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falter
September 22nd, 2014, 08:23 PM
Hi there,

I was wondering if anyone happened to be in possession of *colour* photos of the interior of Don Lancaster's TV Typewriter prototype? Specifically the colors of the PCBs used. Although my replica won't be too exact, I'm hoping to get critical details right. Still trying to figure out what he wrapped the case in (vinyl?)?

falter
September 26th, 2014, 09:16 AM
I got more answers from Don Lancaster himself. He's fantastic!

So apparently the prototype boards were, as I suspected, not the same as the later SWTPC ones. He confirmed SWTPC's involvement came much later. He said the boards were G10 green, and that original artwork was '4x tape and dots followed by litho camera reduction'. I sort of understand that but am wondering if anyone knows a) if I can find a good, easy to understand primer on how all that works and b) if it's still possible to replicate the exact processes he used back then?

And for those interested, the case is indeed wrapped in vinyl.

MikeS
September 26th, 2014, 09:33 AM
Yeah, I've still got a project or two somewhere wrapped in MacTac, bubbles and all... ;-)

I thought I still had some rolls of tape, pads etc. from the 'good old days', but all I found was a dried-up resist pen; mind you, if I did find it it probably wouldn't be sticky any longer.

Circuit-stik was the most common, although I believe Brady also had a line of PCB drafting materials; LetraSet was also used a fair bit for the lettering etc.


http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTYwMFgxNDg4/$(KGrHqRHJB!E-EpGmjDbBP)QeojWkw~~60_35.JPG

I doubt that any of this stuff is still available today; the more modern equivalent is using a computer and laser printer to produce the resist masks.

falter
September 26th, 2014, 11:48 AM
Yeah, I've still got a project or two somewhere wrapped in MacTac, bubbles and all... ;-)

I thought I still had some rolls of tape, pads etc. from the 'good old days', but all I found was a dried-up resist pen; mind you, if I did find it it probably wouldn't be sticky any longer.

Circuit-stik was the most common, although I believe Brady also had a line of PCB drafting materials; LetraSet was also used a fair bit for the lettering etc.


http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTYwMFgxNDg4/$(KGrHqRHJB!E-EpGmjDbBP)QeojWkw~~60_35.JPG

I doubt that any of this stuff is still available today; the more modern equivalent is using a computer and laser printer to produce the resist masks.

Yes I was going for the laser print method, until I realized the prototype boards wouldnt have been based on the SWTPC patterns in the mag. I'm still.coming to an understanding of how these processes worked.. would those g10 PCBs have been like the new ones today... and you etch the unneeded copper away?