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View Full Version : Newark Electronics selling SCSI-2 external cables cheap US$4.65, NZ$6.45, AU$6.05



paul
June 23rd, 2015, 08:18 PM
This is the common 3-ft cable with 50-pin high-density connectors that nearly every mid-'90s workstation uses on the narrow, single-ended SCSI bus.

They must have finally figured out that they are obsolete and have over 300 in stock. The minimum order quantity is (1) on the US site and (200) on NZ and AUS. But you can phone the order in to buy just one, ask for Lily.

USA http://www.newark.com/multicomp/spc10516/computer-cable-scsi-3ft-gray/dp/19C8365

NZ http://nz.element14.com/multicomp/spc10516/computer-cable-scsi-3ft-gray/dp/4511920

AUS http://au.element14.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=15001&langId=43&productId=64648058&storeId=10184

Chuck(G)
June 23rd, 2015, 09:11 PM
Those are obsolete? How about the ones with a 50 conductor ("centronics", "blue ribbon") connector on one or both ends? Or maybe a DB-25 on one end?

Still a pretty good deal!

Unknown_K
June 23rd, 2015, 09:50 PM
SCSI is pretty much obsolete for new systems. I snap up cheap cables when I see them. Currently looking at a HD68 pin to 50 pin centronics cable on ebay for $6-7 shipped.

3' is kind of short to be honest.

3pcedev
June 24th, 2015, 01:41 AM
Qty 200 minimum order for AUS/NZ :(

paul
June 24th, 2015, 03:51 PM
Qty 200 minimum order for AUS/NZ :(

As I mentioned in my post, I've already argued the case with Element14/Newark and they have agreed to waive the MOQ for AU/NZ.

Call 1 300 361 005 and ask for Lily Blando. You cannot order on-line. Only downside is that shipping was NZ$40 for me. The parts originate from the US.

My seven UNIX machines from '92 through '97 all use narrow SCSI-2 for peripherals but the cables always seen to get lost and are easy to damage from careless insertion. I never see these listed anymore on our local auction site and I suspect they will be very difficult to secure in the future and you certainly can't fabricate one. I spent a fair bit of time searching for this part and I'm happy I was able to find them both new and cheap. If you have a need, take advantage while they are available.

paul
June 24th, 2015, 04:46 PM
... How about the ones with a 50 conductor ("centronics", "blue ribbon") connector on one or both ends? Or maybe a DB-25 on one end?

I've always admired the idealist goals of SCSI and while the huge 50-pin Centronics (SCSI-1) was really over the top (I think it was a telecom-industry connector in higher pin-counts) but the cost-cutting DB25 variations (Apple, Future Domain, some Adaptec) were technically out-of-spec (removed redundant grounds) and in my opinion degraded the SCSI "brand" by taking advantage of the conservative electrical design.
Worst yet, there was initially no agreed industry standard for the DB25 and interchanging certain devices could result in a 5V short to GND. I think also Apple's original implementation was out of spec in other ways, not sure of the details.

When SCSI-2 was released as a standard bringing in the HD50 connector, all those issues were fixed.

Chuck(G)
June 24th, 2015, 10:35 PM
When I first saw the 50 pin connector, I knew them as the standard telco office multiline (e.g. 2565 desk set) connector from the KSU or call director. Back then, they were called "blue ribbon" connectors or sometimes just "Amphenol" connectors. Connected by many yards of 25-pair cable.

I'd never known them to be called "Centronics", as Centronics were usually 34-position, not 50. (I seem to remember that Dataproducts were 50-position, but not that connector). A variation on the "Amphenol" was also used for GPIB/HPIB connectors, but with jackscrews, not retaining clips.

But I'm in complete agreement about the silliness of the DB-connector. A senseless cost-saving move. There were also some variations that used the DC-37 connector.

paul
June 28th, 2015, 03:53 PM
I'd never known them to be called "Centronics", as Centronics were usually 34-position, not 50.
There were also some variations that used the DC-37 connector.

Yes, you are correct, I just called it "Centronics" for lack of a better name. Perhaps "external SCSI-1" is preferable.
I recall the telco application of that connector as I found some in a longer shell size (perhaps 100 pins?) attached to cables while dumpster-diving as a teenager in late '60s La Jolla, CA.

The DC-37 made me think as I recall a type I'd seen on early SUN SCSI peripheral housings, but that was likely a 3-row DB50.