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JesseJH
April 14th, 2015, 11:02 AM
Hi... I want to build an early 2000's gaming machine. I'm looking for a motherboard that can preferably accept two 370 pentium III 1400MHz CPU's and has an AGP slot. It's easy for me to find one without an AGP. :/

I don't know a lot about older hardware, but I thought it would be a treat to revisit and learn about it, seeing it as though the PC I have built currently runs an i7-4790K.

Thanks :)

yuhong
April 16th, 2015, 11:36 PM
Hi... I want to build an early 2000's gaming machine. I'm looking for a motherboard that can preferably accept two 370 pentium III 1400MHz CPU's and has an AGP slot. It's easy for me to find one without an AGP. :/

I don't know a lot about older hardware, but I thought it would be a treat to revisit and learn about it, seeing it as though the PC I have built currently runs an i7-4790K.

Thanks :)

I think the VIA Apollo Pro 133T/266T chipset motherboards are your best bet.

luckybob
April 17th, 2015, 01:28 AM
Long search is OVER:

Supermicro P3TDE6-G
http://www.ebay.com/itm/151580376454

Granted that one I linked is HORRIBLY overpriced, you will want to wait for a cheaper one to come up. Expect to pay in the neighborhood of $150 for a good working one. Until then, here is the spec sheet from the manufacturer:

http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/P3/HE-SL/P3TDE6-G.cfm

edit: Also this particular forum caters to the pre-pentium era of computers. In fact, it was only recently that the general population seemed to even acknowledge their existence. That said, if your goal is gaming on period correct hardware (or via DOSbox), I'd have a visit at http://www.vogons.org/index.php (I can help at either site)

Chuck(G)
April 17th, 2015, 08:36 AM
Any particular reason that Socket 370 is preferred over Slot 1? I think the selection is probably better with the latter--and you can get the bonus of ISA slots. I use a P6DGE myself.

luckybob
April 17th, 2015, 09:02 AM
Any particular reason that Socket 370 is preferred over Slot 1? I think the selection is probably better with the latter--and you can get the bonus of ISA slots. I use a P6DGE myself.

my suggestion was based on the fact he wants tualatins. As I'm sure you know, slot one would open a pandora's box of options.

Eudimorphodon
April 17th, 2015, 09:44 AM
I have to honestly say I don't have particularly fond memories of those ServerWorks chipset motherboards. We had a few of those kicking around "back in the day" at the company I worked for; they'd served as prototypes for a product that eventually shipped on Dell servers. They may have had AGP slots but I recall them being finicky about what cards they actually worked with, and the chipset itself really was aimed at server use, just like it says on the tin.

If you're looking for a machine that gives you the best experience with 2000-ish vintage games and OS-es I'd say get an AMD Socket A machine, either the original Thunderbird (up to 1.4ghz) or Athlon XP. Neither the OSes nor the games themselves were optimized for SMP so a single fast CPU is almost always preferable.

(Edit: Before the inevitable flame war between Intel and AMD partisans breaks out note my recommendation is based *strictly* on what was pretty inarguably the best all-around choice for *gaming* hardware CIRCA 2001-ISH. Yes, things are different now, and were also different back then if games or absolute-bang-for-buck weren't your primary criteria.)

krebizfan
April 17th, 2015, 10:14 AM
The downside with some Socket A systems was a bug that prevented the usage of the integrated floppy controller which will adversely impact such a system as a "tweener." I can't find a link to the specifics of it because from what I remember there was a BIOS option on some that made it better.

Chuck(G)
April 17th, 2015, 11:18 AM
my suggestion was based on the fact he wants tualatins. As I'm sure you know, slot one would open a pandora's box of options.

I'm sure that it would be the case. Still, the server business with dual Tuallies was a mess. The Intel chipsets for them, IIRC, were all Rambus (820/840), which cuts down on the number of candidates to those using the Apollo chipset if you want to use standard PC133 RAM. Intel, at the same time, seemed to regret releasing the PIII-S chips because of the upcoming P4.

So, they're out there, but they're not plentiful, which means they'll be expensive. FWIW, I run a 1.4GHz Tuallie in a Powerleap slocket on one of my systems and I don't subjectively detect a substantial difference over a 1GHz Coppermine.

Eudimorphodon
April 17th, 2015, 12:42 PM
FWIW, I run a 1.4GHz Tuallie in a Powerleap slocket on one of my systems and I don't subjectively detect a substantial difference over a 1GHz Coppermine.

I always got the impression from the Tualatin servers that the Pentium III core just couldn't deal with 10x-plus multipliers very gracefully, IE, the SDR bus really killed it regardless of what RAM the system board used. Basically the same problem that besets the late-model G4 Macintoshes in other words. I know the Tualatin was sort of embarrassing to Intel at the time because on some benchmarks it could embarrass the higher-clocked Pentium 4 but in my real-world experience I don't think the systems ever felt faster than 2.0ghz P4-based-Xeon systems, at least.

(We had a lot of Dell PE 2550s in circulation for the longest time, which used a version of the ServerWorks chipset with integrated Rage XL video, and the machines I had alongside them were PE 2650s with their own ServerWorks chipset.)

Also note those SW chipsets have a semi-funky USB controller. If you search for info on them you'll get a lot of hits about driver problems.

GottaLottaStuff
April 17th, 2015, 08:07 PM
What are you thinking of as far as an operating system? NT? 2000? XP? I'm going to have to agree with Eudimorphodon, this will make a good server but not a good gaming system. A slot 1 PIII 1ghz system with Win 98 and a good AGP card (Voodoo 3 maybe) would work and be a lot less cash and trouble.

luckybob
April 17th, 2015, 09:58 PM
look at all these naysayers. 2 cpus are better than one. Thats all there is to it. ANY retro system is going to have some sort of caveat to its operation. Do something that makes you happy, screw everyone else.

Unknown_K
April 18th, 2015, 12:57 AM
If you like gaming on Win2k then a dual CPU would be ok, but most games of the P3 era won't use the second CPU.

Chuck(G)
April 18th, 2015, 07:33 AM
If you like gaming on Win2k then a dual CPU would be ok, but most games of the P3 era won't use the second CPU.

That's what had me puzzled. Are there any games of that era that can make use of SMP?

luckybob
April 18th, 2015, 08:37 AM
The quake 3 engine is smp aware, and by extention any game that uses Q3. Also, the 2nd cpu is always useful for taking everything becides the game onto itself. So 5hings like sound and network on cpu2 and the game on cpu1.

Becides, just having 2 is visually more impressive.

Chuck(G)
April 18th, 2015, 09:03 AM
Well, if you're willing to step back to a PPro, how about an ALR 6x6 then? Or perhaps one of the quad Xeon boards?

The more the merrier. ;)

luckybob
April 18th, 2015, 09:37 AM
Havent seen a 6x6 come up in my price range, and i have a quad and an 8-way slot 2 xeon. ^.^ in fact my home router is made from an Asus XG-DLS, a dual slot 2 motherboard.

Eudimorphodon
April 18th, 2015, 05:10 PM
Heh. I was one of those weirdos that had an Abit BP6 for a while so, yeah, I won't deny that there was a subculture in gaming that loved their SMP machines, if only for shock value. I'd just say from experience that it was fairly rare for SMP to *really* make for a better experience than a single faster CPU. The Celeron-A's in my BP6 were overclocked to 550mhz on a 100mhz bus (so that's 1.1ghz of PURE POWER, right?!) but the single 700mhz AMD Duron I bought on a lark one day for about $60 at Fry's (motherboard/CPU combo) completely kicked its rear running Half Life under Windows 2000, and the Duron actually had a slightly inferior video card.

luckybob
April 18th, 2015, 07:20 PM
Oh lord, SMP is a TOTAL waste of money. Unless you are doing ACTUAL WORK that requires it. That said, it is so much more fun.

Chuck(G)
April 18th, 2015, 07:41 PM
Yeah, I've got a dual 1GHz Coppermine Supermicro board with 2GB on it. My cheapie hacked ASUS A7N with a Socket A Athlon XP-M 2800 easily outruns it. But the Supermicro's in a rack...and has ISA slots! :)

arjoll
April 21st, 2015, 01:19 AM
Still, the server business with dual Tuallies was a mess. The Intel chipsets for them, IIRC, were all Rambus (820/840)
I installed three HP tc3100 servers at a site with PIII 1.4's, one of them dual CPU. They used PC133 (I'd have used either HP-branded or Kingston compatible). It was a long time ago though, and an HP server isn't going to help the OP with his AGP slot requirement!

This model is too old to be in the HP Product Bulletin, but I've found the install leaflet here (http://h20565.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=74369&docId=emr_na-lpn13087&docLocale=en_US) which shows two CPUs and PC133.

These were probably the last "blue" HP servers of any note I installed, everything after that would have been "red" Proliants.

Chuck(G)
April 21st, 2015, 08:00 AM
Yup, those were the RCC (Serverworks) models--and if I recall correctly, required registered PC133 DRAM.

GiGaBiTe
April 29th, 2015, 06:04 PM
Granted that one I linked is HORRIBLY overpriced, you will want to wait for a cheaper one to come up. Expect to pay in the neighborhood of $150 for a good working one. Until then, here is the spec sheet from the manufacturer:

http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/P3/HE-SL/P3TDE6-G.cfm

Here's a much cheaper alternative:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/SuperMicro-P3TDDE-dual-p3-raid-motherboard-memory-and-cpu-/281671095138?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item4194e7d362

This one is still fairly overpriced, but not to the ridiculous extent as that other listing.

I bought one of these boards waaaay back in 2003, new in box with all of the accessories. I think it was 250-300 from Microcenter and the PIII-S 1000 CPUs for it were another $100 something a piece. I upgraded it to 1400 Tualatins back in 2007 so I know it works fine with them. Just make sure to get a matched pair with the same sSpec. I think it takes PC-133 SDRAM of any type. Those VIA chipsets weren't too picky about the type of RAM they would take.

As for the AGP slot, it's a universal AGP Pro slot that should take 1/2/4x cards. I've put all sorts of AGP cards in it and never had an issue. I think the last card I had in it was a Radeon 9600.

It's been a solid board over the years. Even though it's obsolete and isn't useful for much anymore, it's survived over 10 server builds on the desk next to it and hasn't moved an inch since all of those years ago.