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View Full Version : Need device driver for Toshiba MK1926FCV HDD



Jeffrey Stylus
September 12th, 2014, 08:08 PM
I've got an old 814MB 2.5" IDE hard drive from an old mid 90's era laptop that I have converted into a USB external drive.
When I plug it in, it is detected by Windows but then asks for a device driver. I have searched high and low but have not been able to locate a device driver for this particular hard-drive online.
Anyone know where I can get this driver? I have found pay sites that have it but they want a credit card number and want to charge monthly fees for access to thousands of drivers, but all I want and need is this one driver. HELP!! Its a Toshiba MK1926FCV (HDD2517).
Thanks.
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NeXT
September 12th, 2014, 09:14 PM
It doesn't need a driver. If anything, force windows to use the generic IDE/ATA storage driver and it will work.

Chuck(G)
September 12th, 2014, 09:34 PM
Are you certain that Windows isn't asking for the device driver for the USB-to-IDE converter?

k2x4b524[
September 12th, 2014, 09:57 PM
It's probably asking for the driver. That or the adapter doesn't know what to do with the drive only being 814mb, i've run into this with several usb converters and any drive under 1 or 2gb. What is the external enclosure or adapter you are using? What version of windows are you trying to bolt it to?

krebizfan
September 12th, 2014, 09:58 PM
I have a Toshiba 300MB IDE laptop drive that worked right away in a USB enclosure. Do you at least see the drive or enclosure in Device Manager?

Just to be on the safe side, which Windows version are you using? And what enclosure? How is the enclosure powered? The older hard drive will need more power than one might expect. Mine needs two USB connectors to be plugged into a powered hub. Unpowered front panel USB ports or from a hub without power socket or a single USB connector just don't provide the juice. Win98 needed special drivers for every enclosure. Some very early enclosures won't work with Windows 7 or 8 and the generic USB storage device drivers. Nonetheless, the drive needs no drivers. The enclosure might but you are generally better served with a newer enclosure.

Some other possibilities:
The drive has a dynamic disk overlay that lies about the drives specifications which confuses the USB enclosure.
The drive has a virus. XP and later won't recognize drives that have flawed boot sectors.
The drive is bad.
The enclosure is bad or has a flawed USB to IDE converter chip.

If the enclosure works correctly with other IDE drives on that system, then you should try to find a system with internal IDE connectors and a laptop to desktop IDE adapter cable and mounting. Internally mounting the hard drive makes it more likely to work because you don't have as many other pieces of code in the way.

My belief is that the drive likely has a DDO installed. It will be easy to mount internally and reformat the drive. Getting a system to recognize the drive with its current format so any files can be recovered is harder.

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 08:49 AM
Are you certain that Windows isn't asking for the device driver for the USB-to-IDE converter?

Hi Chuck(G),
Windows Vista & Windows XP (I tried it on two separate computers) are specifically asking for a MK1926FCV HDD device driver.

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 08:54 AM
It's probably asking for the driver. That or the adapter doesn't know what to do with the drive only being 814mb, i've run into this with several usb converters and any drive under 1 or 2gb. What is the external enclosure or adapter you are using? What version of windows are you trying to bolt it to?

Hi k2x,
I'm using an Acomdata ide to usb converter box that works fine with other hard drives. I'm also using a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter between the box and the drive. I have tried to bolt it to both Windows XP and Vista with the same results, its asking for an MK1926FCV HDD device driver.

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 09:06 AM
I have a Toshiba 300MB IDE laptop drive that worked right away in a USB enclosure. Do you at least see the drive or enclosure in Device Manager?

Just to be on the safe side, which Windows version are you using? And what enclosure? How is the enclosure powered? The older hard drive will need more power than one might expect. Mine needs two USB connectors to be plugged into a powered hub. Unpowered front panel USB ports or from a hub without power socket or a single USB connector just don't provide the juice. Win98 needed special drivers for every enclosure. Some very early enclosures won't work with Windows 7 or 8 and the generic USB storage device drivers. Nonetheless, the drive needs no drivers. The enclosure might but you are generally better served with a newer enclosure.

Some other possibilities:
The drive has a dynamic disk overlay that lies about the drives specifications which confuses the USB enclosure.
The drive has a virus. XP and later won't recognize drives that have flawed boot sectors.
The drive is bad.
The enclosure is bad or has a flawed USB to IDE converter chip.

If the enclosure works correctly with other IDE drives on that system, then you should try to find a system with internal IDE connectors and a laptop to desktop IDE adapter cable and mounting. Internally mounting the hard drive makes it more likely to work because you don't have as many other pieces of code in the way.

My belief is that the drive likely has a DDO installed. It will be easy to mount internally and reformat the drive. Getting a system to recognize the drive with its current format so any files can be recovered is harder.
Hi Krebizfan,
I have tried the drive on two different computers: XP and Vista.
Its an Acomdata enclosure that is externally powered by a 12V, 2A power cube.
The hard-drive (which is a 2.5" ide) requires 5V, 0.7A, the same as every other hard drive that works in the adapter box.
The hard-drive itself works fine when plugged into its original ide slot on the old laptop it was in.
Windows is specifically asking for a MK1926FCV device driver file.

Chuck(G)
September 13th, 2014, 09:18 AM
Windows is apparently using the only device information it can obtain. The problem is with the USB-to-IDE bridge. Since I don't know which Acomdata box you have, you'll have to find the driver yourself here's a possible driver source (http://drivers.downloadatoz.com/vendor_acomdata/).

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 09:26 AM
Here are some screen captures of what Vista is asking for.
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Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 09:30 AM
Windows is apparently using the only device information it can obtain. The problem is with the USB-to-IDE bridge. Since I don't know which Acomdata box you have, you'll have to find the driver yourself here's a possible driver source (http://drivers.downloadatoz.com/vendor_acomdata/).
Hi Chuck(G),
Thanks for your help, but, I can install other hard drives into the Acomdata box and they are detected and work fine. Its just this one that does not. See the screen captures from the previous post.

Chuck(G)
September 13th, 2014, 09:52 AM
After a bit of research, here's my best guess. The MK1926FCV does not support UDMA2 transfers; it seems to support only PIO mode 0-4. No doubt your USB bridge controller is expecting DMA mode support and is essentially saying that it doesn't know what to do with the drive.

That's just an educated guess. One of the drive diagnostic utilities run with the drive directly connected to an IDE controller might confirm this.

Stone
September 13th, 2014, 09:55 AM
As stated *previously*, by k2x4b524[, these USB devices will not always allow for smaller IDE drives to be connected. It's just the nature of the beast. There's nothing to be done about it other than to use the drives it can handle. My Rocketfish USB housing won't let me use any smaller drives with Vista, either. FWIW, Chuck's 'educated guess' may be spot on!

krebizfan
September 13th, 2014, 10:17 AM
There are references to such things happening with Acomdata enclosures. I have an Acomdata enclosure and did not like it. Sometimes, multiple insertions can get the system to recognize it as a generic hard drive on USB. Acomdata went out of business about 5 years ago so not much help there. Is it the weird Acomdata enclosure that includes a fake floppy to create security on the hard drive? Those are too much trouble.

Since the drive works in the laptop, can you find the partition information and drive specifications as reported there? You might be able to get the drive to work with the enclosure by removing all partitioning information but you will lose all the information on the drive. Otherwise, try a different enclosure.

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 11:17 AM
After a bit of research, here's my best guess. The MK1926FCV does not support UDMA2 transfers; it seems to support only PIO mode 0-4. No doubt your USB bridge controller is expecting DMA mode support and is essentially saying that it doesn't know what to do with the drive.

That's just an educated guess. One of the drive diagnostic utilities run with the drive directly connected to an IDE controller might confirm this.
Chuck(G),
The specs I found online describe both PIO mode 4 and DMA mode 2 16.6 MB/s.

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 11:18 AM
There are references to such things happening with Acomdata enclosures. I have an Acomdata enclosure and did not like it. Sometimes, multiple insertions can get the system to recognize it as a generic hard drive on USB. Acomdata went out of business about 5 years ago so not much help there. Is it the weird Acomdata enclosure that includes a fake floppy to create security on the hard drive? Those are too much trouble.

Since the drive works in the laptop, can you find the partition information and drive specifications as reported there? You might be able to get the drive to work with the enclosure by removing all partitioning information but you will lose all the information on the drive. Otherwise, try a different enclosure.
Krebizfan,
I may ultimately end up trying what you suggest. No, time now. Will try later and let you know.

Chuck(G)
September 13th, 2014, 12:37 PM
Chuck(G),
The specs I found online describe both PIO mode 4 and DMA mode 2 16.6 MB/s.

There's something that the adapter doesn't like about the drive, or else it would be accessible as a generic storage device. It could be that the available modes aren't reflected in the response to the IDENTIFY command or that there is something strange about the response.

Jeffrey Stylus
September 13th, 2014, 06:01 PM
There's something that the adapter doesn't like about the drive, or else it would be accessible as a generic storage device. It could be that the available modes aren't reflected in the response to the IDENTIFY command or that there is something strange about the response.

Hooked it up using an ide to firewire converter box and it worked immediately. Go figure. Problem solved. Thanks for your help Chuck(G).