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NeXT
January 30th, 2017, 06:44 PM
I was roaming around the property of a former hoarder whose estate was in the process of being cleared and sold and I found this in one of the many outbuildings the man had built over the years to hold his stuff.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/ballsandy/Computer%20related/IMG_6938.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/ballsandy/Computer%20related/IMG_6941.jpg

It's a rather heavy metal box with some sort of electromechanical assembly that using solenoids would release clutches and punch holes in 1" paper as it travelled through the block above using a mechanism on on this piece. There are no identifying marks anywhere on it. It is still quite oily which saved the pins from seizing and in the photo above you can see some of the light oil I fed down the pin channels to help clean them out.

It's a modular component but it doesn't look like a punch assembly I've seen on a teletype much less a Flexowriter but the 8-hole arrangement makes me think it was not likely used with a Telex service. Any ideas?

1944GPW
January 30th, 2017, 08:37 PM
I can't tell you anything about the punch, but I can see it has a Winchester MRAC14P connector. These were (and still are?) used in military and avionics equipment.
I can also say, these connectors can be a real pain for the uninitiated to source the right ones, as I am doing for my Diablo 31 (RK03) drives (which uses MRAC42S, MRAC42P and MRAC14S).
The problem? Too MUCH choice in configuration options. Apart from, obviously, the number of connections you can decide on the pin/socket diameter, the pin material, do you want gold plated or brass, crimp or solder tag, jack screws of multiple types (and metals), backshells of different sorts, available with or without different restrainers. There's also MRE which is very close to MRAC. A lot of the MRACs for sale are the empty housings, you then go through the configuration smorgasbord.
And, you need a special tool to remove the pin from the housing, and a different one to put it back (although I believe that can be done without the special tool). I am machining a removal tool for my MRACs as I finally got the one I needed from an aircraft wreckers on eBay, only to find it has the slightly smaller diameter sockets than the ones I require (did not think to check with the seller). Going to attempt to remove and drill them out carefully.
These connectors are wonderful, rugged, dependable connectors as you would expect, but not so easy to deal with when as a hobbyist you don't know exactly what you need :confused:

g4ugm
January 30th, 2017, 11:18 PM
I was roaming around the property of a former hoarder whose estate was in the process of being cleared and sold and I found this in one of the many outbuildings the man had built over the years to hold his stuff.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/ballsandy/Computer%20related/IMG_6938.jpg
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/ballsandy/Computer%20related/IMG_6941.jpg

It's a rather heavy metal box with some sort of electromechanical assembly that using solenoids would release clutches and punch holes in 1" paper as it travelled through the block above using a mechanism on on this piece. There are no identifying marks anywhere on it. It is still quite oily which saved the pins from seizing and in the photo above you can see some of the light oil I fed down the pin channels to help clean them out.

It's a modular component but it doesn't look like a punch assembly I've seen on a teletype much less a Flexowriter but the 8-hole arrangement makes me think it was not likely used with a Telex service. Any ideas?

Paper Tape was widely used by computerised manufacturing (CNC) equipment. When I was at "University" (Newcastle upon Tyne Polytechnic, now "Northumbrian University" ) we had a paper tape punch and reader on our IBM1130 specifically for producing CNC tapes. You may as why a reader, well I gather this was used so CNC tapes could be read and the tool actions modelled to check for example, that you were not trying to mill holes in the bed of the milling machine.

I suspect it may be from this part of industry..

KC9UDX
January 31st, 2017, 02:25 AM
Yep. I've seen so many disused punches and readers from CNC equipment that I don't even know how many are similar.

NeXT
January 31st, 2017, 05:48 AM
I'm aware there's a million varieties out there but I'm curious if someone here can identify it before I go and see what greenkeys has to say.