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View Full Version : Well looks like my XT-IDE is outdated....



Shadow Lord
September 10th, 2014, 08:41 AM
I guess pretty soon you won't be able to find IDE drives anymore either:

Racetrack Memory (http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/04/ibm-wants-to-kill-the-hard-drive/)

Chuck(G)
September 10th, 2014, 09:19 AM
I couldn't get the comments to show on the article, but isn't this idea of "racetrack" magnetic memory pretty much similar to "bubble memory"? Is IBM dredging this up again because the patents have expired?

KC9UDX
September 10th, 2014, 09:23 AM
I read about this (not necessarily IBM's work?) 6 or 7 years ago, and thought the same thing. Why not just call it bubble memory?

Stone
September 10th, 2014, 09:38 AM
I guess pretty soon you won't be able to find IDE drives anymore either...Great! Send me all your outdated crap -- I'll pay the shipping costs. :-)

MikeS
September 10th, 2014, 11:09 AM
Great! Send me all your outdated crap -- I'll pay the shipping costs. :-)Yeah, they need not worry; between you and me there's a good supply...

k2x4b524[
September 10th, 2014, 09:21 PM
with all this new tech coming out, racetrack memory sounds good, and like an older technology, maybe modern tech has caught up to the idea finally, kinda like the 747-8 model that was thought up in the 60's and 70's, the engines finally caught up and hence 747-8. maybe bubble memory tech has caught up.

But i know this. If that catches on, mechanical drives will floor in price and everyone that has one will be wanting to be rid of them rock bottom, face it guys, if this racetrack takes off, it will be raining IDE drives.

Chuck(G)
September 10th, 2014, 09:58 PM
Not SATA?

Agent Orange
September 11th, 2014, 08:53 AM
with all this new tech coming out, racetrack memory sounds good, and like an older technology, maybe modern tech has caught up to the idea finally, kinda like the 747-8 model that was thought up in the 60's and 70's, the engines finally caught up and hence 747-8. maybe bubble memory tech has caught up.

But i know this. If that catches on, mechanical drives will floor in price and everyone that has one will be wanting to be rid of them rock bottom, face it guys, if this racetrack takes off, it will be raining IDE drives.

You may have hit it. Check this out: https://sites.google.com/site/racetrackmemoryspark/customization/dominant-design

Shadow Lord
September 11th, 2014, 10:37 AM
You may have hit it. Check this out: https://sites.google.com/site/racetrackmemoryspark/customization/dominant-design


Interesting piece although a bit dated now specially given that HP has NOT released RRAM AFAIK.

Tor
September 11th, 2014, 07:36 PM
Well, Flash memory doesn't keep its contents over time. So SSDs are not the solution for replacing HDDs, other than for pure speedup purposes. How's bubble memory (aka racetrack) in that respect? I skimmed over a couple of articles but didn't find anything. May have overlooked it of course. But in any case, to replace HDDs the replacement must allow for safety of data even if stored on a shelf for a long, long time. Unlike your "safe" memory stick..

krebizfan
September 11th, 2014, 09:16 PM
Racetrack memory isn't in a marketable product yet. IBM hasn't managed to convert much of their storage research into something to sell. Once prototypes start showing up, then the technology can be evaluated. The research suggests power draw might preclude use of racetrack memory from many systems.

KC9UDX
September 12th, 2014, 01:24 AM
SSDs don't have to have flash memory. The original designs did not, the modern ones are because that's the cheapest route.

Bubble memory is theoretically permanent, but it is not infallible. I've had to replace bubble memory boards in twenty-year-old machines. I wouldn't consider that a problem. Usually the support circuitry fails, I don't recall any instances of data being corrupted, but I assume it happens. I don't believe there is a data storage medium out there that isn't going to have data corruption in the long term.

I think, had solid-state RAM not ended up so much cheaper than core, we'd have core-based mass storage by now. You know, like SSD's, but you can't call them that, because technically core RAM isn't solid-state. Bubble memory is just sequential-access core memory. It's inherently smaller.