PDA

View Full Version : Anybody using IPv6 here?



Ole Juul
June 13th, 2014, 11:23 PM
The other day I got a VPS that was IPv6 only, unless I wanted to fiddle around and configure it with a reverse proxy. I decided to just stay with IPv6 since this was all just about a learning experience anyway. Before this I couldn't browse or connect in any way with v6 but a little fiddling with my router and that's all fine now. I can SSH into my new server with a new very long IP, though I soon figured out the advantage of DNS in the v6 world. :)

Anybody else adopting v6 here? Are you using a tunnel or are you using 6to4?

barythrin
June 16th, 2014, 08:16 AM
VPS = Virtual Private Server? (acronym isn't coming to mind). I'm not doing anything IPv6 personally. Not really any reason to internally unless I want more than 16 million vintage systems on the network at a time it won't be an issue. Externally I think most vendors are doing IPv6 for internet facing routing but I rarely look at that interface and don't really follow the news on how far the transition has gone. I thought there was some requirement dates though that they wanted vendors to be using things by just to get the push. I don't know if they ever convinced certain companies to not own a class A IP range anymore though. I recall a list of a few like Ford and some others that for whatever reason owned a class A (as if they'd have 16 million systems on the public internet).

I did run into an issue at work where our desktop firewall product had a rule to block IPv6 enabled but something also changed our desktops to ping localhost as IPv6 and potentially some other traffic. That broke some locally installed services for folks so I had to change that rule which was interesting.

Ole Juul
June 16th, 2014, 10:16 AM
VPS = Virtual Private Server? (acronym isn't coming to mind).

Yes, Virtual Private Server. I'm just trying to stay young and in the loop. :) They're pretty popular these days, partly because of the possibilities of a good price. If you just want to serve a few pages, set up a proxy in another country, and things like that, then it's a good way to go. As low as $3.95 per year will let you install your own OS, and configure to your heart's content. Check out Lowenbox (http://lowendbox.com/). Here is a listing by price (http://lowendstock.com/). Then head over to Freenom (http://freenom.com) and get a free domain name (.tk .ml .cf .ga) and you're good to serve pages for a year, and you're only out by four bucks. Of course, there's much more expensive ones if you want some real power.



I'm not doing anything IPv6 personally. Not really any reason to internally unless I want more than 16 million vintage systems on the network at a time it won't be an issue.

I'm guessing that IPv6 won't be of interest for vintage computers. I'm not sure what you'd do for some kind of translation. I'm assuming that nobody's got a v6 stack that will integrate with older software. As long as the internet in general is using v4, or ISP's will let it pass, then we're OK here. I NAT everyhing on my internal network so lots of addresses anyway.


Externally I think most vendors are doing IPv6 for internet facing routing but I rarely look at that interface and don't really follow the news on how far the transition has gone. I thought there was some requirement dates though that they wanted vendors to be using things by just to get the push. I don't know if they ever convinced certain companies to not own a class A IP range anymore though. I recall a list of a few like Ford and some others that for whatever reason owned a class A (as if they'd have 16 million systems on the public internet).

I think it's moving along nicely, but only a couple of the big ISPs are making it avilable to users. I've been pinging around (ping6) and not getting much response. I think it's a headache for any smaller ISP because their users may not be ready. There's still lots of routers thata don't support it. Any Linux or UNIX box has done it for a long time, and I read the MS-Windows is just fine as well so if the routers get replaced and the ISPs get up to speed then few consumers would notice.

It's interesting about the IPv4 addresses running out. It seems like there's still lots out there, but they're owned by companies. One of the VPS services I have gives me 2 IPv4 addresses. One woders how they can do that on a $5 a year service. (RIJX (http://rijx.com/pricing.html)) found out how a little company can do that. They lease the numbers from a larger company who has lots of them and who would rather monetise that holding than just sit on it. It's a bit like phone numbers in that regard. Actually, from them I got a more expensive plan ($10!) and the extra memory does give it some more snap, though I can't be sure if that's just the superior LA pipe.


I did run into an issue at work where our desktop firewall product had a rule to block IPv6 enabled but something also changed our desktops to ping localhost as IPv6 and potentially some other traffic. That broke some locally installed services for folks so I had to change that rule which was interesting.

There's a few web sites that are IPv6 only. I haven't found anything that really needed it though. Google is up to speed, as one would expect.

Anyway, I'm just trying to figure out how users, like here, are doing with it. I posted a similar question on several very tehie forums, and got no response.* Are people ignoring IPv6? At this jpoint it's actually not that easy and in fact a bit of a headache if you don't need to do it. If your ISP doesn't offer it via DHCP, or at all, then one has to go to a place like Hurricane Electric to get a tunnel and then figure out how to configure one's router to use that. I'm currently unable to get that working, so am just using 6to4 for now which is less than ideal and won't be good in the future.

* I did get a response in a forum which is dedicated to IPv6 - as would be expected. :)

PhotoJim
June 26th, 2014, 01:12 PM
I run IPv6 at home (dual stacked). I even have some vintage hardware with IPv6 (a 486 running Debian, a SPARCstation 10 and 20 running NetBSD, and a VAXstation running OpenBSD). The old hardware handles IPv6 fine, as long as its operating system does.

The real advantage to me is the lack of NAT. If I want, e.g., ssh ports facing the world I can do it without forwarding ports from my router.

Pepinno
July 19th, 2014, 12:20 PM
Are people ignoring IPv6?

I, for one, am ignoring IPv6. I will worry about it no sooner than when my ISP absolutely forces me to use it.

Ole Juul
July 19th, 2014, 02:27 PM
I, for one, am ignoring IPv6. I will worry about it no sooner than when my ISP absolutely forces me to use it.

I think that's the way most people think about it. I like IPv4 just fine, and there doesn't seem to be any lack of available addresses from my point of view. I got two dedicated IPs with a dirt cheap account, and my own ISP gave me a dedicated IP just for the asking. Even my hosting company gave me a dedicated IP as a freebee. On the lowly end user's level, there's still lots to go around.

That said, I thought I'd just get myself a little ahead of the curve and figure out what I may be in for in the next 10 years (or whenever ISPs get on board with this). My OS, like most, is dual stack and nothing is required there. All I had to do was enable some version of IPv6 in my outward facing router and I can browse the IPv6 side of the net without problem. I put a test page here (http://[2a00:1630:2:f00::fd9a:7f23]) just to fool around.

tingo
July 22nd, 2014, 02:31 AM
I, for one, am ignoring IPv6. I will worry about it no sooner than when my ISP absolutely forces me to use it.

It's not such much that I'm ignoring it, its more like I'm postponing it - I'm not ready to read up and learn the IPv6 way of my toolset yet.

glitch
July 22nd, 2014, 05:58 AM
I'm running dual-stack with a Hurricane Electric tunnel at home. Mostly I connect to machines at my parents' house, since their ISP (HughesNet) provides native IPv6. Most of my day-to-day operations still happen over IPv4 (NFS, SSH, NTP, most HTTP/S). I still haven't 100% figured out how I want to handle address allocation and DNS. Sort of hoping for a return to FQDNs on every machine!