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View Full Version : IBM PC 5150 rev. A on EBAY (not mine)



romanon
July 22nd, 2014, 10:19 PM
Wow, nice piece, i'm curious about the final price.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271553594312?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&fromMakeTrack=true

bobba84
July 22nd, 2014, 10:36 PM
I want it! Too bad shipping to Australia is so high, there's always good stuff for sale in the USA.

Ole Juul
July 22nd, 2014, 10:55 PM
Something seems not right. Perhaps I'm mistaken, but should such an early model have double sided drives? DOS 1.1 came out May '82 and v1.0 only supported single sided. AFAIK the double sided drives were not available until the spring of '82.

Unknown_K
July 22nd, 2014, 11:32 PM
Not the original video card (they had the wide black slot cover).

Cimonvg
July 23rd, 2014, 01:23 AM
hello
talking about rev.A , here is the PSU of what you call it (?) first edition and second edition (first edition on the right) : /cimonvg
19580

k2x4b524[
July 23rd, 2014, 07:59 PM
Doesn't look like the floppy controller is original, and I think the very first ones sold with IBM Branded single sided drives. I have seen only one of those drives in person. Plus, wouldn't the first ones have been monochrome?

bobba84
July 23rd, 2014, 08:45 PM
From what I know, the colour monitor didn't come out until about April 1983. So it's not the original card.

SpidersWeb
July 23rd, 2014, 08:51 PM
The original owner upgraded to a graphics card, and he upgraded it again to CGA. The original MDA card is long gone. The seller did a pretty good write up but you've got to scroll down to see it.
Floppy drives have definitely been upgraded to DS units - controller appears original (based on his description and the black back plate).

I'd happily pay a couple of hundred for something like that, but then I'd have to add $400 shipping :(

bonedaddy
July 24th, 2014, 04:21 AM
Actually he said he still has the monochrome adapter (not IBM) and will include it instead of the CGA. He has a reserve on it which I'm certain is more than a couple hundred.

per
July 24th, 2014, 10:11 AM
From what I know, the colour monitor didn't come out until about April 1983. So it's not the original card.
The CGA was available from the start; Allthough IBM didn't make a monitor for it in 1981 the card did produce composite output, and other digital RGB monitors existed at the time (though most of them lacked the intensity input).

SpidersWeb
July 24th, 2014, 01:21 PM
Actually he said he still has the monochrome adapter (not IBM) and will include it instead of the CGA. He has a reserve on it which I'm certain is more than a couple hundred.

Probably, but I wouldn't pay that much.
He has that MDA card, but not the original it likely shipped with.

Shadow Lord
July 25th, 2014, 08:07 AM
Well, it is the 2nd or third time he is listing. It is not hitting his "reserve price"

billdeg
July 25th, 2014, 10:20 AM
it's very normal for people to have purchased a drive after-market down the road after the initial purchase, and the earliest of these systems would often have typically been sold with only one drive.

Chuck(G)
July 25th, 2014, 11:04 AM
it's very normal for people to have purchased a drive after-market down the road after the initial purchase, and the earliest of these systems would often have typically been sold with only one drive.

...and a single-sided drive at that. Mine was.

orion24
July 25th, 2014, 12:36 PM
I want it! Too bad shipping to Australia is so high, there's always good stuff for sale in the USA.

Yeah, same for shipping to Greece. I've been looking for machines like that on eBay for a long time now and they seem to be fairly abundant in USA but hard to find elsewhere. When an auction in EU pops up, it ends a lot more expensive than a similar in US. And shipping costs and import taxes make a direct purchase from USA out of the question. Looks like they were dominating the original IBM PC sales for some reason.

Stone
July 25th, 2014, 01:31 PM
Maybe that's because the early machines were 110V and made in the USA. :-)

simplex
July 25th, 2014, 01:54 PM
What's the appeal of this version compared to later revs of 5150? I get that it was the first and all, but isn't it basically the same?

SomeGuy
July 25th, 2014, 03:30 PM
There are a number of differences between the IBM 5150 "A version" and "B version". Some of them are shown here: http://www.minuszerodegrees.net/5150/early/5150_early.htm

Personally, I think the most interesting difference in the earlier version is the motherboard, that can hold a minimum of just 16k ram and a whopping maximum of 64k. It is interesting to realize that the PCs we all use today evolved from directly from this machine that could technically have been used with only 16k RAM, ROM basic, and a cassette tape.

Of course, there were also fewer of them so they are more rare.

Also, really early versions or prototypes of any machine can sometimes reveal subtle bits of history such as early production problems, or last minute design changes.

Ole Juul
July 25th, 2014, 05:48 PM
What's the appeal of this version compared to later revs of 5150? I get that it was the first and all, but isn't it basically the same?
To me it is the elegance of using minimal resources to compute. These machines are nicer with single sided drives and even nicer with just one than with two. The earlier board is also very pretty just in itself. This is the sort of thing that distinguishes this phase in PC development from the next one with two 360K drives and 640K of memory - ie. the XT, which was a real powerhouse.

When you start upgrading a lot, like the box under discussion here, it loses its appeal and is actually worth less from a historical perspective. Of course, a mish mash like he is trying to sell also represents a certain historical reality, so there certainly are different ways of looking at it.

Unknown_K
July 26th, 2014, 02:01 AM
Depends on the upgrade. I kind of like my 5150 with dual drives, all original cards, and a Monte Carlo RAM/serial card (with the same wide black slot cover). It has a 64K RAM card from IBM as well. Once you start using newer floppies and cards meant for XT machines it loses its appeal. I did stick in a newer IBM CGA card to test it since I don't have a monochrome monitor of the correct vintage.

Dave Farquhar
July 26th, 2014, 06:41 AM
These were expensive machines and bought to be used and expanded, so really pristine ones would be unusual and difficult to find. Even finding one in upgraded state, the way it was used for most of its life, is interesting though.