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new_castle_j
July 1st, 2016, 08:56 PM
This board was made by Charter Information Corp, called the Poppy II. It appears to be rather complete implementation of the IBM-PC (including 4 graphics modes) on a single S-100 board. It would be fun to play with these boards as I have all the software associated with them (including a boot image that it can use to run Microsoft Flight Simulator), however, I do not have the external Terminal Adapter box or cables that the manual discusses which allows you to hook up a standard IBM PC keyboard and monitor.

What are the chances that a way can be made to figure out how to connect a keyboard and monitor? Anyone out there have the smarts and interest to try?

I wish I could post the whole manual, but here's a snippet:

The Terminal Adapter (TA) resides on the outboard end of the
TA external cable. It has connectors for the TA external cable,
monitor, keyboard, and remote serial port. The TA contains the
speaker and active electronics that demultiplex the signals from
the TA cable, conditioning them for the keyboard, speaker,
monitor and (optionally) the serial port.

_____________

Here's an article announcing the release of this board:

https://books.google.com/books?id=mTwEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA33&lpg=PA33&dq=charter+information+corp+austin+tx&source=bl&ots=5AxuWJJNNz&sig=DDJHOnmxaxY4Q35Dfn9fzv5lk0w&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilw_zvn5vNAhVDa1IKHR_GCy4Q6AEIVDAH#v=on epage&q=charter%20information%20corp%20austin%20tx&f=false

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inotarobot
July 2nd, 2016, 01:24 AM
This board was made by Charter Information Corp, called the Poppy II. It appears to be rather complete implementation of the IBM-PC (including 4 graphics modes) on a single S-100 board. It would be fun to play with these boards as I have all the software associated with them (including a boot image that it can use to run Microsoft Flight Simulator), however, I do not have the external Terminal Adapter box or cables that the manual discusses which allows you to hook up a standard IBM PC keyboard and monitor.

What are the chances that a way can be made to figure out how to connect a keyboard and monitor? Anyone out there have the smarts and interest to try?

I wish I could post the whole manual, but here's a snippet:

The Terminal Adapter (TA) resides on the outboard end of the
TA external cable. It has connectors for the TA external cable,
monitor, keyboard, and remote serial port. The TA contains the
speaker and active electronics that demultiplex the signals from
the TA cable, conditioning them for the keyboard, speaker,
monitor and (optionally) the serial port.

_____________

Here's an article announcing the release of this board:

https://books.google.com/books?id=mTwEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA33&lpg=PA33&dq=charter+information+corp+austin+tx&source=bl&ots=5AxuWJJNNz&sig=DDJHOnmxaxY4Q35Dfn9fzv5lk0w&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilw_zvn5vNAhVDa1IKHR_GCy4Q6AEIVDAH#v=on epage&q=charter%20information%20corp%20austin%20tx&f=false

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Found the Poppy II manual on
http://bitsavers.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de/pdf/charterInformationCorp/Poppy_II_Manual_1987l.pdf

Simple cut of info

The Terminal Adapter (TA) resides on the outboard end of the
TA external cable. It has connectors for the TA external cable,
monitor, keyboard, and remote serial port. The TA contains the
speaker and active electronics that demultiplex the signals from
the TA cable, conditioning them for the keyboard, speaker,
monitor and (optionally) the serial port.

TA EXTERNAL
The external TA cable is made up of individually shielded pairs.
The number of pairs required is dependent upon the type of
monitor as follows:
Monochrome 5
EGA Color 9
Caution: Do not use a monitor without a matching cable; the
results are likely to be disastrous, including harm to the
processor board and the monitor.
There is a male DB25 connector on the inboard end. This
connector has an internal jumper that tells the processor board
whether the monitor is monochrome, color, Of EGA.

I think its mainly this DB25 on the inboard ends ''INTERNAL Jumper" that could be the issue getting information on.

Also as you say there seems NO information on the Din 5 Connector for keyboard/

This mates with the panel mounted outboard connector of the internal TA cable.
The outboard end terminates in a male DB25 connector which
mates with a female DB25 on the TA. The TA may be up to
200 feet from the processor board. In addition to the connector
for the external TA cable, the TA has four other connectors:
l. A direct wire connection to a wall plug type transformer
that provides power.
2. A female DIN 5 circular connector for the keyboard cable.
3. A female DB9 connector for the monitor cable.
4. A male DB25 connector for the remote serial port.

SERIAL PORT INTERNAL
The serial port internal cable delivers signals to a connector on
the case. These signals are identical in function to those
provided by the PC serial port. Poppyll avoids a paddle board
by providing the proper serial pon voltage levels on the
processor board.
The cable is a 30", 20 conductor ribbon cable. The inboard
end has a 20 pin female header connector that mates with a 20
pin beader on the processor board at location J3. The outboard
end has a panel mount transition connector providing a male
DB25 connector for the external cable.
Note that this connector and its associated internal cable are
utilized only if the serial port is to be local to the system case
rather than accessible on the TA.

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inotarobot
July 2nd, 2016, 02:04 AM
Seeing from the following information I posted and that you initially posed same,

the core words are "active electronics that demultiplex the signal". Trying to get an understanding of these is going to take time.


The Terminal Adapter (TA) resides on the outboard end of the
TA external cable. It has connectors for the TA external cable,
monitor, keyboard, and remote serial port. The TA contains the
speaker and active electronics that demultiplex the signals from
the TA cable, conditioning them for the keyboard, speaker,
monitor and (optionally) the serial port.

new_castle_j
July 2nd, 2016, 05:59 AM
Found the Poppy II manual on
http://bitsavers.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de/pdf/charterInformationCorp/Poppy_II_Manual_1987l.pdf


Awesome, I'm the one who submitted the manual to bitsavers, but I didn't know it was available yet.

Thanks for detailing all those snippets from the manual and providing a much more complete explanation of the challenge!

new_castle_j
August 18th, 2016, 06:26 PM
I'm attaching a picture of this IBM-PC on an S-100 board AKA Poppy board. I was able to find the original software programmer for this board and have a conversation about what he remembers. This board exists because the folks who created it thought it would be a fun thing to do. They knew they had it right the day that they could run Flight Simulator on it. Flight Simulator did not talk to the hardware through the OS, but instead sent commands directly to the on board devices. It didn't sell particularly well since everyone just wanted IBM-PC's, but it is a fine example of engineering, especially considering it's EGA graphics capability.

Looking at this board, I wonder if anyone can take an educated guess as to what goes in the missing socket at the top labeled U60. The manual doesn't say what chip belongs in that socket, but when the IC is present, it activates the serial connector locally on the board. The other option is to remove the IC from the board and install it onto an adapter board that can be up to 200 ft away connected by an external cable. The idea was that if the IC was present on the board, you could attach a peripheral such as a modem right next to your S-100 chassis. Otherwise, you could transfer the IC onto the aforementioned adapter board and have the serial port located right next to your screen and keyboard where it's handy to plug in a mouse.

Here's the snippet from the manual describing the setup:

The serial port internal cable delivers signals to a connector on
the case. These signals are identical in function to those
provided by the PC serial port. Poppyll avoids a paddle board
by providing the proper serial port voltage levels on the
processor board.
The cable is a 30", 20 conductor ribbon cable. The inboard
end has a 20 pin female header connector that mates with a 20
pin beader on the processor board at location J3. The outboard
end has a panel mount transition connector providing a male
DB25 connector for the external cable.
Note that this connector and its associated internal cable are
utilized only if the serial port is to be local to the system case
rather than accessible on the Terminal Adapter.

Since I do not have the remote Terminal Adapter board that corresponds with this, I would like to enable the serial port locally. Anyone have a guess as to what I/C goes there? This board is circa 1987.

Thank You!

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Chuck(G)
August 18th, 2016, 10:41 PM
Judging from the number of other PALs on the board, probably a GAL or PAL. 24-pin 0.300 DIPs weren't common commodity TTL packages, but, say, a 22V10 would fit the description.