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leiy
October 17th, 2015, 07:08 AM
Successfully Boot to 88-2 SIO Monitor?, dos anyone know the command??? Thanks.

The 88-2 SIO Monitor comes from MITS 88-PROM 2K board when I bought it and the 2SIO monitor is the only EPROM chip installed on the board when I bought. This is the first time I running the board.

I switch to FD00 (the chip sticker indicated), examine and hit RUN, it just prompt the symbol ">" (I expect it will show a . symbol just like turnkey monitor, but it is not happen.)

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27255

That's the front panel LED status, when I hit the RUN switch:

27256

The monitor echo any lowercase key stroke

leiy
October 17th, 2015, 07:16 AM
The monitor echo any lowercase key stroke (see picture below):

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But it not echo every uppercase keys.

When I hit A, it echo A.

When I hit D key, and several FFF, the screen reflect that:

The command in the 2SIO monitor seems very different from turnkey monitor.

27259

leiy
October 17th, 2015, 07:47 AM
This is the content starting from FD00 use the "D" command, I suppose this is belong to 2SIO monitor:

(I have 48K ram installed on this machine)


FD00 3E 55 21 FF 00 25 77 BE C2 05 FD F9 3E 03 D3 10
FD10 3E 11 D3 10 CD 7F FD 3E 3E CD F2 FD CD E3 FD FE
FD20 57 CA 44 FD FE 44 CA 55 FD FE 4A CA 7A FD FE 46
FD30 CA 00 FF FE 43 CA 00 FE C3 14 FD 00 00 00 00 00
FD40 00 00 00 00 CD 8E FD 42 4B CD 8E FD 7B 02 03 CD
FD50 6B FD C3 49 FD CD 89 FD CD 6F FD 0A CD C5 FD 21
FD60 00 FD CD A5 FD CD 6B FD C3 5B FD 79 E6 0F C0 CD
FD70 7F FD 78 CD CC FD 79 C3 CC FD CD 8E FD EB E9 3E
FD80 0D CD F2 FD 3E 0A C3 F2 FD CD 8E FD 42 4B 21 00
FD90 00 CD AC FD DA 8E FD 29 29 29 29 B5 6F CD AC FD
FDA0 D2 97 FD EB C9 03 7B 91 7A 98 D0 E9 CD E3 FD E6
FDB0 7F FE 30 D8 FE 3A DA C2 FD FE 41 D8 FE 47 3F D8
FDC0 D6 07 D6 30 C9 F5 3E 20 CD F2 FD F1 F5 1F 1F 1F
FDD0 1F CD D5 FD F1 E6 0F C6 30 FE 3A DA F2 FD C6 07
FDE0 C3 F2 FD DB 10 1F D2 E3 FD DB 11 E6 7F FE 18 CA
FDF0 00 FD F5 DB 10 E6 02 CA F3 FD F1 D3 11 C9 00 00
FE00 F3 AF D3 20 D3 21 D3 24 D3 25 D3 26 D3 22 2F D3
FE10 23 D3 27 3E 0C D3 24 3E 2C D3 20 D3 22 D3 26 3E
FE20 03 D3 27 D3 10 3E 11 D3 10 21 FF FF 23 7E 47 2F
FE30 77 BE 70 CA 2C FE AF BD C2 C1 FE 01 F2 FF 09 F9
FE40 09 E5 DB FF E6 0F FE 07 F2 D7 FE 21 EB FE 04 4F
FE50 87 81 4F 09 D1 01 F1 C9 C5 01 80 47 C5 06 F5 4E
FE60 79 C5 06 DB 4A C5 43 23 4E C5 23 46 0E E6 C5 3D
FE70 47 0E DB C5 EB 3E 04 D3 27 CD A5 FE CD A5 FE 4F
FE80 CD A5 FE B9 CA 80 FE 0D CD A5 FE 0D C2 88 FE CD
FE90 A5 FE FE 3C CA A6 FE FE 78 C2 8F FE CD A5 FE 4F
FEA0 CD A5 FE 69 67 E9 CD A5 FE 4F 06 00 CD A5 FE 5F
FEB0 CD A5 FE 57 7A BC 3E 4F CA D9 FE CD A5 FE EB 77
FEC0 BE 3E 4D C2 D9 FE 23 EB 0D C2 B4 FE 48 CD A5 FE
FED0 B9 CA 8F FE 3E 43 01 3E 49 32 00 00 22 01 00 FB
FEE0 D3 01 D3 11 D3 05 D3 23 C3 E0 FE 11 CA 01 11 CA
FEF0 01 01 C2 01 07 C2 01 21 CA 80 05 CA 02 25 CA 40
FF00 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
FF10 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF

leiy
October 17th, 2015, 07:57 AM
This is the prom board:

27260

27261

JNZ
October 17th, 2015, 10:57 AM
Hey leiy

I looked into this, starting with the MITS 88-PMC PROM card. Here's the documentation for it: https://manx.classiccmp.org/details.php/39,17651.

Although the A15-A11 switches seem the opposite of what I'd expect (I read it as all 0s, but it only makes sense as all 1s), I think you're right in that it's addressing that PROM at FD00. Each PROM only gives you 256 bytes (!) to play with, so it should be FD00-FDFF.

I disassembled the memory you provided, but it doesn't make sense to me. I don't see any IN or OUT calls anywhere, which is the only way I could see writing or reading from an input port. What other cards do you have in the machine? Maybe the PROM is accessing the card in some other way. Clearly it's outputting data and receiving commands.

Here's the disassembly: http://pastebin.com/4eSJnNnd

I also don't understand how 256 bytes in memory can be disassembled to more than that. I found a 256 B turnkey monitor online, and it disassembles into similar code, so maybe it's okay.

Have you tried treating this ROM like the TURNKEY monitor? The D command works, maybe M and J do too?

http://altairclone.com/downloads/manuals/TURMON%20PROM%20Manual.pdf

From what you posted above, though, it looks to me like you're successfully interacting with the monitor contained in that PROM.

deramp5113
October 17th, 2015, 07:47 PM
Looks like a home-spun monitor. It is not the original octal Turnkey monitor and it is not the hex Turnkey monitor that came with Altair hard disk systems.

I looked at the code and played with it on my Altair Clone. Here is what I found:

Commands are single letters and must be in upper case. Everything typed is echoed, and if not a valid command, the ">" prompt is displayed again. Hence, typing lower case letters (all invalid commands), echoes the typed character and the prompt is re-displayed.

All numbers are in hex. Leading zeros are not required. CTRL-X terminates command entry and returns to the ">" prompt.

Commands:

W addr byte byte byte byte ... byte ctrl-x (Write bytes to memory starting at addr until ctrl-x typed)
D addr1 addr2 (Dump memory from addr1 to addr2)
J addr (Jump to addr and execute)
F (boot from Floppy - jumps to FF00 so DBL ROM must be in place)
C (boot from Cassette - jumps to FE00 so MBL ROM must be in place)

Mike

leiy
October 17th, 2015, 11:48 PM
Hey leiy

I looked into this, starting with the MITS 88-PMC PROM card. Here's the documentation for it: https://manx.classiccmp.org/details.php/39,17651.

Although the A15-A11 switches seem the opposite of what I'd expect (I read it as all 0s, but it only makes sense as all 1s), I think you're right in that it's addressing that PROM at FD00. Each PROM only gives you 256 bytes (!) to play with, so it should be FD00-FDFF.

I disassembled the memory you provided, but it doesn't make sense to me. I don't see any IN or OUT calls anywhere, which is the only way I could see writing or reading from an input port. What other cards do you have in the machine? Maybe the PROM is accessing the card in some other way. Clearly it's outputting data and receiving commands.

Here's the disassembly: http://pastebin.com/4eSJnNnd

I also don't understand how 256 bytes in memory can be disassembled to more than that. I found a 256 B turnkey monitor online, and it disassembles into similar code, so maybe it's okay.

Have you tried treating this ROM like the TURNKEY monitor? The D command works, maybe M and J do too?

http://altairclone.com/downloads/manuals/TURMON%20PROM%20Manual.pdf

From what you posted above, though, it looks to me like you're successfully interacting with the monitor contained in that PROM.

Thank you. I use SSM 4IO to simulate 88-2 SIO board.

The J in this monitor is a JUMP command.

This is my board configration, from top to bottom: MITS 88-2K PROM, Micro digital systems 16K SRAM, Solid state music 4IO board, MITS 88 cpu board.

27272

leiy
October 17th, 2015, 11:49 PM
Looks like a home-spun monitor. It is not the original octal Turnkey monitor and it is not the hex Turnkey monitor that came with Altair hard disk systems.

I looked at the code and played with it on my Altair Clone. Here is what I found:

Commands are single letters and must be in upper case. Everything typed is echoed, and if not a valid command, the ">" prompt is displayed again. Hence, typing lower case letters (all invalid commands), echoes the typed character and the prompt is re-displayed.

All numbers are in hex. Leading zeros are not required. CTRL-X terminates command entry and returns to the ">" prompt.

Commands:

W addr byte byte byte byte ... byte ctrl-x (Write bytes to memory starting at addr until ctrl-x typed)
D addr1 addr2 (Dump memory from addr1 to addr2)
J addr (Jump to addr and execute)
F (boot from Floppy - jumps to FF00 so DBL ROM must be in place)
C (boot from Cassette - jumps to FE00 so MBL ROM must be in place)

Mike

Thank you. The W command is cool!

I've use the monitor to load 4K basic now!

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Success!

Running loops! This is the first time Altair 8800 SN221876K running Basic since I received the package. And I'm sure that is the 1st time the Altair 8800 running Basic from year 1975! Because it is a stock Altair only with 1K RAM and CPU board inside! See these link: http://www.vintage-computer.net/?p=67 (the 4PIO board is my later plugin....)

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