PDA

View Full Version : eBay screws over sellers again



vwestlife
August 13th, 2014, 06:59 AM
If you thought sellers no longer being able to leave negative feedback on buyers was bad, hold on, it's going to get worse... as of next year, eBay will be forcing all sellers who offer returns to pay for the return shipping. It's their "Hassle-Free Returns" system, which means if a buyer wants to return an item, eBay will automatically generate a return shipping label for them and charge the seller the return shipping cost.

Sellers can still opt to not offer returns, but that will become nearly meaningless, because another change is that in "Item Not As Described" (NAD) cases, the seller will have to pay the return shipping cost as well. And within 6 days of the item being returned to you, eBay will automatically give the buyer a refund, unless you file a dispute against their NAD claim. And anybody who's ever dealt with that can tell you that eBay has a very wide berth of what counts as "not as described", so the chances of your dispute being successful are slim. (And that's not even counting the cases where the buyer breaks the item by their own fault, and then returns it to you, claiming that it was already broken when they got it...)

On the eBay Community forums, many people aren't happy about this, and say that if they're going to continue selling on eBay, they will be forced to raise their prices by the amount of what return shipping would cost them.

Also, eBay will be giving buyers the option to cancel their bid up to an hour after the auction ends. People predict that this will lead to buyers bidding on multiple listings of an item that end around the same time, and then only pay for the one that ended up being the lowest price, and cancelling all the rest.

The eBay Community thread of sellers complaining about the changes:
http://community.ebay.com/t5/Selling/Sellers-will-be-responsible-for-return-shipping-on-SNAD-cases/td-p/22396282

NeXT
August 13th, 2014, 07:25 AM
I got no problem with that considering some of the times I bought something from China I ended up getting burned because it might be pennies for them but I gotta pay $20 to send it back.
For everyone else, you better quit wasting your time with fancy looking listings and just describe the damn thing, along with taking proper photographs and packing it well. You know, the stuff you should be doing anyways.


On the eBay Community forums, many people aren't happy about this, and say that if they're going to continue selling on eBay, they will be forced to raise their prices by the amount of what return shipping would cost them.
These people are scum anyways.

I didn't properly describe my listing and my iphone photo didn't show case damage and now I have to pay to have my poorly described item returned! http://fi.somethingawful.com/safs/smilies/0/4/reddit.001.gif

Oh, shut up.

glitch
August 13th, 2014, 07:31 AM
Not saying all buyers do it, but I've had a few high-end items returned on the "Item Not as Described" BS. That's why I no longer have an eBay store. Still worth the risk with things where the profits on eBay will be *much* higher than elsewhere, but not worth it for items with slimmer margins.

Cancelling a bid up to an hour after the auction ends doesn't make a whole lot of sense. I guess it will reduce the number of "NAD" cases due to buyer's remorse...

akator
August 13th, 2014, 08:03 AM
I don't have much pity for eBay sellers. I have received too many things not as described, poorly packed and damaged during shipment, or even not the same item shown in the photos.

As an occasional selle,r people have tried to scam me as well. Easy solution is to document everything with photos. Tested, working, serial numbers, details, packing, even the address of the buyer on the outside of the box. It's amazing how many scammers will disappear the moment photographic evidence is presented. In case of actual damage during shipment, the photos are also instrumental in a positive outcome for a shipping insurance claim.

Photos, photos, photos. With so many options for taking digital photos, there's really no excuse not to take them. It's not like we have to pay to get them developed anymore :D

vwestlife
August 13th, 2014, 09:12 AM
I got no problem with that considering some of the times I bought something from China I ended up getting burned because it might be pennies for them but I gotta pay $20 to send it back.

I forgot to mention... the new mandatory "Hassle-Free Returns" only apply to U.S. sellers... so Chinese sellers can continue selling shoddy counterfeit junk.

Another change is that participation in the "Global Shipping Program" will become mandatory as well, so you will no longer be able to list items as "U.S. bidders only". All items will be open to international bidders. If a foreign buyer wins the item, you'll only pay for U.S. postage to the Pitney Bowes shipping center in Kentucky, where PB will then take care of the customs forms and forward it to its destination. However, PB reserves the right to open up and repackage items, and not necessarily with the same amount of packing material as you originally included to protect the item from damage.

Luckily I haven't had any problems with this in the few times I've used the GSP, but there have been cases were PB repackaged the item and then it got damaged, and eBay does not protect the seller from getting negative feedback if that happens, even though PB is supposed to take the blame and cover the cost if the item gets damaged after it leaves their shipping center.

JDallas
August 13th, 2014, 09:32 AM
Not saying all buyers do it, but I've had a few high-end items returned on the "Item Not as Described" BS...
You might want to check that the returned item has everything you sent originally. eBay's easy return policy could allow unscrupulous buyers to trade bad integrated circuits for good ones on socketed boards they buy then return. If an electrical appliance goes bad, buy one on eBay and return the bad one. Buyers should be aware of this potential and check serial numbers and wax-mark ICs that might be swapped.

Hmm, as an illuminating example: you could never have to pay for light bulbs again if you were an unscrupulous eBay buyer that bought good bulbs online and had the seller pay for shipping back your burned out bulbs.

All things being equal, I'd rather sell new products via Amazon.com... eBay is getting a rather black-market reputation for stolen goods. I did a biz-consult years ago and among other idiocies, found several of the company's manufacturing employees selling the company's product discounted on eBay with no record of purchasing the original.

To make matters worse they were sold as, "Still under manufacturer's warranty" and no serial numbers were used so nothing could be validated. Products that were rejected by quality control, had been sold on eBay and were returned for replacement due to the same quality reason that got it rejected; company had to buy raw materials and labor for two units: the rejected one assumed destroyed and the one they had to replace! The company didn't make a dime on either of those.

Cameras secretly installed showed employees walking out with product to their trucks. Thereafter the company started permanently marking production rejects so that they could be identified and closed the employee store. The company still doesn't use serial numbers due to the nature of the product materials used. :S


It looks like eBay is making their sellers take the pain for eBay's plans to increase membership and revenue. If you have to raise your prices to maintain the status quo, eBay is still taking the additional profit. This will work in the short-term. Eventually they'll reach the revolt threshold.

SomeGuy
August 13th, 2014, 09:44 AM
Stating the obvious here, but shipping fees are already high enough. A $10 item can easily cost $20 or $30 after shipping and whatever a seller has added on for eBay fees.

This is all just asking for more vintage stuff ending up in the chipper shredder.

Al Kossow
August 13th, 2014, 09:44 AM
giving buyers the option to cancel their bid up to an hour after the auction ends.

Another brick in the wall.
eBay needs a serious competitor.

I remember when they had real auctions (not a sea of BINs) with information-dense listings.
Listings now are click bait.
No, I REALLY DO NOT WANT YOUR SUGGESTIONS FOR OTHER THINGS TO LOOK AT, eBay
Sadly, addblock thinks this is 'content'. meh..
I'm not going to create lists of things I'm interested in, nor am I interested in what others think are related.
I also don't look at them on a smartphone and find wasting 2/3 of my horizontal screen real estate annoying.

mbbrutman
August 13th, 2014, 09:51 AM
Did you guys all forget about our own VC Forum market?

http://marketplace.vintage-computer.com/

The market exposure for items posted there is far lower than on eBay. So if you are looking to make a hefty profit, it is not for you. But if you want to get your excess vintage computing items to a like minded collector, this is the way to do it.

No fees. No BS. Courtesy of Erik.

glitch
August 13th, 2014, 10:19 AM
Did you guys all forget about our own VC Forum market?

http://marketplace.vintage-computer.com/

The market exposure for items posted there is far lower than on eBay. So if you are looking to make a hefty profit, it is not for you. But if you want to get your excess vintage computing items to a like minded collector, this is the way to do it.

No fees. No BS. Courtesy of Erik.

Yes, DO USE THE MARKETPLACE! I personally have gotten some outstanding deals here. I haven't sold anything yet, but so far I haven't had any problems as a buyer.

glitch
August 13th, 2014, 10:20 AM
You might want to check that the returned item has everything you sent originally. eBay's easy return policy could allow unscrupulous buyers to trade bad integrated circuits for good ones on socketed boards they buy then return. If an electrical appliance goes bad, buy one on eBay and return the bad one. Buyers should be aware of this potential and check serial numbers and wax-mark ICs that might be swapped.

I've only had one case of this as a seller, and couldn't prove it to eBay's liking. Someone swapped worn-out tubes for the NOS ones in a piece of audio gear and returned it.

Stone
August 13th, 2014, 10:33 AM
I remember when they had real auctions...EBay never had real auctions. Their method of bidding bears zero resemblance to any auction on earth! It's more like a guessing game for pussies. :-) If it were a real auction it might actually be interesting.

vwestlife
August 13th, 2014, 01:12 PM
EBay never had real auctions. Their method of bidding bears zero resemblance to any auction on earth! It's more like a guessing game for pussies. :-) If it were a real auction it might actually be interesting.

Years ago, you could see the full user names of other bidders and be able to send messages to them. Users' feedback records had links to all the items they bought and sold and showed the buyers/sellers of each. And if a seller accepted a "best offer", that sale price was shown on the listing. Now, public access to all of that information is gone, which reduces the openness of the marketplace and the ability to accurately judge the fair-market value of an item.

Dwight Elvey
August 13th, 2014, 01:32 PM
From the buyer side.
Shill bidding is still being done. Allowing buyers to
back out easier just increases that.
There is no way to mark an item as:
"Won't buy, at any price. Don't show it to me again on search"
Without that ability, I just don't have the time to scan listings
any more.
Dwight

vwestlife
August 14th, 2014, 09:55 AM
Note that seller-paid return shipping in "Item Not As Described" cases takes effect September 15th this year. Mandatory seller-paid return shipping in all cases (even buyer's remorse) on listings allowing returns won't take effect until "Holiday season 2015", so until then, sellers can still opt to make buyers pay for return shipping. But guess what... all the buyer has to do is hit the item with a hammer, then claim it's "Not As Described" and presto, they get free return shipping!

eBay says they need to make these changes to "better compete with other eCommerce providers" (i.e. Amazon). But some are calling for the Antique and Vintage categories to be opted out of the changes, because Amazon doesn't compete in that field and brick-and-morter antique stores are virtually all NO RETURNS ACCEPTED.

Chuck(G)
August 14th, 2014, 10:36 AM
On an eBay topic, I got to wondering about those outrageous prices for old gear that you see on eBay--you know, the $400 floppy drive...

Do some eBay sellers use price-setting software for their offerings? By that I mean software that searches out competitor's prices and then sets the price either higher or lower. There was a publicized case of this involving two book sellers on Amazon that resulted in a price of somewhere around $23 million for a not-terribly uncommon 60-page booklet.

I'm certain that some web vendors are doing this--taking a competitor's price on an uncommon item and adding a bit to cover their costs (they don't actually have the item, but figure that they can purchase it from the original vendor, then pass it on).

So does this happen on eBay?

TanruNomad
August 14th, 2014, 11:57 AM
One feature I'd like to see removed is the reserve price option. Sellers should just put the starting price as the minimum price they want to sell it for and be done with it.

vwestlife
August 14th, 2014, 12:01 PM
One feature I'd like to see removed is the reserve price option. Sellers should just put the starting price as the minimum price they want to sell it for and be done with it.

I wouldn't be surprised if eBay eventually forces all sellers to post a Buy It Now price on all items. eBay doesn't care about being an "auction" site anymore. They just want to get more buyers and make more money.

JDallas
August 14th, 2014, 12:25 PM
...resulted in a price of somewhere around $23 million for a not-terribly uncommon 60-page booklet...
Its wouldn't be the first time that memorabilia or baseball cards etc were used in illegal money transfers or laundering schemes.

Mobsters can get legitimate looking transfers of money to them by selling a fake baseball card and telling the guy he's extorting, to buy it from him online (or at his Baseball Card shop... pawn shop etc).

Shortly later the baseball card is lost or destroyed so authenticity can never be confirmed. In fact who can say the baseball card ever even existed in a transfer of ownership?

On the other hand... that $400 floppy drive could have been previously owned by Pablo Picasso. ;)

In regard to the future policies of eBay... its easy to see where its going:
All sellers will have to buy their very OWN stuff online and just give eBay a commission.
That will end the gripes of shipping costs and returns.

Unknown_K
August 14th, 2014, 12:34 PM
Costs and warranty issues are keeping people from dumping vintage items on ebay (plus the local demand from scrappers). Quite a bit of common stuff that is being auctioned off goes for higher and higher prices because of ebay fees and issues with some buyers.

The flip side is people will now be joining here just to flip items (lots of scrappers do already) and along with legit sellers we will be seeing scammers as well.

commodorejohn
August 14th, 2014, 12:35 PM
They've been continually making things worse for buyers, too - not only have they revamped the format of their saved-searches emails to waste even more screen space recently, they also appear to have made saved searches no longer stay confined to the category you select - so my search for Prophet keyboards in the musical-instruments section is now turning up Prophet comic books. Ye gods. It's enough to make me wonder why I bother anymore.

Ole Juul
August 15th, 2014, 02:29 AM
No ability for buyers to go back and see what they bought. They remove items from your list if you didn't get them, so you can't go back and complain. (Yes, that's happened to me.) My gripes goes on and on about how buyers are getting screwed.

I don't bother even looking at auctions, and basically just go to Ebay to get cheap Chinese stuff. Only occasionally do I get something from this continent. Things that are used are generally too expensive for me since if it was made two weeks ago it's considered rare because the seller was born yesterday. I don't mind paying a decent buck for something which is tested and sold by someone who knows what it is. But on Ebay, people ask huge prices for something they don't know what is or if it works. I'm sorry, but few things are worth more than a dollar (including shipping) if it's sold on those terms. If I want something vintage I'll ask the nice people here. Then at least there's both good will and expertise.

I'm sure many people agree with me when I say that Ebay has had its day.

Stone
August 15th, 2014, 03:00 AM
No ability for buyers to go back and see what they bought...I dunno, Ole. I can see everything I bought for the last three years, selectable by year. So I can view everything from January, 2012 thru today. Go back and re-check your Purchase history.

vwestlife
August 15th, 2014, 04:23 AM
I dunno, Ole. I can see everything I bought for the last three years, selectable by year. So I can view everything from January, 2012 thru today. Go back and re-check your Purchase history.

Yes, that's the one good thing they've done recently -- previously, older purchased items would drop off the list, with no apparent way to view them. Unfortunately, in exchange for that ability to view older purchases, they've made that page "touch optimized", with oversized fonts, huge brightly colored buttons instead of text links, and excessively large amounts of wasted "white space" around everything, to allow for "fat fingers". The result is that while the page used to be able to display four or five items on the screen at a time, now it only has enough room to display two!

JDallas
August 15th, 2014, 04:40 AM
I can see everything I bought for the last three years, selectable by year. So I can view everything from January, 2012 thru today. Go back and re-check your Purchase history.
I used eBay's past records access a few years ago when I discovered those off-the-book sales during a consult for the company that was unknowingly getting ripped off.

While I discovered that someone had been selling their product for about 15 years on eBay (backstory: it was a friend of one of their senior executives) I used those eBay records with lists of products, pricing and monthly volume to create a good profile of their seasonal sales patterns to re-adjust their production schedule.

Ironic using a crooked eBay seller to help the company he was ripping off. I enjoyed that aspect. :)

While it was tedious to access and compile the records through eBay, they were available at the time and it was great data for marketing and production analysis. The company was too stupid to do with their own sales records. I recall that after so many years back the eBay records only had the monthly sales volume in dollars of the eBay seller and not the itemized sales records.

Anyhow, considering how useful that information was to outsiders, I can understand eBay removing that sort of records access... if not instead making it a for pay service like Linked-In tends to do with anything moderately useful.

vwestlife
August 15th, 2014, 05:42 AM
I used eBay's past records access a few years ago when I discovered those off-the-book sales during a consult for the company that was unknowingly getting ripped off.

While I discovered that someone had been selling their product for about 15 years on eBay

That reminds me, I recently broke my headphones and wanted to get a new pair. Amazon had a better price, but I didn't have $35 worth of stuff to order to get free shipping, and their shipping charge was more costly, so I bought them on eBay to save a few bucks. To my surprise, the headphones arrived in an Amazon.com box, shipped from Amazon as a "gift" sent to me!

I think what happened is that the eBay seller has an Amazon Prime membership which gives him discounts and free shipping on everything, and is taking advantage of that to resell items on eBay at a markup without even needing to have them in his possession -- he just orders them from Amazon as a "gift" sent to the eBay buyer.

Maverick1978
August 15th, 2014, 06:53 AM
I think what happened is that the eBay seller has an Amazon Prime membership which gives him discounts and free shipping on everything, and is taking advantage of that to resell items on eBay at a markup without even needing to have them in his possession -- he just orders them from Amazon as a "gift" sent to the eBay buyer.
Hah! Easy way to turn a few bucks with little effort! Still, I'd be scared to do that, as Amazon is well-known to fluctuate pricing by the individual account (google it if you doubt me)

re: ebay....

I think that they had it perfect about 10 years ago, right after they introduced BIN and reserve pricing. That allowed the "storefronts" to go that route, we still had true auctions, and sellers were protected from bad buyer groups, while buyers were protected from bad seller groups.

.... and then ebay started figuring that buyers were more important than sellers (wrongly, imo - and I'm primarily a buyer). They seem to forget that without people WANTING to sell their items, buyers would have nothing to buy, and revenue stops flowing.

Then again, for the casual mom or dad looking to unload 5-10 items a year, they don't give a crap about ebay fees or how unfair things are. They don't have enough volume to care. The buyers certainly don't care - everything benefits them. The only people that care are those who list things regularly/semi-regularly (alot of you), or the people that would like to but hear the horror stories and just haven't (this would be me)

Stone
August 15th, 2014, 07:52 AM
...we still had true auctions...Once again, eBay's automated bidding scheme, aka, the 'place your maximum bid' BS, is definitely *not*, in any way, shape or form, even remotely related to a true auction!

Trixter
August 15th, 2014, 08:08 AM
Once again, eBay's automated bidding scheme, aka, the 'place your maximum bid' BS, is definitely *not*, in any way, shape or form, even remotely related to a true auction!

Your wording is a bit extreme. In a "true" auction, most (serious, disciplined) bidders decide on an absolute maximum price they'll pay for something and won't go over it, to prevent buyer's remorse. That's identical to ebay.

That being said, I would like to see ebay allow open bidding (ie. bidding doesn't stop at a fixed time, but rather after a fixed time after the last bid). It's a subtle change, but would mean potentially more opportunity (ie. money) for sellers.

Stone
August 15th, 2014, 08:50 AM
In a "true" auction, most (serious, disciplined) bidders decide on an absolute maximum price they'll pay for something and won't go over it, to prevent buyer's remorse. That's identical to ebay.Not even close! In an auction the bidder must announce each higher bid himself. There's none of this automated bidding up to your maximum bid! Deciding on a maximum price (in your head) and having eBay automatically increase your bid up to its pre-selected maximum is like apples and oranges. EBay's so-called auctions are anything but real auctions! If you think the real auction process is identical to eBay's then you aren't thinking. :-)

"If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." -- Gen. George S. Patton Jr.

Trixter
August 15th, 2014, 09:09 AM
Not even close! In an auction the bidder must announce each higher bid himself. There's none of this automated bidding up to your maximum bid

My point was that there was little difference in practice, only in execution. If you want to state your point a little more eloquently, you could say that ebay is identical to a silent auction.

I know that many people who rely on auctions for their livelyhood prefer live auctions, as it gives them more tools -- for example, recognizing competitors' preferences, strengths, and weaknesses; using subtle psychological tricks to influence other bidders' behavior; etc. This is valid, if somewhat distasteful (to me personally). However, this is the same opinion given by floor traders, who are nearly extinct -- if being on the floor gave them the "human advantage", then maybe there would be more floor traders left...

vwestlife
August 15th, 2014, 09:32 AM
There's none of this automated bidding up to your maximum bid! Deciding on a maximum price (in your head) and having eBay automatically increase your bid up to its pre-selected maximum is like apples and oranges.

eBay introduced the automated bidding because people were using "bid-bot" programs to do that for them.

Anyway, eBay is already advertising that "virtually all" items have a money-back guarantee. So in other words, those of us who do "as-is" listings on things like vintage computer equipment don't matter to them. We're a small enough part of their market that they can afford to lose us. They only care about popular and lucrative mass-market items, like designer-brand clothes and iPads and iPhones.

Stone
August 15th, 2014, 09:41 AM
If you want to state your point a little more eloquently, you could say that ebay is identical to a silent auction.No, that's incorrect. It's not identical. In a silent auction you pay what you bid, period. In an eBay auction you don't necessarily pay what you bid. You won't pay more but you might pay less -- even a lot less. So they're not identical. In fact, they're not even close in some situations.

JDallas
August 15th, 2014, 11:11 AM
eBay is...advertising..."virtually all" items have a money-back guarantee...those of us who do "as-is" listings on things like vintage computer equipment don't matter to them...
Its like eBay considers frivolous returns to be an online equivalent to pre-auction merchandise browsing.

Who would have predicted that eBay would have stuck the seller with the cost of that? :)

Shouldn't eBay pay for the cost ramifications of their half-baked policies? Well, eventually they'll pay one way or another.

Chuck(G)
August 15th, 2014, 12:26 PM
There are quite a number of people who tread eBay as a silent auction--I do. I use a sniping service for almost everything. If my bid wins for less than my snipe maximum, I consider it as a bonus. But if my maximum is the winning bid, I'm not upset in the least.

I refuse to engage in the bidding "wars" that eBay seems to be so fond of.

Ole Juul
August 15th, 2014, 02:36 PM
I dunno, Ole. I can see everything I bought for the last three years, selectable by year. So I can view everything from January, 2012 thru today. Go back and re-check your Purchase history.


I just went and looked and it says "last 60 days", but because you insisted, I fooled around some more and discovered that some more clicking is needed. And indeed, there it was! Sheesh! This kind of interface pisses me off. If I'd known that I would have made a couple of purchases from the same place I originally did. So in this case the seller gets screwed. Of course, I'm probably unusual in that I don't have the patience to figure out the game. To me Ebay is a just a place to buy stuff.

Anyway, thanks for that Stone. :)

Great Hierophant
August 15th, 2014, 03:31 PM
That being said, I would like to see ebay allow open bidding (ie. bidding doesn't stop at a fixed time, but rather after a fixed time after the last bid). It's a subtle change, but would mean potentially more opportunity (ie. money) for sellers.

Quibids does something like that, but you have to pay to bid and you have to buy a package of bids. I don't see auctions slowing down for quite a while when they increase by a penny.

Great Hierophant
August 15th, 2014, 03:33 PM
The concept of the "as-is" language in an auction is another way of saying "no warranty" and consequently "no returns or money back." However, even "as-is" has its limitations. If I show an item in good condition and ship something otherwise, then that is not "as-is", its "bait-and-switch." Similarly, if I package a PCB poorly and the buyer gets it snapped in two, I have something to answer for. But if I say "as-is, unable to test" or "worked for me the last time I tried it, but selling as-is", then the buyer should have no recourse if it fails to work.

I do not think it is reasonable to assume that a thirty year old personal computer or computer equipment is guaranteed to work. Vintage electronics can fail at any time for any reason. eBay still allows sellers to refuse to accept returns, so in my opinion, this hurts people who are not clear in their auction listings.

Stone
August 15th, 2014, 04:13 PM
The concept of the "as-is" language in an auction is another way of saying "no warranty" and consequently "no returns or money back."This terminology in the item's description has no value whatsoever. If the listing category is "used" then it's got to work or a refund is in order. It must be 'listed' as "for parts or not working" in order not to qualify for a refund if it doesn't work. Those are eBay's rules.

1944GPW
August 15th, 2014, 04:50 PM
For me, eBay has been the gateway to acquiring things on a global level playing field. Things that in where I live, Australia, could virtually never be found yet appear from time to time in the US.
The worst two eBay changes for me personally have been the discontinuation of wildcard search patterns coinciding with the search term length reduction, and the ridiculous 'Global Shipping Program' scheme involving Pitney Bowes.
Because of the GSP, prices for shipping even small items to Australia have absolutely skyrocketed to outrageous levels and the sellers are not even aware this happens. For example, half an ounce of Lego pieces can attract a shipping cost of $50 USD.
Pitney Bowes claim they pay the destination customs and sales taxes but here in Oz we do not have taxes on imports unless the value is over $1000 so it's a real scam.

Al Kossow
August 15th, 2014, 05:09 PM
bidding doesn't stop at a fixed time, but rather after a fixed time after the last bid). It's a subtle change, but would mean potentially more opportunity (ie. money) for sellers.

There was a site that worked that way.
I used it ONCE.
After an auction dragged on for SIX HOURS after it was supposed to end thanks to someone putting in a minimum increase just before it would end, I never went back.

Chuck(G)
August 15th, 2014, 05:37 PM
Yahoo! auctions worked that way. I think Excite did as well. I don't remember onSale, but generally it was worth the trouble--they had interesting stuff.

Tiberian Fiend
August 17th, 2014, 04:14 PM
I wish I had the money and experience to make an eBay competitor. I could make a metric shitton of money.

rmay635703
September 23rd, 2014, 05:31 PM
I wish I had the money and experience to make an eBay competitor. I could make a metric shitton of money.
Epier was functionally just as good or better than ebay (less bandwidth, simple to the point) But very few buyers would use their service, without enough eyeballs you will have lots of sellers but noone to buy it.


I got no problem with that considering some of the times I bought something from China I ended up getting burned because it might be pennies for them but I gotta pay $20 to send it back.
For everyone else, you better quit wasting your time with fancy looking listings and just describe the damn thing, along with taking proper photographs and packing it well. You know, the stuff you should be doing anyways.

These people are scum anyways.

Oh, shut up.

Well if CHINA is the problem perhaps their policy should only apply to china (AKA foreign sellers)

Proper photographs and packing aren't the issue on 99% of the items, its usually dicks who are wishy washy and didn't really want to bid what they did.

Hence why I won't use ebay unless I am forced to.

Ebay has sucked since about 2005 when all the changes started and it got so flooded with useless crap that individuals don't stand a chance for their listings to be seen, let alone bid on.

Ah well.

Unknown_K
September 23rd, 2014, 06:24 PM
As a buyer ebay has been fine for me, except for their screwing up the search function.

There are other places to sell off computer related items. Heck if the hobby grows much more there might even be a viable alternative for ebay.

rmay635703
September 25th, 2014, 09:06 AM
As a buyer ebay has been fine for me, except for their screwing up the search function.


People who don't sell much (like me) get their listings put down to the bottom most of the time due to the detailed feedback, of which I have none, although everything else is all positive.

I too have had OK luck buying (with a couple exceptions over the last 15 years), its just the selling side that has gotten more and more irritating.

Any more I only use ebay when I simply can't find what I need any other way, if I could buy the stuff outside ebay I would but no dice, the stuff I am looking for is too specific.

Also the fact that you need so much power to even be able to get the listing process to start is good reason not to use ebay as a seller.

Ah well.