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Peborgh
May 7th, 2015, 02:31 AM
Who knows anything about this unit? See photo of its label.
I need to know where it was used and also how to dismantle the disk bit from the motor and electronics base. Not that I will necessarily do it...

Many thanks,

peter

24050

Peborgh
May 7th, 2015, 03:10 AM
Who knows anything about this unit? See photo of its label.
I need to know where it was used and also how to dismantle the disk bit from the motor and electronics base. Not that I will necessarily do it...

Many thanks,

peter

24050

Now with photo of the thing itself (Should have done it before!)

24051

Beerhunter
May 9th, 2015, 07:00 AM
62PC or "Piccolo" was designed at IBM British Laboratory, Hursley Park, England (62 is the IBM "code" for Hursley.) in 1979.

Piccolo was the first disk to use 8 inch platters of which it had six. (Up until Piccolo, disk platters had been 14 inches in diameter.) Initially, it could hold up to 64Megabytes of data over eleven surfaces, the twelfth was a dedicated servo surface.

Piccolo was used in IBM Mid Range Systems such as: the 8100 Distributed System, System/34, System/38 and the IBM 5520 Administrative System. It was also used in attachable Direct Access Storage Device (DASD) subsystems such as the IBM 3310 and 8801.

What else do you need to know?

BTW, the head/disk assembly (HDA) is a field replaceable Unit (FRU). That is to say, we did not take them apart in the field. Like all Winchesters, the HDA was constructed in a clean room.

Peborgh
May 9th, 2015, 07:40 AM
Piccolo was used in IBM Mid Range Systems such as: the 8100 Distributed System, System/34, System/38 and the IBM 5520 Administrative System. It was also used in attachable Direct Access Storage Device (DASD) subsystems such as the IBM 3310 and 8801.

What else do you need to know?

BTW, the head/disk assembly (HDA) is a field replaceable Unit (FRU). That is to say, we did not take them apart in the field. Like all Winchesters, the HDA was constructed in a clean room.

Does the disk enclosure come away from the base (motors, circuit boards, etc)? If so, how?

Thanks for your post.

peter

Beerhunter
May 9th, 2015, 08:56 AM
The motor and electronics cards are definitely FRUs. The HDA may come away from the casting without causing damage. I'll take look at one of our piccolos next week.

BTW, why would you want to take it to bits?

Caluser2000
May 9th, 2015, 09:32 AM
Does the disk enclosure come away from the base (motors, circuit boards, etc)? If so, how?

Thanks for your post.

peterIf you look at the picture you posted you can see the metal clips holding the see through cover in place on the seal.

Beerhunter
May 9th, 2015, 09:48 AM
If you look at the picture you posted you can see the metal clips holding the see through cover in place on the seal.
Yes, they are the clips that one should not remove outside of a clean room.

Caluser2000
May 9th, 2015, 10:13 AM
Depends on what the OP intends to do with it. The only way to dismantle the DA is to remove that cover regardless.

Beerhunter
May 9th, 2015, 11:31 AM
Depends on what the OP intends to do with it. The only way to dismantle the DA is to remove that cover regardless.
Forgive me but I spend great deal of my life trying to conserve vintage computer equipment and other technology. Working Piccolos are very thin on the ground and to you may understand my aversion to a suggestion that someone wreck what may be a working example.

Caluser2000
May 9th, 2015, 12:27 PM
That's perfectly understandable Beerhunter and one reason this forum exists.
Here's another https://www.flickr.com/photos/matthewhibberd/15380743523/ looks like they were made up until 1991 or so, having a relatively long model run.

Peborgh
May 13th, 2015, 01:54 AM
Forgive me but I spend great deal of my life trying to conserve vintage computer equipment and other technology. Working Piccolos are very thin on the ground and to you may understand my aversion to a suggestion that someone wreck what may be a working example.

Gentlemen, let me reassure you. I will not take the thing apart as it appears to be so rare. I will just mount it on a plinth of some sort.

Speaking of being a working model, I received it with all cables (power and data) chopped off. I suppose that isn't a fatal flaw and can be fixed.

peter

Beerhunter
May 13th, 2015, 06:04 AM
The cables will only become an issue when you find an adapter card, plus an 8100, System/34, System/38 or 5520 to put it in. :-)

Peborgh
May 13th, 2015, 10:54 AM
The cables will only become an issue when you find an adapter card, plus an 8100, System/34, System/38 or 5520 to put it in. :-)

Indeed. And there is no likelihood that I will get hold of one one of those!

I am sure I saw one such disk when i visited Hursley in 2013 - never though I'd get one...

Btw, I am actively looking for something IBM to buy to swap for a data Cell.

peter

HoJoPo
May 13th, 2015, 01:24 PM
Did they use this drive or something similar in a Series/1? I had one in the mid-90s (single 6 foot tall rack), but wasn't able to get it running, as I didn't have access to the required power (no electric range or dryer outlet to use in my apartment).

I did use the IBM 3151 ASCII terminal on my 386/40 Linux box....

Beerhunter
May 13th, 2015, 11:50 PM
Did they use this drive or something similar in a Series/1?
That is an extremely good question for which I am actively seeking an answer. The list that I have given above (8100, System/34, System/38 and 5520) definitely had Piccolos. Other contemporary IBM products (especial boxes from General Systems Division and low-end DPD e.g. Data Entry products) MAY have had it. I am still doing the research.

Piccolo is contemporary with Series/1 but I am not clear what disk it had. At least one example of Series/1 disk had some fixed heads and I haven't seen any Piccolos with that feature. The problem is that Series/1 was a Boca product and that lab closed ages ago. I'll see if I can find some ex-GSD CEs and ask them.

BTW, we have what looks like a prototype Piccolo that has a handwritten label saying "Lilliput". We are researching that disk as well.

mewanning
October 29th, 2015, 11:25 AM
Does the disk enclosure come away from the base (motors, circuit boards, etc)? If so, how?

Thanks for your post.

peter

I come up on this site looking a picture of even older IBM disk. During the '80 and early '90, I was an IBM Systems Engineer in the U.S with the General Systems Division (GSD). While we were part of marketing and supposed to technical support to marketing, many of us worked ever closely with the CE's (repair guys.) By the late '80, we did not have a product in the entire GSD line that did not not only have the 62PC but for most of the machines, it was the primary or only drives. Also at that time, you could not fly any Winchester type disk due to air pressure at altitude. Emergency dispatch of replacement HDAs come by passenger bus service, so inventory replacement of the HDA assembly could take several days. With so many 62PC disk in the field, it was not uncommon for the parts department to run out of replacement HDAs and force the customer to have to wait a day or so for a repair. So, being customer service oriented, we broke the rules. We had a demo System/38 in our IBM branch which had 6 - 62PC drives. Later it was upgraded to use bigger 3370 disk replacing the 62PCs. But we did not return the 2 disk in the main S/38 frame. We pulled the bus/interface cables to remove the disk from the system but left power so the disk would continue to spin and not cause any problems with the head or lubricant settling. After that, there were several times when several customers would have disk failures the same day - or a customer would take a power hit and lose multiple drives. The local CE's needed more HDAs than they had.

So we would run up to a demo floor and pull the power cable into a 62PC in our S/38. Once the HDA stopped spinning, we would remove the belt to the motor, undo the bolts (4?) and we would have a replacement HDA. The motor and the frame stayed in the cabinet. Quick trip to the customer location and had the HDA off to the on-site CE. Customer up and running much faster. Later, one the replacement part came in, the CE would do a dump/copy/restore from our used disk to the new replacement disk and everyone was now happy.

So based on that, the HDA is definitely a FRU and since I could do it, very easy to remove and replace. And, at least in the U.S., IBM sold a ton of these disk. So many that I think the IBM Rochester plant made the disk for the U.S. market. Also I don't remember much, if any, electronics in the 62PC. In those days, almost all the intelligence was in the disk controller card.

tingo
November 8th, 2015, 02:21 PM
Great story! Thanks for sharing it with us.