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jmetal88
February 6th, 2015, 07:21 PM
I was given the opportunity to save this machine from my university handing it over to e-waste, and almost didn't take it. But in the end, I decided to save it on the last day it was available. I can't use it yet because I don't have a keyboard cable for it, but I found someone willing to sell me one at a fairly cheap price ($15-ish) and it should be on its way to me shortly. I also saved a 16-track tape drive for it (haven't really checked that out to see what shape it's in yet) and bought an external SCSI CD drive off eBay so I can reinstall the OS in the event I can't log in to the one already installed (highly likely, and my school did have a drawer full of installation discs on hand that I was able to take -- you may have seen my 'for sale' thread, since I most certainly don't need to keep all of them).

Anyway, I finally took a few pictures of it. This thing sure takes up a lot of space!

226222262322624

paul
February 9th, 2015, 07:16 PM
Nice ... what model is it, 725 or 735?
These are solid, industrial quality machines and definitely worth keeping. I have a 735 that I got from work about 15 years ago and it's my most prized machine (after the AT.) The only weak areas are the power supply and the cooling of the hard disk bays. You are lucky to have found a keyboard and cable, hope you have a HIL mouse too.
One thing you can do assuming you have a mouse and two hard disks is install NextStep 3.3 on one. Gives you an idea of where OSX came from.

There are ways to get in if you don't know the root password.

gslick
February 9th, 2015, 07:31 PM
Nice ... what model is it, 725 or 735?

The conclusion he had from looking at the CPU card (A1094-66510) was that the machine is a model 720.

commodorejohn
February 9th, 2015, 08:08 PM
Ooh, fun :) I love these weird little CPU designs that never caught on...

Caluser2000
February 9th, 2015, 09:21 PM
Here's a pic of one complete http://www.hpmuseum.net/images/720-52.jpg Quite a wide looking beasty.

The HP ads are a bit of a hoot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLTh4uVJduI&feature=related

paul
February 10th, 2015, 12:16 PM
The conclusion he had from looking at the CPU card (A1094-66510) was that the machine is a model 720.

OK, now I see that now.

It would be more readable jmetal88 if all the posts related to this particular effort were in the same thread :)

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 11:13 AM
Sorry, I just didn't think about making a thread specifically about the computer until after I had posted the other stuff, haha. And for whatever reason, the forum wasn't letting me know I had unread posts here. Hmm.

Anyway, this thing has some problems that weren't immediately apparent. The big thing is that one of the capacitors in the power supply exploded on me the other day. I went ahead and replaced all the capacitors in that bank (2200uF, 25V each) and the machine still works, but it won't turn on EVERY time, just sometimes, so I still have a problem somewhere. I thought maybe the power switch was iffy, but I just tore it down and checked the switch and it seems fine (I haven't been able to get it to conduct improperly at all) so maybe there's still some issue in the power supply that only manifests after the components are warmed up.

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 11:16 AM
Nice ... what model is it, 725 or 735?
These are solid, industrial quality machines and definitely worth keeping. I have a 735 that I got from work about 15 years ago and it's my most prized machine (after the AT.) The only weak areas are the power supply and the cooling of the hard disk bays. You are lucky to have found a keyboard and cable, hope you have a HIL mouse too.
One thing you can do assuming you have a mouse and two hard disks is install NextStep 3.3 on one. Gives you an idea of where OSX came from.

There are ways to get in if you don't know the root password.

Since it's a 720 (sorry I didn't post that) it doesn't appear to be one of the models that will run NextSTEP. :(

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 11:20 AM
The keyboard cable has been shipped finally, and I have tracking info on it now. So assuming I can get past the power supply problems, I should be up and running on Friday.

I did not find an HIL mouse with the machine, so if I decide I want one I'll have to buy one later. I was planning on just seeing if I could get a driver for a serial mouse set up.

PrintStar
February 11th, 2015, 12:55 PM
Ooh, fun :) I love these weird little CPU designs that never caught on...

HP PA-RISC was a relatively successful CPU design. I used them for work for quite a while around 2003-2007. They used to be a fully supported Debian GNU/Linux architecture (my HP 715 and Visualize B2000 both run Debian) if you don't like HP-UX. HP moved on eventually to Itanium (it was a joint venture between HP and Intel, after all), but PA-RISC was developed through the mid-2000s. It maybe wasn't popular with consumers, but PA-RISC was pretty popular in engineering and enterprise computing.

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 01:57 PM
Okay, now I can't get it to turn on at all. The LEDs will briefly flash sometimes, and I can always hear the PC speaker 'click', but it just won't power up. This is really frustrating, especially when this happens right after I spent around $50 to get the rest of the things I need to use it, but before the things all arrived so I don't even get a chance to use it.

bear
February 11th, 2015, 02:02 PM
PSU issue. These things are notorious for that. The potential good news is that it isn't always a failed PSU. The mechanical interface between the PSU module and the chassis isn't particularly robust. I helped out a guy who had one where it would run fine for hours then suddenly reset... turned out that bumping the table or even his kids stomping around in another room was enough to disrupt that connection and then, boom. Hard reset.

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 02:51 PM
Well, my electronics course work is starting to come in handy now.

It LOOKS like I've got a faulty comparator in the power supply. There are three LM239 chips on a vertical board on the inside, and the first indication of any fault is on the first pin of the one set to detect when the power button has been pushed. When the detect line is shorted to ground, the input on the comparator jumps down from around 4V to just under 3V. The pin it's comparing to is around 3.3V, so that jump SHOULD trigger the output of the comparator, which is set up on a 15V rail, and should be outputting around 15V. That doesn't happen. The comparator initially outputs around 0.4V, and then jumps up to just 0.7V.

Incidentally, while the detect pin is transitioning (either I've just made contact with it, or I've just broken contact with it) the power supply briefly comes to life and I see an output voltage of around 2V on the 5V rail. This would explain the dim LED flash and PC speaker click when I press the power button.

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 03:43 PM
And now it looks like the issue is not in the comparator itself, but in something attached to the comparator. I'm not sure what yet. I removed the comparator and soldered one of my own in its place, and I'm getting the exact same output from it.

UPDATE: Got it to power back on for a few more minutes, but I'm not sure why it did. I didn't replace anything, and I haven't figured out what the comparator issue is. All the stuff connected to that part of the comparator (there are a few resistors and a diode) seems to be okay. There is one trace that comes off that comparator and goes to another circuit board, though.

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 05:03 PM
Okay, I'm still not sure what the problem is, but it's definitely something toward the front of the power supply (the part that connects to the computer) and probably something on one of the vertically-oriented circuit boards. I say that because, on a guess, I got out my hot air soldering iron and went over the boards until all the components were nice and hot. After that, the computer was powering up again. If it keeps powering up, maybe I had a cold solder joint and this fixed it. If not, I have some component that's giving me trouble because it's temperature-sensitive.

UPDATE (Again): Okay, I'm pretty sure it HAS to be one of the comparators. It's not the one I thought it was (I don't think), but when I heat up the other two, the power supply starts working again. I just tried swapping the two on that side of the board, and it's working for now, but still seemed like it didn't want to come on at first.

paul
February 11th, 2015, 09:46 PM
Have you checked the rail voltages when it does work with at least the 5V rail loaded? You could remove the backplane so that you can run the PS loaded on the bench with one card plugged in. Perhaps also check the waveforms on a scope.

I would be looking for cracked solder joints first, capacitors second. Very much doubt a semiconductor failure. Certainly true about the PS connector to the backplane being a bit wimpy - lots of parallelled small pins to carry the current, never a good idea.

You could also keep your eye out for a spare PS. And keeping in mind the 9.25 V output is only for the 12V fans, if it all turns to dust you might be able to rig up a PC power supply.

jmetal88
February 11th, 2015, 10:16 PM
Have you checked the rail voltages when it does work with at least the 5V rail loaded? You could remove the backplane so that you can run the PS loaded on the bench with one card plugged in. Perhaps also check the waveforms on a scope.

I would be looking for cracked solder joints first, capacitors second. Very much doubt a semiconductor failure. Certainly true about the PS connector to the backplane being a bit wimpy - lots of parallelled small pins to carry the current, never a good idea.

You could also keep your eye out for a spare PS. And keeping in mind the 9.25 V output is only for the 12V fans, if it all turns to dust you might be able to rig up a PC power supply.

Nah, I haven't had it on long enough to test, so far. But I can try heating the board up again tomorrow and see how it does. If it's not one of the comparators, it's one of the components directly around the comparators. There are some surface mount ceramic caps in that area, but I have no idea what values they are supposed to be.

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 08:08 AM
Okay, this morning I started replacing the ceramic capacitors on that vertical board one by one with 1uF capacitors I had laying around. After about the fifth one, the computer powered up again, although I still can't be sure whether it's due to the capacitor replacement or heating the board with the soldering iron.

I went ahead and ordered new comparators. Even if I don't need them, it'll be nice to have them, and I found a good deal on eBay for 12 comparators at $5 shipped.

EDIT: Nah, it still shut down after a few minutes. I have more work to do.

EDIT 2: Two more capacitors replaced and it's powering up again. I hope I can eventually get it to stay powered up by keeping on with this.

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 08:10 AM
Oh, and to answer Paul's question: Now that it's running again, the 5V rail is at 5.04V, loaded.

NeXT
February 12th, 2015, 09:24 AM
Okay, I'm still not sure what the problem is, but it's definitely something toward the front of the power supply (the part that connects to the computer) and probably something on one of the vertically-oriented circuit boards. I say that because, on a guess, I got out my hot air soldering iron and went over the boards until all the components were nice and hot. After that, the computer was powering up again. If it keeps powering up, maybe I had a cold solder joint and this fixed it. If not, I have some component that's giving me trouble because it's temperature-sensitive.

UPDATE (Again): Okay, I'm pretty sure it HAS to be one of the comparators. It's not the one I thought it was (I don't think), but when I heat up the other two, the power supply starts working again. I just tried swapping the two on that side of the board, and it's working for now, but still seemed like it didn't want to come on at first.

I would like to point out that you are doing an AMAZING job at troubleshooting right now. The fact you were even able to narrow down the fault in a switching power supply goes far beyond what I at least can do.

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 10:55 AM
I would like to point out that you are doing an AMAZING job at troubleshooting right now. The fact you were even able to narrow down the fault in a switching power supply goes far beyond what I at least can do.

Well, I'm about 3 months from graduating an electronics engineering technology program, so that helps quite a bit, haha.

Anyway, after going through and replacing ALL the capacitors on that front board, I'm still having trouble. But it'll boot up if I get the first comparator out of the three nice and hot before powering up the machine, so I'm pretty sure one or more of the comparators has some kind of fault, and if it's not the comparator itself, it might be a cracked trace on the circuit board or something.

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 11:08 AM
In better news, the keyboard cable showed up, and the keyboard appears to be working fine when the machine is powered up (I can navigate the boot menu and such). I still have to heat up that area of the board before I can power the machine on, though. At least now I know the specific area I have to heat up and I can try replacing that comparator first when my new parts get here. I'd try putting my one extra back in again, but honestly, it's a DIP component, and the ones on this board are all surface-mount, so I basically had to solder up 14 individual wires to the thing, which couldn't have been helping the situation any.

EDIT: Yup, I just replaced three more capacitors, this time on the main PCB, near the chip I've been heating up, and I still can't power up the machine unless I directly heat up that first comparator.

EDIT 2: I'm giving it one more shot with swapping the comparators on the board. I had already swapped two, now I've swapped the third one for one of the others, so none of the comparators are in their original locations now. It's powered up, but I don't know if it's the swapping that helped, or if it's once again just the fact that the comparators got heated through my soldering iron.

EDIT 3: Yeah, either multiple comparators are bad, or it's something to do with the board at around the position of the first comparator. Even with the comparators swapped out, I have to heat the board in that position for the computer to power up. Another interesting note, what I've done to the board so far seems to have enabled it to stay powered up for longer periods of time, although if you turn it off it still has trouble turning back on until you heat the board again.

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 02:33 PM
Okay, I need some serious help now. I screwed something up. I think I may have damaged either the I/O or CPU board due to some rapid power cycling. The machine turns on currently, but the PC speaker emits a continuous tone and the machine will not proceed to load the boot ROM. Any ideas?

EDIT: Got it to stop beeping by holding down the 'service' button while powering up a little while ago. But it still didn't boot, and on the next power cycle it started the continuous beeping again.

EDIT 2: Cannot get the behavior from first holding down the 'service' button to repeat. The only thing I can think to do at this point is just leave it off for a while and try again later.

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 03:56 PM
I'm getting to a point where continuing to troubleshoot this just isn't worth the effort. If it magically works tomorrow, great! If not, does anybody want to buy any of the parts from this thing?

EDIT: Okay, now I'm looking at the cost of replacement CPU boards and I/O cards. I see various websites selling them for around $100 each. Doesn't actually seem that bad to me, but it's something I'd probably wait until I've graduated and have a job to buy. But then I go looking for replacement power supplies in case I can't get this one working reliably, and these same kinds of websites are trying to sell them for $700! What the heck?

paul
February 12th, 2015, 08:13 PM
... trying to sell them for $700! What the heck?Those sites are hoping for business customers that have legacy systems that they want working at nearly any cost.

I doubt you would have screwed up any plug-in boards if you haven't applied reverse or over-voltage. And if you have, it's not worth buying new boards.
But to be fair you should be doing PS testing with a dummy load whenever possible.

I'm leaning towards suggesting that you solder heavy wires to the back of the PS receptacle on the backplane to provide GND, +5 and +12 and hook it up to a Baby AT, or less-preferably an ATX PS. In fact thinking about it, you might be able to simply back-feed that power into the unused Molex power wire in the hard disk bay. It's all the same. I think it would at least boot without the negative voltages and as I said, +9 V is for the fans.

But if the troubleshooting is driving you nuts, better to put the project aside for a while so you don't panic and do anything you regret later.

22716

jmetal88
February 12th, 2015, 09:19 PM
Great, I can't get the backplane out now because one of its screws is stripped... I wanna take my vice grips to it, but I can't find them anywhere.

UPDATE: Bought some new vice grips to remove the screw. And holy crap, that had NO thread left on it. Basically, it was a metal peg with a Phillips head on it. I'm going to try the suggestion of an ATX power supply later.

jmetal88
February 13th, 2015, 01:04 PM
Alright, I did some more testing on the power supply today. I'm not sure how critical the -12V rail is, but I was testing the pinout and what appears to be the -12V rail is only putting out -6V. Likewise, the +12V rail is also weak, putting out approximately +10.6V. This is without a load. I am hoping that this is what's causing my boot failure. We'll see once I get an ATX supply wired in. I've noticed in the ATX spec, the power supply is turned on by shorting the green wire to ground, so it looks like I can just hook that up to the existing power switch (all it does is short one pin on the power supply connector to ground) and have this operate somewhat in the way it was originally intended, still.

jmetal88
February 13th, 2015, 02:01 PM
Nah, I think the CPU card or the I/O card or both probably did get messed up from the original power supply cutting in and out so much. The ATX supply powers everything up right away, but I'm still getting a constant tone out of the PC speaker and no booting.

paul
February 14th, 2015, 12:36 PM
The normal startup is a single long and loud tone. Oddly, the service manual does not describe error codes for tones, but for the eight LEDs the list is extensive.

Did you try resetting the firmware by pulling the small button cell, and is that cell in good condition, 3V? I'm assuming you have at least the I/O and CPU cards installed and that you have not recently disturbed the locations of the memory simms on the CPU card?

There is always some hope that the insufficient minus voltages are the problem and that providing those may help?

Oh, last thing, a bit of trivia, if you take the case completely apart you might find a date and signature in one corner.

jmetal88
February 14th, 2015, 02:28 PM
The normal startup is a single long and loud tone. Oddly, the service manual does not describe error codes for tones, but for the eight LEDs the list is extensive.

Did you try resetting the firmware by pulling the small button cell, and is that cell in good condition, 3V? I'm assuming you have at least the I/O and CPU cards installed and that you have not recently disturbed the locations of the memory simms on the CPU card?

There is always some hope that the insufficient minus voltages are the problem and that providing those may help?

Oh, last thing, a bit of trivia, if you take the case completely apart you might find a date and signature in one corner.

Yeah, what's happening is that the startup tone never stops. It just keeps playing. I looked at the LED error codes, and it doesn't match any of them. ALL eight indicator LEDs are on, the power LED is on, and the service LED is off. I've noticed the LEDs do the same thing if I start it up without the CPU and I/O cards installed (in other words, just the power supply hooked up).

I have tried pulling the button cell battery, and it didn't help. I did wire up the negative voltages from the ATX power supply at the same time as the positive voltages. The only difference from running it with the weak/damaged original power supply was that the startup tone was louder. It still never stopped playing it and never displayed anything on screen. I've come to realize the past couple of days how much of a mess my apartment is, though, so I've put the computer 'away' (really, just against the wall in the other room) until my space is somewhat livable again. Always a chance if I just don't mess with it for a while that it'll mysteriously start working again, haha.

jmetal88
February 14th, 2015, 02:38 PM
I'm honestly contemplating ordering another 100MHz oscillator for the CPU card, kind of on a whim, just to see if replacing that helps. I mean, I know if that wasn't working (assuming it's the source of the system clock) you'd have all the symptoms of a dead CPU even if nothing else on the board is damaged, and it's probably going to be the easiest thing to replace. I tried to see if I could locate the clock signal using my oscilloscope and I couldn't, but I don't know if it'd show up even if I did find it since my oscilloscope is only rated for 20MHz signals.

NeXT
February 15th, 2015, 08:20 AM
I think at this point here I would begin to consider if it's worth my time or if I should start looking for someone to give it a new home. It's gone from working to a bad PSU to an unreliable PSU and now to an unreliable PSU with a potentially and completely unknown fault elsewhere in the machine.
You can only have so much fun with a machine when it makes you pull your hair out with problems. I'm not at all educated on these machines so I have no idea what you need to do to reach the PSU. Have you been repeatedly unplugging and replugging boards or cables? Have you checked to make sure that none of these connection points have suffered a bent pin?

jmetal88
February 15th, 2015, 09:29 AM
Eh, right now I'm having fun trying to retrofit an ATX power supply into the case for the original power supply. I'll decide what to do with the rest of the system later.

jmetal88
February 15th, 2015, 11:29 AM
Really, I am *right* on that line where I'm considering trying to part out the machine, though. At the same time, if the CPU card is the thing that's broken and the rest of the system is fine (which I don't really know at this point, but I can hope), the worst case scenario is I buy one of the seven in stock at whatever online store I found for $95 and see if it works. If the I/O card is also fried, the same store also has it for $95, and I found another store selling it for $90. Neither of those seem unreasonably expensive to me, it's just that I'd have to hang on to a dead system for a while before I could comfortably spend that amount of money on it.

It looks like I can make the ATX power supply board fit in the case for the original power supply, interestingly enough, and while it doesn't have any screw holes that line up properly, it's just wide enough that friction from the top half of the case will hold it in place nicely. I did discover it was impossible to slide the power supply case back into the computer chassis with all those wires soldered in place, though, so I had to remove the connector from the original power supply (thank goodness for that hot air rework station I bought a while back or that would've been a nightmare to remove pin by pin) and I'll have to wire it up on a piece of perf board (which I already cut to shape so I would still have card sticking out from the sides of the power supply case to fit in the computer chassis grooves).

jmetal88
February 15th, 2015, 04:37 PM
Alright, the power supply transplant seems to have been a success. New ATX power supply board is now in the original HP power supply housing, fully modular as is the original, and powers up the machine without issue. Still no booting, indicating the rapid power cycling caused by the bad supply while I was trying to boot the machine with it actually did cause some damage.

I did check for bent pins on the backplane as suggested, but there were none. The boot failure actually happened right after a boot success. I had turned it off and tried to turn it back on again several times -- each time the power supply briefly came to life and immediately cut back out again. The next time I got it to stay on is when it failed to boot, and I hadn't touched the cards in the meantime.

jmetal88
February 15th, 2015, 06:31 PM
Well, now that the power supply is fully modded, I've put the computer back together and I'm not going to do any further troubleshooting except trying to power it up every once in a while. I had a PC motherboard once that wasn't working when I got it, but mysteriously started working after I had left it alone for some time, so I can always hope the same thing will happen here, haha.

Interesting note about the startup tone: The startup tone isn't the same every time I power it on. It changes from time to time, and sometimes sounds like two tones mixed together. I'm guessing that's the I/O card fumbling around for something to do without any CPU activity to guide it, but again that's just a guess (I really have no idea what these symptoms indicate).

saundby
February 16th, 2015, 06:08 AM
You've done some heroic work to get this 720 back to where it is now. I've seen the behavior you're describing in the past when keeping these workstations running was my job, but I can't recall the specifics for what you're getting. Logic board replacement's the best I recall, but then, I was working for HP and we'd bag up the old board to be sent back for repair rather than do the board-level repair ourselves by the time the 700 series came out.

I've still got several old 700 series around myself, as well as my favorite old 425e. I've got a 710, the sister to your 720, and a bunch of the later 700s like the 715, 725 and 735 and a Gecko. The most recent ones have a soft power-down that's one of my favorite features of those units. I've also got a B2000 that I picked up surplus (mine were all surplus units, I picked up a pallet load of old workstations from a sale at a local university once.)

I still run HP-UX on them all, porting code isn't difficult once you know how HP-UX varies from Linux or, for me back in the day, SunOS and Solaris. I've got systems running HP-UX 9.x and 10.x, I never got into 11 though my more recent systems will run it.

ClassicHasClass
February 16th, 2015, 10:55 AM
I've got a "715t" but it has an Domain/OS keyboard port in the back. I just never get around to figuring out what's in that thing, because my 9000/350 and C8000 satisfy my HP-UX jones ordinarily.

jmetal88
February 16th, 2015, 11:21 AM
Well, if anyone's willing to sell me (or even loan me) an A1094-66510 CPU board, I'd love to take you up on it, at least if you can beat the current lowest $95 price I've found so far. I got this thing booted up to the GUI twice before it failed (couldn't log in, but that's another matter) and that's just not enough to satisfy my curiosity about the machine.

jmetal88
February 16th, 2015, 04:36 PM
I decided to go ahead and take the oscillator out of the CPU board. Hot air helped me out a lot there once again, as I wasn't able to suck enough solder out of the PCB holes to get the oscillator loose on its own. Again, I don't know if I should be able to see anything on my oscilloscope since it's only a 20MHz model and the oscillator is a 100MHz model, but I hooked it up to 5V and ground and it looks like it's just putting out a solid 5V, to me. I'd expect to at least see a double line or something if it was working but my oscilloscope couldn't detect the individual transitions, but then again I don't know exactly how my scope should be reacting to a signal that far out of spec.

I still kind of want to order a new oscillator and see how it does. I can't tell from my online searching exactly what configuration of oscillator this is supposed to be, though. It seems to be a Fox F5L series oscillator, but I can only find a datasheet for one line of oscillators in that series. It does seem to suggest that this is an oscillator with two outputs rather than an output and an enable/inhibit pin, though.

EDIT: The CPU card itself seems to have Pin 1 of the oscillator not connected to anything. So I don't think I should be too particular about the configuration of oscillator as long as it'll work with Pin 1 disconnected. Pin 14 is obviously VCC and Pin 7 is obviously Ground (using the 14-DIP standard), which leaves Pin 8 as the output. Unfortunately, through-hole oscillators at 100MHz are crazy expensive (the ones I was looking at on Digikey started at around $60) so it'd be cheaper to adapt a surface-mount oscillator (those can easily be had for under $10). Now the question is, do I want a sine wave oscillator or a clock oscillator? My guess would be that it's a clock oscillator.

EDIT 2: Well, eBay has through-hole oscillators in the proper size for under $10. Maybe I could go for one of those.

EDIT 3: Hmm, the oscillator installed seems to want 5V hooked straight up to the case. I guess that's why what little info I can find on it calls it a -5V oscillator. The CPU card PCB just has the same 5V that everything else uses hooked up to pin 14, the housing pin, and GND hooked up to pin 7. So in other words, it's a -5V oscillator hooked up exactly like a normal 5V oscillator. I could probably get away with ordering a normal 5V oscillator in that case, I'd think.

bear
February 16th, 2015, 08:22 PM
You can't usually read a crystal by connecting it straight to a scope. The scope inputs have too high a capacitance for the crystal to oscillate correctly.

jmetal88
February 16th, 2015, 09:00 PM
You can't usually read a crystal by connecting it straight to a scope. The scope inputs have too high a capacitance for the crystal to oscillate correctly.

It's not a crystal, though. Well, I'm sure it's got a crystal in it, but it's one of those 4-pin modules, and I thought those were different than just a normal crystal.

paul
February 17th, 2015, 11:32 AM
I find it awfully hard to believe that the oscillator could be at fault.
Have you checked for 5V present on the CPU board?
Otherwise it does look like replacing that board is your best option since we don't have a schematic. I think you can use boards from a 725 or 735 as well (pics attached.)

gslick
February 17th, 2015, 12:10 PM
I think you can use boards from a 725 or 735 as well (pics attached.)

According to information here, you can swap the boards with 735 version boards, as long as you swap both the CPU and core I/O boards together as a matched set:
http://www.openpa.net/systems/hp-9000_720_730_750.html


The 720 and 730 share the same backplane and I/O board and can be upgraded through the exchange of the CPU board. Later HP 9000/735 workstations share a similar system setup and 720/730 CPU and I/O boards can be swapped together for 735 boards, and vice versa (as 735 I/O boards do not work with 720 CPU boards, both boards have to be exchanged).

jmetal88
February 17th, 2015, 12:55 PM
I find it awfully hard to believe that the oscillator could be at fault.
Have you checked for 5V present on the CPU board?
Otherwise it does look like replacing that board is your best option since we don't have a schematic. I think you can use boards from a 725 or 735 as well (pics attached.)

Yeah, I checked for 5V present on several chips, and it was there on all of them. It's probably not the oscillator at fault, I agree, but it's the only thing I can think to replace that's easy to get and would make a big difference if it was damaged.

And like gslick said, you can use boards from a 725 or 735 if you also swap out the I/O card.

bear
February 17th, 2015, 08:03 PM
730 or 735. 725 is a more traditional PC-style desktop box. Looks like a Vectra. Doesn't resemble the 720, 730, or 735 in any way.

jmetal88
February 17th, 2015, 08:55 PM
730 or 735. 725 is a more traditional PC-style desktop box. Looks like a Vectra. Doesn't resemble the 720, 730, or 735 in any way.

You're right, I totally missed that about the 725. Yeah, 735 is the one I was thinking of. The 730, I think you can just use the CPU card from without replacing anything else.

paul
February 19th, 2015, 12:43 PM
I think you can use boards from a 725 or 735 as well (pics attached.)
Yes, "725" is an error on my part. The first CPU pictured is from a 730 that I upgraded to a 735 including the I/O board. I was able to combine the memory from both CPU boards.

jmetal88
February 19th, 2015, 03:54 PM
Yes, "725" is an error on my part. The first CPU pictured is from a 730 that I upgraded to a 735 including the I/O board. I was able to combine the memory from both CPU boards.

Paul, do you still have the 730 card? Is it in use? If my last-ditch 'change the oscillator just because I can' effort doesn't work, I might be interested in buying it from you, depending on the price.

jmetal88
February 20th, 2015, 09:51 AM
Yeah, the new crystal was no help. Oh well, that exhausts all of my cheap options now anyway.

I did notice some interesting behavior while I was testing this time, though. I can toggle the 'service' light if I start the machine up without the I/O card installed. Does anyone know if that indicates anything in particular?

paul
February 20th, 2015, 12:46 PM
Paul, do you still have the 730 card? Sorry, no, tossed everything out that was surplus when I moved here to escape the reign of GWB.

If I, or both of us, have learned anything from this thread it's don't troubleshoot a power supply on hardware you can't easily replace!

jmetal88
February 20th, 2015, 06:31 PM
Sorry, no, tossed everything out that was surplus when I moved here to escape the reign of GWB.

If I, or both of us, have learned anything from this thread it's don't troubleshoot a power supply on hardware you can't easily replace!

Ah, that's too bad.

Well, I guess I'll just hold on to the computer until either I can afford the $95 replacement CPU card or a cheaper one comes along. I guess unless someone wants to offer me something for the chassis and monitor (this monitor's gigantic, and I don't want the computer leaving unless the monitor goes with it, really).

jmetal88
October 17th, 2015, 10:47 AM
Well guys, I went ahead and ordered a CPU card for this machine. I found a guy who was somewhat negotiable on price. I was only able to talk him down to $5 less than the $95 card I mentioned in the last post, but hey, $5 is $5. Anyway, it's supposed to be here Tuesday. Fingers are crossed that it'll end up working, but I figure there's still a good chance the I/O card could have been damaged as well, so I'll just have to see.

jmetal88
October 20th, 2015, 03:19 PM
*Sigh*

No luck. Either both are damaged, or just the I/O card was damaged and I just wasted $90 on a CPU card I didn't need.

paul
November 1st, 2015, 11:50 AM
Sorry to hear that. A risk of being in this game. I assume you've checked that the memory was installed in the right slots?

You never know what might turn up in the future so the parts might be worth keeping if you have the room.

jmetal88
November 8th, 2015, 05:12 AM
I actually went ahead and ordered an I/O card from the same guy who sold me the CPU card, yesterday. He did me a *little* bit better in price on this one, selling at $85. Originally, I was going to give up at this point, but I got in some overtime at work this week which means I can actually afford to buy another component.

And yeah, I've tried the memory in different slots to make sure. Oddly enough when I got the machine, the memory was installed starting from the highest number slot rather than the lowest, and it actually worked that way before my power supply issue.

I do have a suspected component for the I/O card failure now, though. I was examining the card and noticed that, in addition to the battery-backed CMOS, there is also some kind of configuration EEPROM. I am wondering if the rapid cycling of the power supply somehow corrupted the contents of that EEPROM in such a manner that the machine will no longer get far enough into the boot process to self-test. I plan to test this hypothesis by copying the contents of the new I/O card's ROM chips once it gets here and seeing if the EEPROMs match or if writing the new EEPROM contents to the old EEPROM might even fix the problem. Note that when I'm looking at the file inside a hex editor (I've already copied the old EEPROM), I do see a few areas of identifiable text, but they seem to be placed throughout the EEPROM's address space between a bunch of large, blank areas. It might be that that's just how the EEPROM is supposed to look (maybe it doesn't actually have to store that much and I'm barking up the wrong tree), but it does make me suspicious.

jmetal88
November 13th, 2015, 05:53 PM
Well, still nothing. I'm at a loss here. I don't want to go replacing all the RAM only to find out it's an issue with my power supply replacement, and if it is an issue with my power supply replacement, I'll probably never be able to figure out what it is without access to a working original power supply to check it against.

paul
November 14th, 2015, 03:39 AM
... my power supply replacement...
Sorry, I lost track - what are you referring to by that? Can you not verify that you have the required output voltages placed on the backplane when loaded by the boards you have? Or are you unsure what those voltages are?

jmetal88
November 15th, 2015, 07:43 AM
Sorry, I lost track - what are you referring to by that? Can you not verify that you have the required output voltages placed on the backplane when loaded by the boards you have? Or are you unsure what those voltages are?

After my power supply blew up and I couldn't fix it, I hacked in an ATX power supply. I know I have 5V, GND, 12V, -12V, -5V, and the turn-on signal in the right places, but there are a few extra traces on the power supply which I have no idea what they're supposed to do (and I wasn't able to trace them anywhere on the backplane). So basically I know all the power supply voltages are there, but I don't know if maybe there's some signal voltage I'm missing that's preventing the I/O board from initializing.

paul
November 15th, 2015, 11:46 AM
OK, I see. As far as I know there is a +/-9V as well, and the fans draw off the +9. I have no idea if anything else does, and what the -9 is for, or if it's even used. RS-232C perhaps?

Is it completely dead, no diagnostic lights on? At some point further back you had some activity with that same power supply arrangement, no?

Are the memory SIMMs installed in pairs from the slots closest to the middle, then going outwards?

jmetal88
November 15th, 2015, 07:00 PM
OK, I see. As far as I know there is a +/-9V as well, and the fans draw off the +9. I have no idea if anything else does, and what the -9 is for, or if it's even used. RS-232C perhaps?

Is it completely dead, no diagnostic lights on? At some point further back you had some activity with that same power supply arrangement, no?

Are the memory SIMMs installed in pairs from the slots closest to the middle, then going outwards?

No, it's doing the same thing it always did with this supply. ALL of the diagnostic lights are on, and that's not supposed to be a valid state. If I remove the I/O card, I can also toggle the 'Service' light, although it doesn't help anything. It was also doing this during the last few times I had the original power supply 'working', and I was hoping that building a replacement would fix it.

I'm not sure what you mean about the SIMMS. Do you mean banks 1 and 2 have to be populated first instead of 0 or 3?

paul
November 16th, 2015, 01:34 PM
I'm not sure what you mean about the SIMMS. Do you mean banks 1 and 2 have to be populated first instead of 0 or 3?
You start with the slots closest to the center of the board and work away from that in pairs. Yellow first in the photo.
I assume you have found the relevant docs on the web?

jmetal88
November 16th, 2015, 02:57 PM
You start with the slots closest to the center of the board and work away from that in pairs. Yellow first in the photo.
I assume you have found the relevant docs on the web?

My board looks NOTHING like that. All my RAM slots are on one side.

paul
November 16th, 2015, 04:30 PM
Ah, yes, my mistake. No doubt you're sure they're in the right slots.

I have to wonder if there is something like a "power good" signal is missing from the PS? My 735 light all lights on power-up as well then continues on booting.

jmetal88
November 16th, 2015, 04:34 PM
Ah, yes, my mistake. No doubt you're sure they're in the right slots.

I have to wonder if there is something like a "power good" signal is missing from the PS? My 735 light all lights on power-up as well then continues on booting.

That's what I'm wondering now as well, but if that exists I'm not sure what voltage it should be and what pin it should hook to.

As for the slots, I can't find anything to indicate where they're supposed to go. When I got the computer, it was booting with Bank 0 empty and RAM in banks 1, 2, and 3. The user manual doesn't seem to indicate they're installed in any particular order, so long as they're installed in pairs.

jmetal88
November 16th, 2015, 04:53 PM
Well, my ATX PSU board *has* a Power Good signal on it, so perhaps I can make use of that. It's hard to tell where I should hook it just based on looking at the old power supply PCB, though.

jmetal88
November 16th, 2015, 05:07 PM
IT GOES RIGHT NEXT TO THE PWR_ON SIGNAL!

Holy crap, I cannot believe I spent $175 on new system boards when the problem was that I was missing a Power Good signal. Damn it. Now I have to see if any of my old boards are actually still good and maybe I can get some money back if they are.

jmetal88
November 16th, 2015, 06:08 PM
Well, it worked for a little while, but my power supply just shut down. I don't know whether it's dead or whether it just had some kind of overheating protection kick in.

EDIT: Yeah, I think I killed the ATX supply. Oh well, it was a cheap Chinese power supply and probably couldn't handle running at its rated load. Unfortunately, all my other ATX supplies are in use, so I think I'll have to order a new one.

paul
November 17th, 2015, 01:19 PM
I think the original PS has current ratings listing on the label.

Is there no chance of repairing that unit?

I don't want to encourage you to spend more money but here's one for $199. Perhaps they will take an offer.

http://www.serverpartswarehouse.com/0950-2081-720730735-POWER-SUPPLY-NOT-FOR-735125-Refurbished-P552468.aspx

jmetal88
November 17th, 2015, 02:44 PM
I think the original PS has current ratings listing on the label.

Is there no chance of repairing that unit?

I don't want to encourage you to spend more money but here's one for $199. Perhaps they will take an offer.

http://www.serverpartswarehouse.com/0950-2081-720730735-POWER-SUPPLY-NOT-FOR-735125-Refurbished-P552468.aspx

Yeah, I just pulled another ATX supply off NewEgg for $20 that exceeds all the ratings of the original power supply except for -12V (it says 0.8A as opposed to 1.5A, but isn't it only used to get RS-232 voltages?). I would much rather hack another cheap supply to work than spend much more money on this.

By the way, I'm *pretty* sure the ATX supply I hacked up for this had preexisting issues (I mean, I pulled it out of whatever case it was originally in and replaced it for *some* reason).

jmetal88
November 17th, 2015, 05:13 PM
Took a look at the ATX power supply board this evening. I'm not sure what actually caused the issue, but it had a 15V Zener and a 6.2V Zener connecting from the 12V and 5V lines to a common point (not ground directly, but some other common point) and both of those went dead short, therefore shorting the 12V and 5V outputs together. I'm not sure if simply replacing them would solve the issue or if there's a deeper issue (I'm guessing there's a deeper issue and those diodes wouldn't have just shorted out on their own).

EDIT: Yeah, it looks like all the resistors on that part of the board have drifted out of tolerance as well, so it probably wouldn't be worth trying to fix this one (not that it matters since I had already ordered a new one anyway, but I was curious).

jmetal88
November 18th, 2015, 09:18 PM
Ha, I just found the original case from the ATX supply I had used. I was thinking it matched or exceeded the ratings from the HP supply, but apparently it didn't, so it's no wonder it failed. Specifically, the 5V rail was rated for 28 Amps instead of the 33 Amps listed on the original supply. I remember now that the reason I used it was because I just wanted to hack something in quickly and since I already had that supply, I thought *maybe* 28 Amps will be enough (my other two spare ATX supplies I had at the time were rated for far smaller currents on the 5V rail). Of course, I now realize the 33 Amps supplied by the original supply was probably barely adequate to begin with, and likely a contributing factor to the catastrophic failure of the aging capacitors on the 5V rail. The one I ordered as a replacement is supposed to be able to supply up to 38 Amps on the 5V rail, so as long as the supply is actually robust enough to get close to that, I think it should be fine.

paul
November 18th, 2015, 10:15 PM
OK, well, looking forward to the results.

I think the ATX focused more on the 3.3 rail for newer Intel/AMD processors while the Apollo is firmly in the days of 5V CPU power.

jmetal88
November 19th, 2015, 04:45 PM
Well, NewEgg's photo lied to me. There is no -5V output on this supply. I probably have a good case for getting a refund on this, but I'm tempted just to open it up and try it anyway. There is a spot on the PCB for -5V, although I tried to measure it (by sticking a wire in, since I'm not sure I want to open it yet) and only got about 0.3V so I'm not sure what extra components are needed to get that output.

jmetal88
November 19th, 2015, 04:55 PM
Actually, is -5V even used for anything besides ISA cards in these machines? I just checked the EISA GBIP card in mine and the -5V pin isn't even connected to anything, so I may not even *need* the -5V output.

jmetal88
November 19th, 2015, 07:22 PM
Okay, I decided to risk it. It seems to be working! But CRAP, it sounds like the hard drive died! What's perplexing is that it sounds like a mechanical failure -- the heads sound like they're striking something. I'm not sure how that would be the result of the old ATX supply failing.

EDIT: Oh, you know what? I do see what looks like a damaged chip on the board. I wonder if I lost a directional signal or something and the drive is trying to move its heads the wrong way?

EDIT 2: Oh good lord, I can't believe I had a compatible replacement part with the same footprint on hand from another project. Replaced it, and it's clicking normally when I power it up now. I'll have to reconnect it to the system and test now.

EDIT 3: It still boots! Couple file system errors, but it doesn't look like anything too serious, and it still gets all the way in to the GUI. Next I guess I get to try one of those security hacks I've read about to change the root password and get into the system without actually doing a reformat/reinstall. I'm curious as to what my college was using these for, and why it kept one for so long before deciding to finally throw it out.

jmetal88
November 19th, 2015, 09:44 PM
Alright, I got into the system without too much issue.

Is there a way to use a regular PC serial mouse with HP-UX? I can't find any info on setting it up.

paul
November 20th, 2015, 11:50 AM
You mean a PC mouse with the HP HIL interface ... I have seen convertors for this but am not aware of any way to hack it otherwise. If you already have a keyboard I think buying a mouse is a better option.

I'm not sure what the original issue was but it looks like there is also a 2-button version:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-46060A-HP-HIL-Mouse-/271695118774?hash=item3f424a81b6:g:8cQAAOSw2XFUf~w G

If you opt to buy one specify that the tabs must not be broken.

jmetal88
November 20th, 2015, 03:06 PM
No, I meant literally hooking up a PC serial mouse to the RS-232 port, skipping the HP-IL.

paul
November 20th, 2015, 04:05 PM
I haven't run into that option for these machines, nor any other of the unix boxes of that period. Presumably "all" it would take is to write a driver.

HoJoPo
November 20th, 2015, 05:21 PM
If you get networking up, you should be able to run an X client on your PC and connect to the Apollo, saving having to buy a mouse for it.

jmetal88
November 20th, 2015, 06:37 PM
I think I found a driver, actually. It looks like it's for a *specific* mouse, but the configuration file inside the archive is written very generically, so I'm thinking it might actually be a general-purpose driver repackaged with a brand name on it. I'm trying to see if I can get it over to the machine somehow. I think the floppy drive might be dead, although I'm going to try a few things before declaring that for sure. If I can't get that working, I'll see if I can get the file there via network.

jmetal88
November 20th, 2015, 10:58 PM
Yeah, I think the floppy drive is dead, or at least needs a re-cap. It seems like it's trying to do something, but I feel like all the sounds it's making are quieter than they should be (I can barely hear it spin up, and I can hear it try to seek a couple of times during the boot process, but when I try to access it via the terminal it seems not to seek at all). I can either re-cap it, find the same model of FD-235HF to attach to the SCSI converter, or try to do without a floppy drive, I guess. I actually tried jumpering a different model of FD-235HF in an equivalent way (basically changed from DS1 to DS0 and went from density detect to density select via input on pin 2, as well as moving a couple of soldered-on jumpers on the other side of the board to provide +5V on four pins that are normally ground) and it just didn't work at all, so I think it actually does have to be the same model with the same revision PCB and whatnot.

CORRECTION: I can hear it try to seek during the boot process when there is no disk inserted. It doesn't make any such seeking noise when a disk is inserted.

jmetal88
November 21st, 2015, 06:42 AM
Oh, I can't transfer the file over the network. :( I forgot this just has AUI and BNC network connections on the back and I don't have anything to convert those with.

HoJoPo
November 21st, 2015, 07:28 AM
AUI to 10baseT transceivers aren't too expensive, pick one up. Or an old 10baseT hub with a 10base2 connection... and two tees, two terminators and 10base2 coax cable...

jmetal88
November 21st, 2015, 10:04 AM
Yeah, I might have to do that. Still considering a re-cap of the floppy drive in here as well. I did find someone on eBay selling not the same model, but a different model using the same PCB (which it should be easier to reconfigure to what is needed for this adapter than the one I already had that I was trying to do that with), but they're the only seller that has anything close to what I need and their auction is kind of expensive for an old floppy drive.

EDIT: Good lord, I can't believe the pricing on these floppy drives *with* the SCSI adapter on eBay! They start around $400! I really hope I can either get mine working with a re-cap or by replacing the drive itself with another compatible drive.

jmetal88
November 21st, 2015, 09:38 PM
I finally got the file transferred over using the serial port and Kermit, but it doesn't seem to work with my mouse (which is odd, because this mouse works on every PC I've ever tried and other serial mice I've had have only worked on *certain* PCs for some reason). So if anyone knows of an HP-UX ver 9.x PC serial mouse driver other than the Mouse-Trak driver, let me know. Otherwise, I might have to buy an HP-HIL mouse.

jmetal88
November 22nd, 2015, 11:44 AM
Yeah, this serial driver definitely isn't helping me out. By default, it's set up to merge with an HIL device, so I thought I'd remove those lines from the configuration file to see what it did. Result? The system hangs on loading X until I unplug the serial mouse and plug it back in. The mouse still doesn't work after doing this, though. It's clearly expecting some sort of communication from the serial port before it starts, and whatever my mouse is sending in isn't what it's expecting, so it's locking up until the mouse is removed from the port. The configuration file says it's supposed to work with a Microsoft or Logitech compatible serial mouse, and I'm using a Tandy mouse that works with every Microsoft serial mouse driver I've ever thrown at it until now, so I'm not sure what the deal is. I know the serial port is functional because it's the same one I used to Kermit transfer the file over in the first place.

I did find a reference to another serial mouse driver, a "mouseman-2.1.tar.gz" by Mike Uttormark, but the original file was taken offline some time ago and there don't appear to be any valid mirrors for it anywhere.

I decided to put an offer on one of the eBay HIL mice and I'll see if it gets accepted or countered.

paul
November 22nd, 2015, 12:06 PM
Yeah, likely the easiest option in the end ... along with the AUI/TP transceiver - always useful to have on hand.

jmetal88
November 24th, 2015, 06:16 PM
I think I just saved the floppy drive! It's formatting a disk now. I replaced all 5 electrolytic capacitors on the motor board and got it to start formatting without throwing an I/O error, finally. Next I'll have to see if it'll read PC-formatted disks (I'm hoping that I didn't mess up the Track 0 position when I removed the rear board earlier). The great thing is I didn't have to order anything. I used three non-polar 22uF capacitors from another floppy drive that stopped working, apparently for a different reason since they improved the situation on this floppy drive, and I had two 10uF tantalum capacitors that were small enough to fit in place of two 10uF surface-mount electrolytic capacitors in another area of the board. The SCSI board is perfectly fine, thank goodness, and so is the interface board for the floppy drive itself.

jmetal88
November 29th, 2015, 07:41 AM
I got my mouse today. It works, but the left button doesn't register unless you push it *really* forcefully. I've requested a partial refund because I think I'll have to buy a new switch for it (I don't want to return it because I'd rather replace the switch than mail it back and wait for another one from another seller to arrive).

EDIT: Well, maybe I won't have to replace the switch. It seems to be working properly now. Not sure what changed. I went ahead and closed the return request and let the seller know why, and that I'd contact him again if the problem returned within the week (7-day return period).

jmetal88
December 5th, 2015, 01:59 PM
Well, the mouse button goes back and forth between working well and working not-so-well. The seller didn't respond to my partial refund request after a couple of days, but I decided the mouse wasn't bothering me *that* much, so I just decided to leave a neutral feedback and call it even.

jmetal88
December 5th, 2015, 06:29 PM
Okay, just bought an AUI transceiver. Coincidentally, the cheapest one I could find on eBay actually kind of matches the computer:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/191704834699

By the way, does anyone know anywhere to get software for HP-UX version 8.x or 9.x? All I can run so far is the software that came on the installation media, and the applications discs came with a lot of 'locked' software that I can't use because I don't have a hardware ID module with a matching code word (although there are a few unprotected packages on the discs that will install anyway). I've noticed I can find some software online for HP-UX 10.x, although not a lot (10.20 is supposed to be the last version that will comfortably run on my workstation). There's a whole repository for 11.x software that I've found, and while I've found some evidence that people have run 11.x on 9000/720 machines, from what I can gather it is at the very least slow, and certain patches and updates will cause it to stop working.

paul
December 6th, 2015, 12:55 PM
Sorry, don't know. I have a 2-D CAD demo program for 10.20, about 11 MB in size. 10.20 is the earliest HPUX that is Y2K-compliant. You might be able to find Fractint for the earlier OS.

jmetal88
December 6th, 2015, 06:39 PM
10.20 is the earliest HPUX that is Y2K-compliant.

Really? My 9.01 didn't have any problem accepting 2015 as a date. I mean, the interactive prompt doesn't let you enter anything outside the range of 79-99, but using the 'date' command at the shell lets you pass '15', then when you request the current time/date, the system reports a date of 2015 rather than 1915, so I had assumed it was compliant.

By the way, I think Fractint was one of the 'unprotected' programs on my Applications disc. Or at least it had some fractal generator on it. It also had a few games including one called Hextris (like Tetris but the pieces are made of hexagons and rotate six ways) and one that I can't remember the name of right now but looked like an Asteroids clone.

But I was hoping to find something like a word processor or something with at least a few more features than the standard text editor.

EDIT: Not Fractint, but a program called Mandel was included on the Applications disc. Also the one I thought was an Asteroids clone is NOT an Asteroids clone, although it does use a similar vector graphics type style. It's called XPilot. There's also a Minesweeper clone.

jmetal88
December 8th, 2015, 04:21 PM
Found some RAM that may or may not work. My best offer was accepted, so it won't hurt too much if they arrive damaged:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/252171086778

Hopefully it'll work, though, because I'm interested in trying HP-UX 10.20 and have read that I'll need more than 64MB of RAM (I have 48MB right now).

paul
December 9th, 2015, 01:51 AM
Really? My 9.01 didn't have any problem accepting 2015 as a date.

Well, my only basis for that statement was that in 1999 HP issued 10.20 as a free upgrade so all HPUX users could obtain Y2K compliance. I'm not aware of the details of how earlier versions didn't apparently comply. Certainly the hardware can handle Y2K. Hope that RAM works.
The fractal program I have is labeled xmfract-1.4-sd-10.20.depot.gz

jmetal88
December 9th, 2015, 05:47 AM
Well, my only basis for that statement was that in 1999 HP issued 10.20 as a free upgrade so all HPUX users could obtain Y2K compliance. I'm not aware of the details of how earlier versions didn't apparently comply. Certainly the hardware can handle Y2K. Hope that RAM works.
The fractal program I have is labeled xmfract-1.4-sd-10.20.depot.gz

I've read some additional info about it at this point. Apparently it'll accept a 2015 date, but it's not fully Y2K compliant. What that means, I'm not sure, but at least something it does doesn't like dates above 1999.

jmetal88
December 10th, 2015, 08:36 PM
I got networking up today. AUI to TP transciever works well, but it took me a while to figure out how to set it up (the main problem being there's a physical jumper block I had to move on the I/O card before the AUI port was even enabled). I haven't done anything with the networking yet besides pinging things, but at least I know it's working.

jmetal88
December 18th, 2015, 03:51 PM
The memory got here today. It boots up to '112MB Tested and Configured' (or something like that) so hopefully they're all okay! I haven't looked to see if there's some memory testing program I can run yet or not.

jmetal88
December 20th, 2015, 06:39 PM
Heh, well, looks like I also have to get a larger hard drive before I can try a newer OS on here. 450MB isn't much.

saundby
December 21st, 2015, 04:33 AM
Well, my only basis for that statement was that in 1999 HP issued 10.20 as a free upgrade so all HPUX users could obtain Y2K compliance. I'm not aware of the details of how earlier versions didn't apparently comply. Certainly the hardware can handle Y2K. Hope that RAM works.
The fractal program I have is labeled xmfract-1.4-sd-10.20.depot.gz

I recall version from 9.05 on as being Y2K compliant, and I never saw a problem from 9.03 on, despite the releases HP used to scare clients into upgrading. (I was at HP through Y2K, managing about 450 of out internal series 9000 systems ranging from series 300 to K's, N's and V's). I never upgraded my personal systems past 9.07, and run them to this day.

Your 920 is an interesting system, I've got one, too--it's a tank of a pizza box. I like my 735 for the soft power-down, and my B2000 likewise, but they've never replaced my 720 or my 425. :)