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Oscar
February 10th, 2014, 03:54 AM
Hi,

It is a bit off-topic as regards to Vintage Computing, but for the homebrewers among us this is, I think, a pretty spectacular development: using a plotter with conductive-ink pen to homebrew PCBs.

See here (link) (http://www.heise.de/hardware-hacks/meldung/Paperduino-Gedruckter-Arduino-auf-Papier-2106948.html) - the video at 3:20 shows the idea in practice.

May not be perfect, but I can't wait to build a basic CP/M machine this way...

Regards,

Oscar.

Chuck(G)
February 10th, 2014, 05:03 AM
I posted this (http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?40185-Print-your-own-PCBs-kickstarter) back in November. I wonder what the difference is.

Oscar
February 10th, 2014, 06:53 AM
Chuck,


I posted this (http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?40185-Print-your-own-PCBs-kickstarter) back in November. I wonder what the difference is.

Ah. Well, one difference is that I missed that post...

But this one is simpler I think. It's just a quick-drying conductive-ink pen coming to market. And someone then managed to wedge it in to a normal plotter. Apparently, the pen is good enough to really plot reliable traces.


Regards,

Oscar.

Chuck(G)
February 10th, 2014, 08:51 AM
PCB trace silver repair pens have been around for ages. Here's an example (http://www.chemtronics.com/c-275-circuitworks-conductive-pens-and-inks.aspx). Not the cheapest way to go--and I don't think the Maker product will make double- or multi-sided PCBs very simple. I wonder what the lifetime of the product is--silver is reactive with hydrogen sulfide present in the air (it's what causes your silverware to tarnish).

Stone
February 10th, 2014, 09:08 AM
--silver is reactive with hydrogen sulfide present in the air (it's what causes your silverware to tarnish).It and the Oxygen that is also in the air! :-)

Chuck(G)
February 10th, 2014, 11:16 AM
Yes, but not so much the oxygen as the sulfur in the air. Silver sulfide is what Jeeves spends his time polishing off. Compare silverware or other silverplate when stored in a cupboard in Moose Jaw to one stored in a similar cupboard Galveston (or in a house where a lot of beans is consumed). The Galveston-stored silver tarnishes much, much faster.

Silver sulfide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_sulfide)

Stone
February 10th, 2014, 01:09 PM
The Oxygen is a partner with the hydrogen sulfide (http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver(I)_sulfide)

Chuck(G)
February 10th, 2014, 08:21 PM
Sort of--but what you see is mostly silver sulfide. Drop an egg yolk on some clean sliver and watch the reaction with the sulfur.

Stone
February 11th, 2014, 03:19 AM
Yes, of course, but without the Oxygen there can be no reaction to form the silver sulfide. :-) Oxygen is an integral part of this reaction. Chemistry is not usually WYSIWYG!

Chuck(G)
February 11th, 2014, 08:30 AM
Well sure--but it's the sulfide that gets left behind, not the oxide. Maybe I wasn't speaking clearly--and I apologize if that's the case.