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vic user
November 20th, 2003, 04:34 PM
Perhaps a topic which seems lame, but it has been something I have often thought about..

I have played around with a ton of different computers and many different keyboards, and some keyboards have just felt good to use. Not just the feel, but the look, and sound of the clicking. The way the keys would respond etc... I have often wished to take one keyboard I liked and interface it with whatever computer I wanted to use.

I have changed many keyboards on many computers just to get the right combination.

I would say my three favourite keyaboards are:

1) The Macintosh MO116C
I know keyboard preference is a personal thing, but I just like the feel of this keyboard. Compact and nice 'clicking' sound :) I have it connected to my Mac SE30, where still I do most of my e-mailing from.

2) My Apple II clone keyboard.
I don't know the manufacturer, but oh what a nice keyboard. Was my first big computer, so maybe a bit of prejudice. Used on many Scott Adams adventure games!

3) Commodore 64C offwhite keyboard.
Easy to read the special characters off the side of the keys, and looks wicked inside a vic 20 box!

So, what do you like?

Chris

Super-Slasher
November 20th, 2003, 05:01 PM
I very much like the IBM clickety-type keyboards myself, from the original PC era. I only have the 84-key version for my IBM PC AT; if I had a 103-key version I'd probably be using it as my regular keyboard...

vic user
November 20th, 2003, 05:13 PM
I am glad I am not the only one who prefers one keyboard over the other :)

Erik
November 20th, 2003, 08:03 PM
There is absolutely no better keyboard then the IBM model M (PS/2) style keyboard. None. The tactile feedback, the tension of the keys and key placement are all perfect and have been since 1984.

They are solid and sturdy and they never break.

I have purchased a stockpile of about 10 of them and I use them on all of my machines whenever possible.

When I buy a new PC I toss the $2 plastic junker keyboard it comes with and slap on a Model M.

I use a VT520 terminal with a PS/2 keyboard for all of my old terminal based systems.

Erik

Terry Yager
November 21st, 2003, 02:32 AM
I recently picked up a Northgate OmniKey Ultra for only 8 bucks. Those things sell on eBay for $60.00 or more. The one I have will be a Christmas present for my girlfriend's son. He has been using an old Omnikey 101 for about the last ten years, and he swears it's the greatest thing since sliced bread. Myself, I prefer a non clickey keyboard. The ones from Compaq and Digital are my favorites.

--T

vic user
November 21st, 2003, 06:38 AM
I wonder if that is the main criteria for people then?

Clickey versus non-clickey

Chris

Erik
November 21st, 2003, 07:20 AM
I wonder if that is the main criteria for people then?

Clickey versus non-clickey

I'm not too concerned with the noise, per se, but I think that the IBM click does make the keyboard work better because of the mechanism for key contact and for making the noise.

My main criteria is the keyboard layout followed closely by the feel (key spring stiffness, tactile response, etc.) IBM designed the Selectric keyboard which defined industry standard for key placement and feel and they carried that over to their computer keyboards from the outset. The original PC keyboard was widely regarded as a masterpiece of user interface.

The vast majority of modern keyboards borrow direcly from the PS/2 keyboard layout (except for those silly broken "ergonomic" keyboards) but they feel like typing on a damp sponge.

The Northgate Omni-key keyboards mentioned above were excellent imitations and they did offer some neat features (like dual sets of function keys) but they weren't good enough to make me switch from the original, Jerry Pournelle's rantings aside.

Erik

Super-Slasher
November 21st, 2003, 09:58 AM
I'm not too concerned with the noise, per se, but I think that the IBM click does make the keyboard work better because of the mechanism for key contact and for making the noise.

With me, I prefer clickety because it's like the click of each individual key notifies my brain that I didn't miss a latter while typing; if I don't hear a complete click, it means I might not have pressed hard enough or even missed a letter.

Clickety is a safeguard, hehe. :D

Terry Yager
November 21st, 2003, 10:33 AM
Another neat feature of the OmniKey keyboards is that they allow (thru switch settings) the movement of certain keys, the ones that everybody seems to keep moving around, (/,*,\,~, etc.). They also have a switch setting that changes them from qwerty to Dvorak style key layouts, including one-handed Dvorak settings (left or right). They are rich in features, but my main complaint with them is the clicking - it drives me nutz!

--T

~llama
November 21st, 2003, 02:26 PM
There is absolutely no better keyboard then the IBM model M (PS/2) style keyboard. None. The tactile feedback, the tension of the keys and key placement are all perfect and have been since 1984.

They are solid and sturdy and they never break.

I have purchased a stockpile of about 10 of them and I use them on all of my machines whenever possible.

When I buy a new PC I toss the $2 plastic junker keyboard it comes with and slap on a Model M.


Amen, brother. I use a Model M (its born-on date is 30 Jan 88 :mrgreen:) on my main WindowsXP computer.

They use a "buckling spring" mechanism that actually depends on capacitance rather than things making contact, which makes them last loads longer. I, too, hate "mushy" keyboards; i can type faster on a Model M than a newer keyboard because of the better mechanism.

Model M's are also indestrictible. I dropped mine from a loading dock onto a parking lot, and all i had to do was pop one of the key covers back on... btw those removable key covers make it easier to switch key layouts... I've always wanted one QWERTY Model M and one in Dvorak :D

My actual PS/2's have the junk keyboards i've collected over the years, and my Macs both have AppleDesign ADB keyboards (my least favorite ADB kb).

Unknown_K
November 22nd, 2003, 06:47 AM
My favorite keyboard has to be the Nothgate Omnikey Ultra with the extra function keys, a close second would be my old Omneykey 102. I do have a gateway USB keyboard with special function keys thats ok, but any keyboards made in the last 10 year tend to suck.

Terry Yager
November 22nd, 2003, 07:32 AM
Yes, it seems that those people who own Northgate keyboards are very loyal to them. There's a whole community of OmniKey users online. A Google search should yield many hits.

--T

vic user
December 2nd, 2003, 06:03 AM
I have been poking around trying to see if I can acquire a Model M keyboard for my PS/2, and I came across this site, which seems to be selling brand new model M's (kind of).

http://www.pckeyboard.com/index.html

They are very pricey though!

Chris

Erik
December 2nd, 2003, 07:24 AM
That is pretty expensive. You can get IBM Model M keyboards on eBay in good working condition for about $20 or so every day.

I found a small stash of new ones and bought them up a couple of years ago. I still have two or three boxed and untouched keyboards stashed away along with the 4 or 5 I have in service.

Erik

vic user
December 2nd, 2003, 08:03 AM
Cool!
Hopefully there is a Canadian ebay seller with a model M.

I saw an IBM keyboard at a Valu Village on Saturday that I was going to pick up, but it had that darn Windows logo key on it.

Since my PS/2 has nothing to do whatsoever with Windows, I could not buy the keybaord and feel good. Mind you, I did consider buying the keybaord anyway, and then rubbing out the logo :)

Chris

dongfeng
December 2nd, 2003, 08:33 AM
I always love the Windows key... it's needed for so many shortcut, if I don't have it I have to do everything the long way! :lol:

I wonder if a VIC-20 commodore key would fit instead 8)

vic user
December 2nd, 2003, 08:47 AM
Hahaha!

The reason I don't want the Windows key, is just beacuse I made sure that my PS/2 was non-Windows.

I run OS/2 version 3 on it, and I formatted the entire drive to HPFS, and I like that I have this computer that is non-Windows. It has all IBM parts except for the Keytronic keyboard.

It would drive me nuts to see that symbol on the keyboard...Kind of almost saying to me "See, no matter how hard you try, you can't get away from Windows"

Not that I have anything agaist Windows... I just want Windows and Windows related stuff not on my PS/2.

Chris

vic user
December 2nd, 2003, 09:16 AM
You can get IBM Model M keyboards on eBay in good working condition for about $20 or so every day.

Yep, I just went on ebay, and there were quite a few up for grabs.

No Canadian sellers, but I did post on a local computer for sale newsgroup, and someone has already replied.

Chris

Kaptain Skitzo
December 3rd, 2003, 05:58 PM
Well, it depends really....(I'm way slow getting into this conversation though...) I like my original C=64 keyboard over the 64c/128 keyboards. I also like my A3000 keyboard over the 500(attached) style. Of my IBM Compatables, I really like the one I got with my Aptiva about 5 years ago. The arrow keys were separated from the main text keys and the numeric pad. And they had 2 extra keys with them. This made playing my favorite IBM game (Team Fortress Classic) much easier. The one that came with my Sony Vaio has the arrow keys at the bottom of the text keys on the right side. It took a bit of getting used to, but I managed.

carlsson
December 4th, 2003, 11:26 AM
I wonder if a VIC-20 commodore key would fit instead
It is rather striking how different computer manufacturers included or did not include a special key of their own:
Commodore had their C= key and later two Amiga keys
Apple has had Apple keys since the Apple II, didn't they?
Atari had an Atari key IIRC
Microsoft has now managed to put a Windows key on PC keyboards
Sun had if not Sun keys so at least meta keys with diamonds

OTOH, I'm sure there were a few major computer manufacturers who refrained from doing that but still had proprietary keyboards.

Kaptain Skitzo
December 4th, 2003, 01:05 PM
I wonder if a VIC-20 commodore key would fit instead
It is rather striking how different computer manufacturers included or did not include a special key of their own:
Commodore had their C= key and later two Amiga keys
Apple has had Apple keys since the Apple II, didn't they?
Atari had an Atari key IIRC
Microsoft has now managed to put a Windows key on PC keyboards
Sun had if not Sun keys so at least meta keys with diamonds

OTOH, I'm sure there were a few major computer manufacturers who refrained from doing that but still had proprietary keyboards.

The slightly odd thing is, the 2 Amiga keys are independant from each other. IOW- For doing a reset, you press CNTRL-AMIGA-AMIGA, but hitting CNTRL-AMIGA does nothing. Plus, some programs had special functions based on which of those you pressed.
I don't know if the WINDOZE keys are the same.

carlsson
December 4th, 2003, 11:06 PM
I'd expect it depends on how the keyboard is decoded and at what level of abstraction your software can access it. The two Windows-buttons also generate different key codes in Windows (or at least Emacs for Windows recognizes them differently), but the operating system treats them as the same key.

If Microsoft wanted, they could probably deliver a keyboard mapping where all the vowels map ta tha sama charactar, far axampla A bat an a latar varsaan af Wandaws at caald ba E. Then evere eppleceteen weeld leek sleghtle defferent dependeng en whech Wendews verseen yee hed enstelled...

Unknown_K
December 5th, 2003, 12:26 AM
The windows key performs the same function as pressing Esc+Ctrl at the same time.

carlsson
December 5th, 2003, 09:06 AM
Yes, but it generates a different key event (says my empiric Emacs studies :-).

Enough talk about Windows keys. Today I was at the post office and they had some kind of terminal to send your own e-mail by post or something (yes, the post service have developed e-mail <-> postal mail services to stay in touch with modern technologies).

This terminal had metallic flat buttons, like an ATM machine but a full-sized keyboard with a few modifications from regular layout (@ instead of Escape, $/ instead of Caps Lock). The strike length of each button is of course very short, maybe half up to one millimeter. I'm really happy I don't have to type on a such keyboard all through the day...

Unknown_K
December 5th, 2003, 09:24 AM
Yes, but it generates a different key event (says my empiric Emacs studies :-).

Enough talk about Windows keys. Today I was at the post office and they had some kind of terminal to send your own e-mail by post or something (yes, the post service have developed e-mail <-> postal mail services to stay in touch with modern technologies).

This terminal had metallic flat buttons, like an ATM machine but a full-sized keyboard with a few modifications from regular layout (@ instead of Escape, $/ instead of Caps Lock). The strike length of each button is of course very short, maybe half up to one millimeter. I'm really happy I don't have to type on a such keyboard all through the day...

Probably made that way to be easily sanitised/cleaned. I hate public keyboards during the flu season, who knows what nasty germs are on those keys.

olddataman
December 11th, 2003, 09:41 AM
As a person who was responsible forkeyboard layout and vendor selection, let me throw my tw ocentsworth in. First, the layout: One very good reason for the differences in the layout, especially in the size, shape and location of the keys around the edges, (I mean those that fal into place outside of the universal QWERTY area). it is often the case that the size amd shape of the keytops of these key is decided by the desire to come up with a layout that iwill allow a simple, preferably square cutout.That is why the Shift and Ctrl.keys, etfc are topped with keytops that are two or one and a half wide, somtimes are right angled and occupy space on two rows, etfc. As for the touch and feel of the keyboard, when I was doing the design and layout, virtually all keyboard manufacturers tried to duplicate the characteristics of those made by Honeywell Teir keyboards were made to rigid specs which described the length of the keystroke, The length of the travel to the "Make" point and the distance from the "Make"point to the bottom of the stroke, called the "Overtravel." Honeywell's real secret in the feel of the keyboard was in the manufacture of the keys themselves. They used two different plastics in the construction. the keytop was mounted on a "Plunger" which was enclosed by a tube, so that the key plunger and the tube formed two different surfaces . The bearing effect of this was to impart a smooth, consistant, quiet, fluid and smooth keystroke. All of the biggies tried to match thme, and several came very close, such as Illinois Tool Works, some Keytronics models, etc. But when the market began to base purchases on price (in quantity) alone, they all went to the dogs except a very few. At ADDS, when we first began to place orders fopr a thousand keyboards at a whack, e still paid over $!100.00 PER KEYBOARD!
But I still agree with Erik. The original IBM PC-AT. To me, the best keyboard ever was the one used on the IBM Selectric.

Ray

shirkahn
February 9th, 2004, 11:42 PM
I've got two faves-

For PC's- nothing and I mean NOTHING beats a Keytronic "Eurotech"- Much like my beloved S&W Mod 66 hand cannon- it has the perfect balance of keypressure and "soft clicky" and lets talk about durability.... I have three cats and a severe coffee/tea/jolt addiction. There isn't much that hasn't been spilled into this thing at one time or another. Its also survived several different PC's, moves, roommates, girlfriends and a few parties that got out of hand.

My other is the classic DEC LK-401. What it lacks in the small footprint category it makes up for in classic styling and functionality. Lots of configurable buttons for macros and spiffy lights add to its appeal. Well..ok...its only functional on a VAX or DEC terminal but my Vax is my computer of choice. Nothing says "Bow down before me for I am root " like a lk-401.

-Chris

TIML
March 18th, 2004, 01:45 PM
These things are important!!!

Winner keyboard of all time has to be the Space Cadet Keyboard!

You could type over 8000 different combinations!!!!

Overview here:

http://world.std.com/~jdostale/kbd/SpaceCadet1.jpeg

more info here:

http://catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/S/space-cadet-keyboard.html

Perfect for EMACS!!!

Failing that my old IBM 3270 terminal keyboard had a lovely action & sound. One that I never have reproduced on these modern plasticky things. <sigh>


.T.I.M

Classicsat
June 3rd, 2004, 07:15 PM
I have an IBM M2 (Printed circuit sheet type, with a mechanism similar to the mapacitive classic IBM keyboard)

I have a Honeywell (Digital branded), that was my daily pounder from 1997 or so until a couple of years ago when I built this system. My daily pounder is a Mitsuko.

I have a Tandy keyboard I liked for extended typing sessions (when I had a running desktop PC upstairs, have laptop now).


"system" keys:
The Apple Macintiosh keyboard has the fan kyeys, called command, and iirc, as a solid and an open one.

On a PC keyboard true, ESC-CTRL brings up the Start Menu like the Windows key, but apart from that, doesn't work like it (I use the Windows key +E to launch explorer rather often)

Kisok Keyboard:
A local big box store has a wedding registry kiosk with such a keyboard.

Space Cadet key board:
A Commodore Pet/Vic/C-64 keyboard does similar (some with actual mathematic functions that BASIC understands, EG up arrow (power) and pi (horsies in a horse race game)).

Tim Wellman
August 16th, 2004, 10:42 PM
I've used a Model M on computers I've owned since the mid 90's... and it's the same keyboard... still going strong. This is one of the later ones, dated 1993. These things are incredible... and I agree with another post, the click sound lets me know for sure I've pushed the key down when typing. This is the full sized version, I also have one of the Model M's without the numeric keypad. Another benefit is weight... a Model M won't slide across your desk like a lighter keyboard will (I usually have to use double-sided tape on the bottom of light keyboards just to keep them in place)

I recently picked up an IBM kb-9930, and though it doesn't click, I love the low profile keys (and the page back and forward buttons, and the Windows Media player controls are nice, too... and I find the mute button comes in really handy)

vic user
August 17th, 2004, 03:35 AM
i just popped around trying to look for a pic of the IBM kb-9930 you talk about, and wild to see drivers posted for it!

chris

Anonymous Coward
August 17th, 2004, 03:48 PM
I am going to have to agree that the model M keyboard is simply the best keyboard ever made. Everything else pales in comparision. You have to have the click. I find that my typing is faster and more precise. They're also indestructable, and fully servicable. I used a late 1980s, beige model M for some time, but have since switched over to a black Trackpoint II. It's slightly less noisy, and does not have a removable cable or keycaps. That's the price you have to pay to be cool though.

I also like using the 84-key AT keyboard, the A500 keyboard, and the old Macintosh extended keyboards.

Erik
August 17th, 2004, 04:08 PM
I also like using the 84-key AT keyboard, the A500 keyboard, and the old Macintosh extended keyboards.

The AT keyboard is great, but it's a bit hard to go back to after using the M for so long. Stuff is just a little out of place. . .

E

Terry Yager
August 17th, 2004, 04:25 PM
Heh! I just sold an OmniKey on eBay for fifteen bucks. The buyer paid thirty more to ship to Japan (4-6 weeks delivery time). I guess they still have a loyal userbase even after all these years.

--T

Unknown_K
August 17th, 2004, 04:29 PM
What model Omnikey? Some go for quite a bit more then $15.

Terry Yager
August 17th, 2004, 04:56 PM
It was the Ultra, the Top-Of-The-Line. I've seen 'em go fr sixty dollars and more on eBay, but I wanted to peddle it off quick, so I BIN-ed it for $14.99. Took less than an hour to sell for that price. (I had bought it for 4.00 at the Goodwill, so it was still a good profit for me -- 200%).

--T

Unknown_K
August 17th, 2004, 06:50 PM
Did you try the keyboard out before you sold it? They work real nice.

Terry Yager
August 17th, 2004, 08:46 PM
Yes, I've tried Northgate keyboards before, and I'll pass on them, even though they are built like tanks, because:
a). I hate noisy keyboards, and
2). I have a very light touch on the keys, so I have a tendancy to drop characters on a board that is not sensitive enough to register my (wimpy) key-banging.

--T

vic user
September 1st, 2004, 06:01 AM
a little off topic, but i did not want to start another thread.

does anyone know of a site or info on various keyboard layouts?

i am interested to find out why certain keyboards have keys in certain places, or mapped out differently than others etc..

like why did some have the quotes symbol with the 2 key, and others like all of them now i think, having the quotes symbol beside the return key?

it sure brings up some interesting (perhaps frustrating) times when coding on various machines.

i primarily code on a vic 20, and it has really affected my 'auto pilot' of hitting keys. i cannot tell you how many times i have hit shift 2 on keyboards, and wondering why the hell the quote did not come up, or hitting the break key all the time on my model IV, thinking it was a back space key :)

Terry Yager
September 1st, 2004, 01:04 PM
I just had a bit of a mindflash this afternoon, along those same lines. I've often wondered the same thing myself, till my ephiphony today. HINT: Compare the layout of "computer" keyboards with an ASCII chart, or write a small program to dump all the ASCII characters to your screen. Compare the output to your keyboard and you should find that all the symbols are more-or-less in order. In ASCII order the shifted number keys, 1-9 read: ! <21> " <22> # <23> $ <24> % <25> & <26> ' <27> ( <28> ) <29> or just about the same layout of older computer keyboards like your TRS-80 or my Epson PX-8. Other computers try to follow the layout of an ol' typewriter instead of following the ASCII table. This is my theory, anyways.

--T

vic user
September 1st, 2004, 06:07 PM
good insight!

it also makes sense conerning the model 100, as it differs in layout for certain symbols (like the quote) from the model IV and the like. it resembles like you say, a typewriter, and as i recall, the trs80 model 100 was a hit with journalists

i must admit that i prefer ascii keyboard layouts though :wink:

Terry Yager
September 1st, 2004, 08:16 PM
10 FOR I=33 TO 41
20 PRINT CHR$&#40;I&#41;;
30 NEXT I

YMMV...

--T

vic user
September 2nd, 2004, 04:07 AM
what does 'ymmv' stand for?

this one has got me

tachyon
September 2nd, 2004, 05:18 AM
what does 'ymmv' stand for?

this one has got me

Your Mileage May Vary. It's a standard disclaimer that says this is my experience, but you may have different results.

Tom

vic user
September 2nd, 2004, 05:52 AM
thanks, i wouldn't have got that in a life time of trying :)

okto
October 24th, 2004, 02:05 AM
hrm...vicious fight between:

1) Apple Pro Keyboard (M7803) - the one that came with post-Quicksilver PowerMacs, iMac G4s, and eMacs. i like the way it feels, nice keytravel and FLAT KEYTOPS. the 'ergonomic' keytops on PC keyboards make me type like a drunken horse.

2) Tandy M100 - Two things:
Black
CLACKETY

Jorg
October 24th, 2004, 07:01 AM
Using the same IBM model M for about ten years now. It survived 4 systems uptill now.

Exluddite
October 24th, 2004, 09:10 AM
The Moog opus 3 was pretty cool...Oh, nm.. :D

telengard
November 27th, 2004, 02:08 PM
Perhaps a topic which seems lame, but it has been something I have often thought about..

I have played around with a ton of different computers and many different keyboards, and some keyboards have just felt good to use. Not just the feel, but the look, and sound of the clicking. The way the keys would respond etc... I have often wished to take one keyboard I liked and interface it with whatever computer I wanted to use.

I have changed many keyboards on many computers just to get the right combination.

I would say my three favourite keyaboards are:

1) The Macintosh MO116C
I know keyboard preference is a personal thing, but I just like the feel of this keyboard. Compact and nice 'clicking' sound :) I have it connected to my Mac SE30, where still I do most of my e-mailing from.

2) My Apple II clone keyboard.
I don't know the manufacturer, but oh what a nice keyboard. Was my first big computer, so maybe a bit of prejudice. Used on many Scott Adams adventure games!

3) Commodore 64C offwhite keyboard.
Easy to read the special characters off the side of the keys, and looks wicked inside a vic 20 box!

So, what do you like?

Chris

I like the IBM 'clicky' type keyboards for normal computer usage. As for classic computers I think that the Atari 800 had an excellent keyboard, especially when compared to the 400. :wink:

billdeg
January 3rd, 2005, 04:09 PM
Perhaps not the best for serious work, but a favorite keyboard for me has always been the Tandy TRS 80 CoCo Model I. I like the way it feels and I can use it without looking at my fingers. I was surprised that the Commodore C116 wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.

mbarton
January 3rd, 2005, 05:27 PM
I've been looking for a keyboard for my desktop that has one of those little thumb-stick deals present on many laptops. The reason is that I'm experiencing pretty bad pain in my wrist from too much mouse-use, but I don't like alternatives that involve too much movement away from the keyboard.

I haven't had much luck finding one.

billdeg
January 3rd, 2005, 06:45 PM
yes I know how you feel. I was going to state that my real favorite keyboard is my curved ergonomic new keyboard...but I thought that was not a vintage answer :-) ...

tachyon
January 4th, 2005, 09:25 AM
I've been looking for a keyboard for my desktop that has one of those little thumb-stick deals present on many laptops. The reason is that I'm experiencing pretty bad pain in my wrist from too much mouse-use, but I don't like alternatives that involve too much movement away from the keyboard.

I haven't had much luck finding one.

They're not cheap, but you can find them.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=33965&item=6732733155&rd=1

(This is not my auction, just an example I found on eBay)

Tachyon

mwb
March 12th, 2005, 12:07 PM
I have to agree with Anonymous Coward, the IBM Trackpoint model M is probably the best keyboard I've found. I have 4 of them, 3 home and one at work. The integrated pointing device is great. no extra need for a mouse on the desk. (I tend to have a very cluttered desk) If you did want a mouse, there is an extra ps2 port on the keyboard itself to add an external mouse. All the benifits of the model M with a pointing device. Can't say enough about this keyboard....
Search ebay with 'ibm trackpoint" as the search term, then go to input devices catagory to weed out the laptops. There are almost always some up.
As an aside, my wife (she has one for home and one for work) has had several operations on her wrists and says these beat out any standard 'ergonomic' keyboards she's tried, and she's tried plenty.

Marc

Mad-Mike
March 12th, 2005, 08:21 PM
My Favorite keyboard has to be the Northgate Computer Systems Omni-Key 102, it's like the best of an XT 83 key and an IBM PS/2 Model "M" rolled into one with slightly lighter key tension and a very soft clicking sound to it. I prefer my Function keys on the sides. I use one of these on my main system.

I've had 2 IBM Model "M" keyboards, one is the beat up old relic from my old IBM PC-330 made by Lexmark, which was missing 10 keycaps, had dirt all over it in every nook and cranny to the point of grossness, the IBM logo had broken off, and it had been peed on by the cat more than a few times, and it was still working when I gave it up for free. I recently got one of the earlier "Space Saver" keyboards to replace it, and I like that ever better due to it's small size.

I have a Z-tek 108 (only 101 keys though) which is similar in feel to my Omni-Key, it's my backup keyboard.

And of course, I LOVE the original 83 key XT keyboard, I have that one hooked up to my XT clone right now, probably only second to my Omni-Key that I'm typing what you are reading on.

billdeg
March 13th, 2005, 05:22 AM
Mad Mike - I noticed that you have Compaq Deskpro listed with your signature for posts......Do you by chance have a spare 5 1/4" internal diskdrive for a Compaq Deskpro 386? My drive is on the fritz and I am trying to restore the computer to original specs. Otherwise the computer is in fine shape (internal 3.5 and harddrive OK, battery OK). I always liked this era Compaq, I used to have one in my office in the earlier 90's. Write me at billdeg at aol dot come

WayneT
March 22nd, 2005, 02:55 PM
Glad to see some more Northgate keyboard fans; I have two (an Omnikey Ultra and an Omnikey 101) that I wouldn't trade for the world.

joe sixpack
March 24th, 2005, 07:25 AM
i gotta say my fav was a cheap ass $10 AT KB called "eagle touch" made by
ortek. It had the best feel and i used it untill the keys started to break off.

for my current keyboards i really love my logitech wireless it has a great
feel and very good range aprox 15feet.

Other keyboards i like is a hewlett packard branded (asus) ps/2
and an old fujitsu AT that has the stat lights on the keys feels good but
kinda big.

another keyboard i thought was "fun" to use but felt like crap was
the ones that came with the mac plus.