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ribbets
August 29th, 2006, 03:30 PM
Found an 8 bit card with a 286 processor on the board with a 40pin cable to a 40 pin male socket plug that has to "8088 socket" written on it. board #JCI-SIS 0986-210107A Rev 1. 5 jumpers Cache and 3 for clock...
the processor has 4/21/86 FC XT286 model 2 on it and PWA120000032 on the side....
NEED INPUT can anyone ID it

BlueofRainbow
August 30th, 2006, 05:41 AM
This maybe an Orchid Tiny Turbo 286 board. Does it has a 80287 socket and/or a switch allowing 8088 vs 80286 operation?

Another possibility is a Sota Technology board - although I'm not sure if they had 286 models. (They had 386 based ones).

TroyW
August 30th, 2006, 06:08 AM
Hmm, interesting, does it have any RAM chips on it, or RAM sockets even (unlikely I know)?

dongfeng
August 30th, 2006, 07:40 AM
The Tiny Turbo board like this: (bottom right card)

http://www.howard81.co.uk/upload/vcf/xt/xt_cards03%20(Medium).JPG

Although mine is missing the cable so I can't use it :(

ribbets
August 30th, 2006, 07:46 AM
286 cpu is center top and their is no toggle switch and the open 40 pin socket is left center ... I believe this came out of an Epson

Chris2005
August 30th, 2006, 12:11 PM
there were many '286 accelerator board things. The Tiny's IINM didn't require unplugging the 8088 - you just plugged the card in a slot and loaded driver software. I have the older card w/an 80186. You'll have to do some research on that. Maybe classiccmp.org.

dongfeng
August 30th, 2006, 12:33 PM
Chris, do you mean the Tiny Turbo 286 board I posted? Total Hardware 99 specifies the cable. If it's not required, any idea where I could get the driver software?

rmay635703
August 30th, 2006, 12:51 PM
I believe you take a HUGE performance hit if you don't have the cable, assuming it works at all, never heard it could run cabless, might be wrong though.

BlueofRainbow
August 30th, 2006, 12:52 PM
Assuming the board came-out of an Epson, some information on 286 accelerator boards tested by Epson for the Equity I+ and Equity II is available from their site.

One of these documents lists the following possibilities for 286 accelerator boards:

Applied Reasoning.....PC Elevator

PC Technologies, Inc.....286 Express

Sota Technology, Inc.....Sota 286i.

There should be some markings on the board it-self that could be decoded to one of the above manufactor/product name combination.

Good luck

Chris2005
September 5th, 2006, 12:58 PM
Chris, do you mean the Tiny Turbo 286 board I posted? Total Hardware 99 specifies the cable. If it's not required, any idea where I could get the driver software?

I may actually have one of the Tiny 286 boards. I have some softwarez for it. Let me check...

ribbets
September 6th, 2006, 04:21 AM
This board was made for EVEREX and it requires the 8088 removed and the cable plugged into the socket.. but thanks for all the help ,,,, I still had the original box and under the foam was the sticker that ID this card

modem7
September 22nd, 2006, 05:35 PM
The POST's A20 test is testing the ability of the AT motherboard to enable/disable the A20 address line.
XT motherboards don't have an A20 address line - they have A0 through A19.
See http://www.pcguide.com/ref/ram/logic_HMA.htm

ribbets
September 26th, 2006, 07:41 AM
The problem was in the boot disk .... and the error was " come from 20" not what I quickly saw as A 20 Line.. Old eyes.. Now I need to find out what the heck intercal for dos is and not use this disk again..

gerrydoire
January 30th, 2009, 10:20 AM
I recently bought a Tiny Turbo Board for my XT.

I haven't done any major tests on it other than seeing if it works.

So far only one card in my XT that doesn't, the floppy card, which was fixed by trying
another floppy card.

Pays to have extras of everything...

Mike Chambers
January 30th, 2009, 08:46 PM
very interesting... i've never even heard of this before. probably would be of similar performance to a tandy 1000tx which has an XT motherboard, as in an 8-bit memory and data bus, but with a 286 chip rigged onto it. it can only access 1 MB of RAM, and the 286's protected mode cannot be used.

even with this limitation, the machine still delivers a huge performance boost over the 8088.

gerrydoire
January 30th, 2009, 09:04 PM
very interesting... i've never even heard of this before. probably would be of similar performance to a tandy 1000tx which has an XT motherboard, as in an 8-bit memory and data bus, but with a 286 chip rigged onto it. it can only access 1 MB of RAM, and the 286's protected mode cannot be used.

even with this limitation, the machine still delivers a huge performance boost over the 8088.

Like a clone xt with a turbo button :+>

The nice thing about the card, it doesnt alter the computer in any,
other than just plugging in the card.

If it required changing chips and soldering in anything, I wouldn't of bothered.

Another card that is very rare, the intel board, inboard 386, that would be a nice gem to get a hold of..

:D

Mike Chambers
January 30th, 2009, 09:21 PM
Like a clone xt with a turbo button :+>

The nice thing about the card, it doesnt alter the computer in any,
other than just plugging in the card.

If it required changing chips and soldering in anything, I wouldn't of bothered.

Another card that is very rare, the intel board, inboard 386, that would be a nice gem to get a hold of..

:D

never heard of the inboard 386 either. the 286 upgrade card and tandy 1000tx is more than just a mega-turbo 8088... you also get the ability to run programs that use 286 instructions!

gerrydoire
January 30th, 2009, 09:57 PM
The Tiny Turbo board like this: (bottom right card)

http://www.howard81.co.uk/upload/vcf/xt/xt_cards03%20(Medium).JPG

Although mine is missing the cable so I can't use it :(

Identical to what I have, with some patience you could probably make your own cable.

gerrydoire
January 30th, 2009, 10:01 PM
never heard of the inboard 386 either. the 286 upgrade card and tandy 1000tx is more than just a mega-turbo 8088... you also get the ability to run programs that use 286 instructions!

http://ummr.altervista.org/images/9806_3.jpg