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bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 02:29 AM
All this talk about old audio hardware reminded me of my mums old valve radio that used to belong to her granny.

Years ago she sent it away to get repaired, and it came back with a label attatched stating that batteries are no longer made for this radio, but if they were then it would probably work. My mums says she remembers two big square batteries, one a bit smaller than the other.

There is a label inside the radio showing the outputs for the batteries.

They are as follows:

(first battery)

LT 15 Volts
Ever Ready
AD 35
Vidor L5040
DRYDEX H1 184

(second battery)
HT 90 VOLTS
EVER READY
B126
Vidor L5512
DRYDEX 526


A 90 volt battery??

The radio itself is a wood case with some blue and cream leather sort of stuff covering it, a metal plate and plastic knobs. There is a button in the middlde of the speaker grill that states PYE (Now owned by Phillips, I think) Mum says its at least 60's, and probably not worth much, except for sentimental value. She doesn't mind what I do with it so long as I dont take it to pieces.


Here are some pics:
http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/9834/insidepc8.jpg
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/4163/frontqe8.jpg
http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/2973/batteryac4.jpg
http://img223.imageshack.us/img223/572/colsedcl9.jpg

I would like to get this working again. Bear in mind I know nothing about these sorts of things.
Thanks.

dongfeng
August 28th, 2006, 02:46 AM
I found this a lot of the time, especially with old batteries and bulbs. What you will probably have to do is to make something up out of modern cells.

I've always been given good advice on http://www.vintage-radio.com/ , so it might be worth a try :)

bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 03:13 AM
OK, I have posted on their forum. According to the main site, my radio is a Pye P114BQ dating from 1955 :)
How on earth can I get a 90 volt battery?

Is 90 volts with a a low current dangerous?

bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 07:23 AM
A nice chap has offered to make me some repro batteries that take standard sized cells. He was recommended and so I'm thinking of going down that path. Of course, this radio hasn't been used for so long it may turn out that it doesnt work anyway.

dreddnott
August 28th, 2006, 08:24 AM
DC is less dangerous in general, but there's a lot of potential in 90 volts...

How many milliamps do you suppose it draws?

nige the hippy
August 28th, 2006, 08:38 AM
the batteries can supply quite a high current (an amp or so), so if applied to slightly damp skin, you can get quite a nasty burn (90+Watts available power!). It's just your skin resistance that keeps the current low enough not to kill you. About 50V dc is considered dangerous by legislation (check this!) it'll also make your muscles contract, sometimes stopping you letting go of whatever you touched, so treat a 90 volt battery with utmost respect.

There is also the possibility of making a small mains supply with something like a 15-0-15 transformer a voltage reg for the 15V, and a walton-cockroft voltage multiplier using some quite big caps for the 90V... if the radio still works, cheaper than regularly buying 10, 9V batteries.

bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 08:53 AM
The 15v battery I have been told is a misprint on the part of Pye. 1.5v is more likely. The battery packs on offer; LT takes 2 C batteries, and his HT takes 9 PP3 batteries. The LT needs changing 3 times a year and the HT once.

I dont really want to use a mains power supply. I have kept a strict rule for myself to never mess around with the mains, because I am not experienced working with high voltages and in this case the output is pretty dangerous, nevermind the input.

alexkerhead
August 28th, 2006, 09:44 AM
I dont really want to use a mains power supply. I have kept a strict rule for myself to never mess around with the mains, because I am not experienced working with high voltages and in this case the output is pretty dangerous, nevermind the input.

Well, you could always run a circuit breaker on the mains:cool:

tgunner
August 28th, 2006, 09:52 AM
Well remember, in Europe, the mains are 220 volt. Over here in the US, we mess with 120 all the time, but would any of you touch what powers your clothes dryer, or A/C?

bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 10:11 AM
It used to be 240v in England. I think it's 230 now

USSEnterprise
August 28th, 2006, 10:12 AM
The 15v battery I have been told is a misprint on the part of Pye. 1.5v is more likely. The battery packs on offer; LT takes 2 C batteries, and his HT takes 9 PP3 batteries. The LT needs changing 3 times a year and the HT once.

I dont really want to use a mains power supply. I have kept a strict rule for myself to never mess around with the mains, because I am not experienced working with high voltages and in this case the output is pretty dangerous, nevermind the input.

The 90 volt battery maqy also be a misprint for a 9 volt battery whick is rectangular in shape

dongfeng
August 28th, 2006, 10:28 AM
Here is some info: http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/pye_p114bq.html

90v and 1.5v batteries are correct.

USSEnterprise
August 28th, 2006, 11:03 AM
http://hometown.aol.co.uk/kitradioco/krca2.htm

This is something you can build to actually replace the B126 Battery.

bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 12:07 PM
Thats similar to what this guy (batterymaker1) is offering, except he wants $30 dollars for BOTH batteries and $21 shipping. Thats $51=27. A lot cheaper methinks, but I have to source my own cells. 9 PP3's and 2 B's, which is more than the unit USSEnterprise mentioned, but it doesn't have an inverter so their wont be any RF interference anyhoo.

Here are some pics he sent me of a some units he made for another forum member

http://users.mw.net/%7Ebmorris/exides.jpg
http://users.mw.net/%7Ebmorris/b126harness.jpg
http://users.mw.net/%7Ebmorris/b126loaded.jpg
http://users.mw.net/%7Ebmorris/ad35harness.jpg

My Mum has offered to go on a 50/50 split on the costs of this project :D

bbcmicro
August 28th, 2006, 04:17 PM
I keep reading about whiskers on capacitators....what's this then?

dreddnott
August 28th, 2006, 05:44 PM
220, 230, 240, 250, same difference.

You = dead in any circumstance.

One time, at trueCycle, the electricians accidentally (more like moronically) plugged 240v wires into the upstairs 120v outlets. When I plugged the power strips back in, every computer PSU and AC power adapter that didn't automatically detect the voltage switch exploded violently. Thankfully the actual components were saved by the brave sacrifices of their power supplies.

Another electrician later did the same thing to downstairs boxes over the weekend. I had to replace a lot of Dell power supplies on Monday. All our cameras were fried as well, 48VAC is quite a difference from 24VAC the transformer panel normally provides!.

bbcmicro
August 29th, 2006, 08:50 AM
batterymaker1 says that I'm on his list, and will get round to my order in a couple of weeks. Payment after completion!
Sorted for now.

nige the hippy
August 29th, 2006, 09:08 AM
whiskers on CAPACITORS:- tiny bridges of metal between the two "plates" of the capacitor.
In bigger capacitors you find in the real world (rather than physics lessons) the plates are "toilet rolls" of two pieces of foil seperated by a plastic, or liquid-soaked-wadding, dielectric layer. Bridge often means heat & therefore :shock: BANG!

dano
October 23rd, 2013, 01:43 PM
This is typical for a tube type set. The 1.5V powers the filaments in the tubes while 90V supplies the high voltage needed on the plates. The current draw on the 90V supply is much less than the 1.5V, so you will probably replace the 1.5V battery(s) more frequently. On several radios, I've wired several 9V battery terminals in series, making my own 90V supply. Usually you have to carefully adapt your new battery holders to the radio as the old battery terminals are often no longer available. Connecting them to the wrong place could destroy the tubes or other expensive components, so double and triple check your connection.

Chuck(G)
October 23rd, 2013, 03:23 PM
Offhand, I'd say that the problem had been solved after over 7 years since the original posting.

But 45V alkaline batteries can still be purchased new.

I remember the old 225 and 510 V dry batteries used in old photo strobe units (e.g. Graflex Stroboflash--the big one). Good luck in finding those nowadays...

Dwight Elvey
October 24th, 2013, 02:15 PM
I have such a radio and use a stack of 9V batteries.
If you use alkaline cells they will last for a long time.
You should put a 100 to 150 ohm resistor in series
with the stack ( in the middle is the best place ).
90 can kill you.
If using alkaline cells, you really don't need a full
stack. These radios were made to run on carbon/zinc
cells. They would run fine with only 9 batteries at 81Volts.
The carbon/zinc cells would start dropping on first
load. They'd still be usable at 10% low. Alkalines
have a flatter discharge at a higher voltage level.
A battery clip for the 1.5V D cell would be fine for
the filament power.
Shop around for the 9V cells. you don't have to pay anywhere
near drug store prices. Seem like I bought some Ryovac
ones for about 75 cents each.
Dwight

Chuck(G)
October 24th, 2013, 02:34 PM
Again, Dwight, while interesting, we're responding to a 7 year old post.

mnbvcxz
October 24th, 2013, 02:51 PM
I found this surprising, I would never have thought that this site would have posts about old radios, the OP has long since solved his problem, but this thread may be useful to others who may have an old radio.