PDA

View Full Version : nostalga



shane
October 30th, 2003, 02:55 AM
CD32-DISPOSABLE HERO will games ever be the same again?

Erik
October 30th, 2003, 05:53 AM
Call me a heathen but I'm not familiar with that game.

What makes it so special? :D

Erik

shane
October 30th, 2003, 03:19 PM
this game was released by gremlin graphics ,i think about 94. it was a r-type style game with aga graphics and a great techno sound track,maybe i am looking through rose coloured glasses but i think the game still stands up today.

Erik
October 30th, 2003, 03:44 PM
maybe i am looking through rose coloured glasses but i think the game still stands up today.

You might be, but I don't think so.

There are tons of games that still hold up today in spite of their "crude" nature by modern graphical and sound standards.

IMO playability is the key and the original Colossal Cave adventure is still far more playable then any number of modern high-tech marvels that require the top-end PCs to run over 30 frames a second.

And that's just one example.

Erik

shane
October 31st, 2003, 10:50 PM
hello erik why dont programers put the same thought into games as they use to back in the eightys, graphics are great but what about gameplay?

Erik
November 1st, 2003, 07:12 AM
I'm not exactly sure, but I am going to take a few guesses.

First off, programmers back in the day were very limited in the resources they could bring to the table. They usually had 8 bit processors, low-rez graphics, minimal sound and, at best, 48K or so of RAM to work with. Without all of the bells and whistles the gameplay was about all that they could use to attract and keep players.

Secondly, programmers used to work alone or in very small teams. Nowadays a typical big-name video game is created by a shop of 15, 20 or even more developers each working on some aspect of the game (graphics, sound, level creation, etc.) One or two are responsible for maintianing order in the chaos, but they don't have the same focus or control of the old game "craftsmen."

Finally, and this might be the biggest problem, game creation has gone corporate. Back in the day a programmer would create their game and market it to a software company for sale. They worked on it until they were done and that was that. Today game makers work towards a variety of deadlines most of which have nothing to do with when the game is finished. These newer games are, therefore, often released incomplete or even completely non-functional.

That's my $.02 anyway.

Erik

shane
November 1st, 2003, 05:16 PM
Erik thankyou for replying to my questions.I have had access to the internet for 3 years now,but this is the first time i have posted to a forum.i hope i am not being trivial. shane

Erik
November 1st, 2003, 07:58 PM
Erik thankyou for replying to my questions.I have had access to the internet for 3 years now,but this is the first time i have posted to a forum.i hope i am not being trivial.

You're quite welcome. I'm a big fan of games (when I have time for them) so I love talking about them.

I hope you are enjoying the "forum experience" and that you keep visiting.

Erik