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Timo W.
June 4th, 2016, 12:31 AM
Got this nice RAM card lately. Unfortunately, I've got no further information about it. Anyone knows what card this is, and what the dip switch settings are?

31490 31491 31492

g4ugm
June 4th, 2016, 01:09 AM
Is there an FCC ID on the back? Those can help identify manufacturers...

Timo W.
June 4th, 2016, 01:12 AM
No, what you see on the second picture is the only imprint on the card. No FCC ID whatsoever.

Timo W.
November 5th, 2016, 09:00 AM
Still looking for infos about the card.

1ST1
November 5th, 2016, 01:33 PM
Populate all sockets with 256kB+Parity SIMMs, insert it in an 386 AT and look what happens.

Timo W.
November 12th, 2016, 11:48 AM
Apart from the fact that this card is going to be used in an 286, it won't magically work in an 386 without a driver. These cards require specifying the address of the memory window, the page size etc. Correct driver and jumper settings are mandatory.

krebizfan
November 12th, 2016, 12:08 PM
Many AT extended/EMS cards especially with SIMMs had internal BIOSes and would provide information on bootup. Plug it in and there is a good chance that it will tell you who made it which could lead to figuring out which drivers would work with it. If you are very lucky, it was setup for extended memory use and will automatically add some memory at the highest addresses.

Chuck(G)
November 12th, 2016, 12:10 PM
This looks to me like a simple extended memory card (i.e. not LIM/EMS). It's even identified in an eBay auction as such, so no driver. The switches probably determine the base address and the SIMM size.

gslick
November 12th, 2016, 12:12 PM
It does have IO Port switches. Don't know why a simple extended memory card would need an IO Port.

Timo W.
November 12th, 2016, 12:21 PM
There's no BIOS on the card, which can be seen from the pictures. And yes, it's ought to be an EMS card.

Chuck(G)
November 12th, 2016, 12:21 PM
It does have IO Port switches. Don't know why a simple extended memory card would need an IO Port.

I missed that--perhaps a simple LIM 3.2 card then? It can't be all that complicated, given what's on the board. I wonder if the the Intel "alternate" EMS driver would do the trick.

Chuck(G)
November 12th, 2016, 12:28 PM
Why would it necessarily have a BIOS? And the switches would seem to indicate that it can function as either XMS or EMS (which wasn't uncommon).

I'm just guessing here, obviously.

Timo W.
November 12th, 2016, 12:41 PM
Why would it necessarily have a BIOS?
See krebizfan's earlier post. ;)

I already tried alternate EMS drivers, but they require parameters such as page frame address, i/o port, number of handles, first page number, etc. Without knowing what the jumpers on the card do, there's no way to get it running.


And the switches would seem to indicate that it can function as either XMS or EMS (which wasn't uncommon).
Possible, but then we have three dip switches just for choosing XMS or EMS...

Chuck(G)
November 12th, 2016, 01:01 PM
Few LIM boards used BIOSes (not even Intel's Aboveboard 286), though several did keep settings in a small NVRAM (EEPROM).

I suspect that one of the three XMS/EMS switches disables the I/O port decoding for XMS.

It's unlikely that you'll find information on an unbranded board, but I suspect there's some hope. You might take a look at some known boards, such as the AT Rambank (http://www.minuszerodegrees.net/manuals/AT-RAMBANK%20Users%20Manual.pdf) to get some ideas. I/O ports can usually be probed for.

Again, just blind guesses.