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JonB
September 3rd, 2014, 07:11 AM
Hi

I want to ask what people recommend (and why) for the following on CP/M computers:-

- Text editing
- C programming (with symbolic debugger)
- Assembler / debugger
- Build (make system)

If you have links to download that would be very nice too!

Cheers

JonB

PS, I'll be posting this on the Tandy forum, too.

Oscar
September 3rd, 2014, 02:56 PM
Hi,



- Text editing

ZDE is my favourite. It uses WordStar keystrokes, which is great if you have them etched into your mind. But even if you don't, it's worth thinking about: lightweight and quick.


- C programming (with symbolic debugger)

I use Aztec C because it feels like a standard K&R compiler without strange limitations. Also, there's HiTech C, very good too and lighter/faster. C debuggers, AFAIK, don't exist. You use a debugger on the resulting assembler code from the C compiler, but that is very much not the same of course.


- Assembler / debugger

I use Microsoft's M80/L80 simply out of habit. It does Z80 and 8080 mnemonics and is just good. There are plenty of alternatives, some of them faster (ZMAC and ZASM). LinkZ from MicroCode is a faster replacement for L80, and their DebugZ is an excellent (maybe the best?) debugger.

Still, DDTZ is the debugger I use. Just simple, light, all I need. It comes in a version with 8080 mnemonics (despite being called DDTZ) and a version with Z80 mnemonics, inconveniently also called DDTZ. You'd want the latter (sometimes renamed to DDTZ80) for Z80 work obviously.


- Build (make system)

Submit. All you need for the limited level of complexity on 8 bit machines.

For really big projects, a great example of a build/make setup is RomWBW (http://n8vem-sbc.pbworks.com/w/page/49174399/RomWBW) from the N8VEM project. But that's cross-compiling on a modern PC. Which really is what you want with that size of project...


If you have links to download that would be very nice too!


Since doing a VCFE exhibit of N8VEM computers last year, I keep up a web page http://obsolescence.wix.com/obsolescence#!n8vemimage/c1v04 that contains the CP/M tools above with manuals. (And all other software that I considered CP/M essentials - but it's a personal preference of course). All programs are configured for VT100. Click on the "Download Tool Set" button further down on the page and look in the TO_IMG directory. It contains all files. The PDF booklet gives an overview of what is where (and quickstarts on how to use the software).

The one programming language that I would like to add for quick projects is a lesser-known one called ZBasic. It treats you as if it was a Basic interpreter, but generates compiled, fast, compact stand alone executables. Amazing program, almost as smooth as Turbo Pascal. I never understood why it was not world-famous in the CP/M universe, definitely worth a try:
program (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_jM3_1AFMbMRC1CMlliOHE2TkE/edit?usp=sharing), manual (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_jM3_1AFMbMVGJocHh2SGZ0YmM/edit?usp=sharing).

commodorejohn
September 3rd, 2014, 03:46 PM
ZDE is definitely tops for text editing. Fast, reasonably full-featured, and surprisingly lightweight.

billdeg
September 3rd, 2014, 08:22 PM
If you're using a Model 4 use something made for the model 4. Montezuma CP/M will run the most applications made for the model 4. I'd start with that for sure.
b

JonB
September 6th, 2014, 03:54 AM
Thanks all, I will seek them out!

@billdeg, yep, I will install Montezuma CP/M once I have the means to transfer software, but the M4 isn't the only CP/M machine I have (got an Amstrad 6128 plus a pair of 8256s, they both support CP/M and I just committed to buying an Intertec Superbrain QD... so I guess things are going to be very "CPM-ey" round these parts for a while..