-to-card) that used a similar keyboard (and they did have EBCDIC versions: I still have several MDS EBCDIC encoder cards using diode matrices). The key-to-tape units used core storage BTW.

Anyway, Brad's been going on so long about these silly keytops that I dug around some more; look what I found:

18333

As I'd said, I used to build and sell a custom QC terminal that had to work 24/7 in a very hostile environment; these keyboards use sealed magnet/reed switches made by MicroSwitch IIRC, so I picked up a bunch of them at the time. Looks like this is all that's left, alas.

cobracon
April 18th, 2014, 10:12 PM
I'm not sure if the OP is interested or if this is the right part, but i have tvt 6-5/8 band new in the bag with all the parts. Not sure what its worth but am willing to let it go.

Chuck(G)
April 19th, 2014, 09:40 AM
Yes, I think we established that it's an MDS keyboard a while back; I believe in their early days MDS did make keypunches (key-to-card) that used a similar keyboard (and they did have EBCDIC versions: I still have several MDS EBCDIC encoder cards using diode matrices). The key-to-tape units used core storage BTW.

I'd be happier about the ID if Don, when presented by your photo, said "Yes!, That's the critter."

MikeS
April 20th, 2014, 09:21 AM
I'd be happier about the ID if Don, when presented by your photo, said "Yes!, That's the critter."Well, I don't think it is the exact critter since the colours don't match (unless Don combined keytops from several units), but MDS are the only keyboards I know of that used round unlabelled keytops in those colours so I suspect that his was from an MDS keypunch whereas mine are from key-tape units.

One thing that is different though is the keyboard labels. On keyboards like mine they are on a single plate with holes for the keys, which snaps on to the kb frame; another way (which might in fact not have been MDS) was a labelled plastic surround on each key, which is what Don's looks like.

I guess the CHM wouldn't be happy about opening theirs up...;-)

falter
May 4th, 2014, 10:58 PM
I'm not sure if the OP is interested or if this is the right part, but i have tvt 6-5/8 band new in the bag with all the parts. Not sure what its worth but am willing to let it go.

I've been away for a bit.. am curious what the 6 5/8 is exactly? I gather a terminal? I've no clue what those would be worth.. never seen one. Can't even find a picture.

cobracon
May 6th, 2014, 08:06 PM
I've been away for a bit.. am curious what the 6 5/8 is exactly? I gather a terminal? I've no clue what those would be worth.. never seen one. Can't even find a picture.

I believe its the main board for the tv typewriter. The paper work says is a Don Lancaster board and comes with 2 different eproms. Has alot of parts with it. I'll try to take some pics later.

cobracon
May 6th, 2014, 08:11 PM
Sorry for the double post. This is what wikipedia says about the board:

TV Typewriter Cookbook[edit]


Don Lancaster's TV Typewriter Cookbook
By 1975 Don Lancaster had authored over 100 articles in magazines such as Popular Electronics and Radio-Electronics. He had also written a digital design book titled the RTL Cookbook in 1968. Resistor-transistor logic (RTL) was an early IC technology that was replaced by TTL, so in 1974 he published the TTL Cookbook. This book was in print for 20 years and sold a million copies.

The original TV Typewriter was designed before low cost RAM was available and the design was soon obsolete. Don had made many design improvements and published them as the TV Typewriter Cookbook in 1976. Portions had been serialized in the first issues of Byte magazine. The book was a guide on how to design a video computer terminal.

Some Basics
Integrated Circuits for TVT use
Memory
System Timing - Calculation and Circuits
Cursor and Update Circuits
Keyboards and Encoders
Serial Interfaces
Television Interfaces
Hard Copy and Color Graphics
This book guided many hobbyist and professionals in designing video displays for home computer systems. The cassette interface design from chapter 7 was the basis for the Kansas City standard. The circuits in this book did not rely on a microprocessor, just TTL. The TV Cheap Video Cookbook (1978) showed the TVT 6 5/8 that would work with a 6502 or 6800 microprocessor. The design was targeted at the KIM-1 Microcomputer.

The original TV Typewriter book cover shows an ASCII keyboard designed by Don Lancaster and sold by Southwest Technical Products. An early computer store chain, the Byte Shop, had the publisher add their logo to the covers and sold the TTL Cookbook and the TV Typewriter Cookbook in their stores. A later edition cover was designed for Radio Shack stores. The ninth printing of the first edition was in 1983.

Chuck(G)
May 6th, 2014, 08:42 PM
I believe that I mentioned that the keyboard shown in the article was the one I used--I still have the manual--that would be around 1975. But Frank says that's not the one the Don used, which is what's leaving us guessing.

falter
May 8th, 2014, 06:33 AM
Cool!

Be interesting to see some pictures of it. Let me know if you come up with a price. It sounds like just a more advanced, refined TVT.

BOB W4MPQ
May 11th, 2014, 04:41 PM
I think I built this TV Typewriter back in the 70's. I may still have it. I made the boards at work from the magazine drawings.
It worked! I'll see if I still have it.
I don't remember what keyboard I used as I had several.
Bob

cobracon
May 13th, 2014, 05:48 PM
Here is the pics of the card I have: http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/album.php?albumid=231