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Chuck(G)
October 7th, 2015, 03:32 PM
For years, I've been using the Donegan OptiVisor magnifiers for working on equipment:

http://www.doneganoptical.com/products/optivisor

I've got a selection of sizes up to the DA-10. But, as parts get smaller and eyes get older, a simple magnifier isn't enough for me. I've got a binocular zoom inspection microscope (a B&L), as well as various other things, such as a compound monocular loupe.

My depth perception is lousy, BTW.

Can anyone suggest a decent wearable telescopic loupe that could give me more than 4x magnification and allow me to keep my nose away from my soldering iron as I'm working?

kaufen
October 8th, 2015, 01:28 AM
I use:
"SE Brand"- 10x; 17 mm lens; chrome plated, teardrop-shaped enclosure; pivot has small Phillips screws....
PRICE: lowest
QUALITY: varies;
The one I tested had surprisingly low spherical aberration. I ordered an additional 10 of these to test. Eight of them were quite good for the price, while two had weird blurring near the centers (ridiculous!!), making them just about unusable. Not bad overall- nine keepers out of 11 tested units. Who knows whether another sample lot would have the same number of keepers, though. That's the problem; the quality control is pretty much random.

kyodai
October 8th, 2015, 03:08 AM
I also have these el-cheapo loupe glasses from Hong Kong... I use them for watch repair, but i guess they'd also qualify for electronics repairs...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10X-15X-20X-25X-LED-Glasses-Jeweler-Magnifier-Watch-Repair-Magnifying-Loupe-hg-/281518387833?hash=item418bcdb279

The optical quality is quite OK for the 10x lenses, i pretty much never use the others anyways. I like that it has these LED lights since i often have poor lighting conditions in my living room.

inakito
October 8th, 2015, 03:28 AM
My tool to inspect and solder small things is a Dynascope microscope. It gives 3D viewing and increased depth, all without the discomfort of a classic binocular microscope. It is not easily portable though.

Chuck(G)
October 8th, 2015, 08:08 AM
Using a microscope (as I mentioned, I've got a good one) isn't always suitable--in particular when working with machine tools. There's nothing quite like hitting the chuck of a running drill press with your forehead or the headstock of a lathe with your nose while trying to get things just right--which is why I'm interested in the telescopic loupes.

I've seen the eBay ones, just wondering about their quality. Thanks for some guidance on that.

KC9UDX
October 8th, 2015, 08:29 AM
Those look better than the cheapies I bought. The lamp assemblies on mine point off to the sides, so it actually makes your vision worse. They only light up things you aren't looking at. To add insult to injury, the lamp units are always falling off.

Chuck(G)
October 8th, 2015, 11:37 AM
I also have these el-cheapo loupe glasses from Hong Kong... I use them for watch repair, but i guess they'd also qualify for electronics repairs...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10X-15X-20X-25X-LED-Glasses-Jeweler-Magnifier-Watch-Repair-Magnifying-Loupe-hg-/281518387833?hash=item418bcdb279

What's the working distance? If it's too small, that creates problems. A lot of these things are nothing more than simple magnifiers. I'm interested in a galilean optics loupe that will give me some distance from the object.

kyodai
October 8th, 2015, 11:56 AM
What's the working distance? If it's too small, that creates problems. A lot of these things are nothing more than simple magnifiers. I'm interested in a galilean optics loupe that will give me some distance from the object.

Well it's 10x and kinda loupe, so I am usually very close to the wristwatch, i guess around 3-4 inches is perfect. If you use the 25x optics it's really extreme, then you gotta be very close, like 2 inches or so. I think the higher the maginfication the closer you need to be to the object.

Chuck(G)
October 8th, 2015, 12:23 PM
Here's an example of what I'm talking about in a cheap telescopic loupe--like your dentist uses:

Dental loupe (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Best-Surgical-Medical-Loupe-3-5X-Optical-glass-Micromotor-handpiece-tips-Scale-/181451154665?hash=item2a3f54e4e9)

http://i.ebayimg.com/03/!Bpic)DQBWk~$(KGrHqIOKkYEuZr)OKY9BLr3s0HEMg~~_12.J PG

Note that the working distance is specified (420 mm in this case) and the large objective gives you a good field of view.

kyodai
October 8th, 2015, 11:08 PM
Here's an example of what I'm talking about in a cheap telescopic loupe--like your dentist uses:

Dental loupe (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Best-Surgical-Medical-Loupe-3-5X-Optical-glass-Micromotor-handpiece-tips-Scale-/181451154665?hash=item2a3f54e4e9)

http://i.ebayimg.com/03/!Bpic)DQBWk~$(KGrHqIOKkYEuZr)OKY9BLr3s0HEMg~~_12.J PG

Note that the working distance is specified (420 mm in this case) and the large objective gives you a good field of view.

Well yeah this one is just 3.5x - so maybe not exactly what you want.

They also have 6x versions of these, but then it gets expensive, even from China or Hong Kong...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/6x-6-0x-Dental-Surgical-Medical-Loupes-Loupe-Dentistry-Nickel-Alloy-Frame-420mm-/331168880875?hash=item4d1b3418eb

Stone
October 9th, 2015, 04:03 AM
I think the higher the maginfication the closer you need to be to the object.Absolutely... The greater the magnification the shorter the focal length.

Chuck(G)
October 9th, 2015, 08:34 AM
Absolutely... The greater the magnification the shorter the focal length.

I think you miss my point. Simple magnifiers modify the focal length of the eye's own lens. Essentially, they enable you to focus more closely. The "x" rating is a bit misleading--it simply refers to how close the average eye can focus.

This is in contrast to the galilean type magnifier above, which essentially works as a pair of close-focus opera glasses. There are also prismatic loupes which are more like a pair of binoculars, which use prisms to invert the resultant virtual image. Those are often used in microsurgery. The working distance of either type has little to do with the focal length; it's just that the focus is fixed. Alignment with the user's interpupilary distance is also quite a bit more critical. Higher magnification does mean a shallower depth of field, however.

Here's a good summary of the uses and types of surgical loupes (http://www.wpiinc.com/blog/2013/05/01/article/surgical-loupes-defining-differences/)

Stone
October 9th, 2015, 08:40 AM
I think you miss my point.No, I wasn't even addressing your point!

I was merely agreeing with kyodai's statement. :-)