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Dwight Elvey
October 1st, 2014, 07:00 AM
I've finally got a project for an Arduino. I want to use the
maga one with the 16U2 or 8U2 for the extra I/O.
I want to read in 8 digits of BCD frequency counter output and
send it serially to a computer.
It looks like I can do the entire thing with just the one board and
cables.
I want to go cheap and buy one of the Chinese ones from HongKong.
Guess what, Hong Kong is shut down. I don't know when I might
see my order?
What a pain. I guess I'll have to wait a little while.
AAAAaaaaaahhhhh!
Dwight

deathshadow
October 1st, 2014, 11:34 AM
You might want to look at the Teesny series.
https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/

Arduino sketch compatible, the 2.0 and 2.0++ are atmega hardware, the 3.0 gets you a 48mhz ARM3... for typically less than the price of an arduino. You get one with the pins already in it you can just plop it down into a breadboard.

The new Teensy 3.1 is ridiculously badass for the price -- 72mhz, 64k of RAM and 256k of flash for twenty bucks.

Dwight Elvey
October 1st, 2014, 01:43 PM
I'd need to use the 2.0++. It is already twice as expensive as
the arduino I'd planned to use.
I need 32+ I/O's and I'm not that interested in building an
additional board to deal with expanding it.
I don't need the high speed and the free arduino development
tools are also a plus.
These are cool units, though. I wish these were around when I
was first learning about uPs. I used to hand assemble code for
8080, 8048 and 6502.
I thought they were really cool. Now these tiny boards have
chips running at much greater speed and are most of a system
on a chip.
I went ahead and ordered a board listed as being from Cancun.
I suspect it will still have to go through Hong Kong.
Dwight

deathshadow
October 1st, 2014, 07:59 PM
Given a normal 16u2 based Arduino only has 20 I/O exposed on it, LESS than a teensy 2.0, that doesn't entirely make sense.

Just which one did you get? You may be in for a disappointment... unless you got a 2560 or Due, and those usually run twice what a Teensy 3.0 costs. ($50 USD and up)

Chuck(G)
October 1st, 2014, 09:07 PM
Have you considered the Digilent Uno32 (http://www.digilentinc.com/Products/Detail.cfm?Prod=CHIPKIT-UNO32)? 32-bit 80 MHz, 42 I/O. The devkit makes it look like a very fast Arduino. Less than $27.

Dwight Elvey
October 2nd, 2014, 05:28 AM
Given a normal 16u2 based Arduino only has 20 I/O exposed on it, LESS than a teensy 2.0, that doesn't entirely make sense.

Just which one did you get? You may be in for a disappointment... unless you got a 2560 or Due, and those usually run twice what a Teensy 3.0 costs. ($50 USD and up)

Yes, it is a 2560.
They are a lot cheaper than you think.
Dwight

codeman
October 2nd, 2014, 06:49 AM
Can't get better than a Nucleo board from ST $10.33
Tools are free and real not the crappy arduino stuff .

STM32F401RET6 microcontroller with LQFP64 package
ARM Cortex-M4 CPU with FPU at 84MHz
512 KBytes Flash
12bit ADC 2.4 Msps up to 10 channels
Up to 10 timers
Up to 3x I2C, 3x USARTs, 4x SPIs, SDIO
USB 2.0 Full Speed with on-chip PHY
96bit unique ID
Two types of extension resources
Arduino Uno Revision 3 connectivity
STMicroelectronics Morpho extension pin headers for full access to all STM32F401RET6 I/Os
Flexible board power supply: USB VBUS or external source (3.5 V, 5 V, 7 V - 12 V)
On-board ST-LINK/V2.1 interfacing with the PC, with three different communication channels via USB
Debug and programming port, to use STM32 Nucleo wth standard toolchains/debuggers/programmers
Virtual Com port to send back traces to the PC
Mass storage (USB Disk drive) for drag'n'drop programming

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/STMicroelectronics/NUCLEO-F401RE/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMsiJ7OlpASoDs02FkilV9qJ45ytzfCPQLo%3d

ken

Dwight Elvey
October 2nd, 2014, 12:32 PM
Wow, all cool setups.
I didn't realize there were so many competing at this level.
I'm sure what I'm getting what will work. There is not likely anything
else I'll be using it for as I expect to just put it into a box.
Chuck's board is cool then so is Ken's. The Teesny has a nice small
form factor. All candidates for future projects.
I have to admit Ken's has the most attractive price and available from
Mouser.
I am curious about the brake-away part of the board. I assume that is
the serial links and programming interface. There are a lot of arduino
expansion boards and be connector compatible is a significant plus.
Mouser has them listed for cheaper than I can get them on ebay
( of course, there is shipping to consider ).
I wonder what other interesting processor modules are out there.
Dwight

Chuck(G)
October 2nd, 2014, 12:44 PM
Some time ago, I received a little brochure of new MCU devkits. The number out there is really staggering. Olimex has a nice site that offers some information regarding advantages/disadvantages of various platforms. Heck, even Schmartboard is in on the game, even offering PSoC prototyping boards.

codeman
October 2nd, 2014, 12:44 PM
I did the software and prototype of me WD1002 Hard Drive emulator with one of those ST Boards .
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?44078-My-SD-Card-Hard-Drive-Emulator
and if you really want fun stuff the STM32CubeMX tool from ST will let you config all the pins and generate all the startup code for it .

ken

Doan Bao
October 7th, 2014, 02:02 AM
calm down, Asia have a sentence "Wait is happy"