PDA

View Full Version : Vintage Computer Price Guide



djkrex
December 26th, 2003, 04:14 PM
For the past few years, I've been hoping someone would publish a vintage computer price guide. I know that there are price guides for used computers but, when the price falls below $1.00, it falls off the list. I remember seeing the IBM PC being listed at the bottom.
How about the Vintage computer forum comming up with one? All the members could contribute. The guide could have photo's, average Ebay selling price, etc. Members could submit pictures of there machines, vote on the best candidate for the guide and help establish the market value.
Members having their machines in the guide could have their name in the credits (optional).
Most of the info on vintage computers is scattered all over the net in museums and documents. How about putting it all together in one spot.
Who knows, this might draw some more people to the forum.
Don't beat me up too bad about this. It was just a thought. :?

Erik
December 26th, 2003, 06:53 PM
It's definitely a good thought, but I'm not sure how something like that could be kept current without a lot of effort.

I maintain an Excel spreadsheet of Altair and IMSAI sales on eBay. I've probably got over 75% of those machines sold over the last 18 months or so recorded with price, date and a basic description (since completeness and condition matter.)

To do that for the hundreds of makes and models that people collect would be very, very time consuming.

Michael Nadeau has a nice book (I have a copy) that covers about 700 machines. His prices are more on the collector side then the eBay side (i.e. they are cheaper then eBay prices, but they are valuable. Check out his site at http://www.classictechpub.com/collectmicros.htm.

If you do want to start an effort like that I think we'd have to plan it and get some folks committed to keeping track of prices for certain machines or categories. . .

Erik

Super-Slasher
December 26th, 2003, 07:10 PM
1986 IBM PC AT at a garage sale... $10.
Second hand parts for the PC AT... $75.
Restoring a vintage computer... priceless.

Heehee, though there are alot of people who would argue the validity of the third scentence, including my family. Ugh.

The idea is a very good one, but like Erik has said, it would be very hard to maintain and such, even though I could only see it having to be updated every 6 months or so - prices don't change that often for something so old.

CP/M User
December 26th, 2003, 08:06 PM
"djkrex" wrote:

> For the past few years, I've been hoping
> someone would publish a vintage computer
> price guide. I know that there are price
> guides for used computers but, when the
> price falls below $1.00, it falls off the list.
> I remember seeing the IBM PC being listed
> at the bottom.

Personally, I feel that vintage computers are
hard to put a value on because they could be
any darn thing based on the purchaser. So
when you take a computer into some store
which sells second hand goods, then you're
less likely to get a value for, compared to
if you go to ebay & sell it there.

> How about the Vintage computer forum
> comming up with one? All the members
> could contribute. The guide could have
> photo's, average Ebay selling price, etc.
> Members could submit pictures of there
> machines, vote on the best candidate for
> the guide and help establish the market value.
> Members having their machines in the guide
> could have their name in the credits (optional).
> Most of the info on vintage computers is
> scattered all over the net in museums and
> documents. How about putting it all together
> in one spot.

If it's scattered about the net with no links or
perhaps no ring, then I'd agree, unless there's
a group listing of these sites done in Google
Directory. But you seem to be making it sound
like there's bits & blobs scattered all over the
place! ;-)

> Who knows, this might draw some more people
> to the forum.
> Don't beat me up too bad about this. It was
> just a thought. :?

It may not necessary be bad idea, but I just feel
that a vintage computer price list is quite tricky
task for anyone. For example, what's a real value
on a Jupiter Ace? A system as rare as that might
have the asking price of $1,000, but then some
may pay that. But how much would it really be
worth?

Cheers,
CP/M User.

vic user
December 27th, 2003, 03:54 AM
I like the idea a lot.

Perhaps it can start small, and then more computers added to the list as time goes on.

I also like Erik's spreadsheet thing keeping track of Altairs over ebay, and stuff.

If each person could do one computer like that, and then periodically update it and post the information to the group, then perhaps the work will be divided amongst many.

My first choice for helping in computer updating would be the Commodore vic 20, but I would be glad to do any price checking on ebay etc. for another computer.

Chris

p.s. would be nice to use vintage software for the info too!

Terry Yager
December 27th, 2003, 10:19 AM
The problem with the spreadsheet tracking eBay sales is that some of the most interesting machines *never* show up on eBay. Some of my favorite machines are so rare that it is nearly impossible to sell them, because nobody knows enough about them to really appreciate thier value. A few that come to mind are the Dimension 68000, the Sanyo 775, the VT Commuter Computer, the Compaq Portable 286, and mebbe a few others. It's hard to put a value on these machines if you don't see them being sold on a regular basis. I have a VT Commuter for sale elswhere on this msg. board for only $50.00 and haven't even had any inquiries on it. Most people don't even realize what a milestone in portable computing that p'ticular machine represents. It was the first IBM-PC compatible that used an LCD display. I figger it oughta be worth something to another collector, but mebbe it's just too rare. Another example is the Compaq Portable 286. Very few of these were even made...they're very rare. How much is it worth? I don't know, I've never seen or heard of another one besides the one I own.

--T

CP/M User
December 27th, 2003, 12:10 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> The problem with the spreadsheet tracking eBay
> sales is that some of the most interesting
> machines *never* show up on eBay.

That's true! :-)

> Some of my favorite machines are so rare that
> it is nearly impossible to sell them, because
> nobody knows enough about them to really
> appreciate thier value. A few that come to mind
> are the Dimension 68000, the Sanyo 775, the VT
> Commuter Computer, the Compaq Portable 286,
> and mebbe a few others. It's hard to put a value
> on these machines if you don't see them being sold
> on a regular basis.

I think I know of the Compaq Portable 286, which has
that keyboard which can be seperated from the main
body, I think?

I've got a Sanyo IBM compatable 386 notebook (if you
can call it that), which while is from the same period,
doesn't have that split keyboard (which is a shame).
Also a couple of years back I got some memory for it,
but finding the memory was extremely tricky,
eventually I brought it online (overseas) which worked
out just a bit under $200 US for 4Mb's (the machines
compacity), though the memory was very unique &
specific.

Don't think I'm familiar with the Sanyo 775, but I know
of the Sanyo 555 which you could say is a 16bit
computer (8086 processor) but isn't IBM compatable
as it more of a home computer.

> I have a VT Commuter for sale elswhere on this
> msg. board for only $50.00 and haven't even
> had any inquiries on it.

I keep forgetting to check the specs of some of
these computers, unfortunately I don't think I'll
have any room for a VT computer.

> Most people don't even realize what a milestone
> in portable computing that p'ticular machine
> represents. It was the first IBM-PC compatible
> that used an LCD display. I figger it oughta be
> worth something to another collector, but mebbe
> it's just too rare.

Yes, it sounds interesting enough, I think though
it's a bit of a pity, that perhaps people are
marking it for being an IBM compatable, though
I would have thought there were some IBM
collectors.

> Another example is the Compaq Portable 286.
> Very few of these were even made...they're very
> rare. How much is it worth? I don't know, I've
> never seen or heard of another one besides the
> one I own.

Seems strange that it's a rare machine, as I think I
have a couple of books (from around 1989) which
have this machine in it. The Compaq Portable I'm
thinking of was a 286 & had this keyboard which
seperated from the main body, which I thought
was a good idea. Perhaps the machine did better
here (in Australia) than overseas, I'm not sure.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
December 27th, 2003, 05:37 PM
I think I know of the Compaq Portable 286, which has
that keyboard which can be seperated from the main
body, I think?

The Portable 286 that I'm talking about does have a detachable kbd, but it is the *full-sized* model. The case is the same size as the original Compaq 8088 models. They were only produced for a few months before Compaq came out with the Compaq II, a smaller, lighter version which was also '286-based.

Don't think I'm familiar with the Sanyo 775, but I know
of the Sanyo 555 which you could say is a 16bit
computer (8086 processor) but isn't IBM compatable
as it more of a home computer.

The 775 is a full-size luggable with a built-in *color* (CGA) display. (Another first). I also remember the 555 series, I used to have a few of them.

I keep forgetting to check the specs of some of
these computers, unfortunately I don't think I'll
have any room for a VT computer.

Aw, c'mon...it don't take up that much room...

Yes, it sounds interesting enough, I think though
it's a bit of a pity, that perhaps people are
marking it for being an IBM compatable, though
I would have thought there were some IBM
collectors.

Of course the shipping all the way to Oz might be prohibitive...

Seems strange that it's a rare machine, as I think I
have a couple of books (from around 1989) which
have this machine in it. The Compaq Portable I'm
thinking of was a 286 & had this keyboard which
seperated from the main body, which I thought
was a good idea. Perhaps the machine did better
here (in Australia) than overseas, I'm not sure.

Yeah, the one yr prolly thinking of is the newer Portable II. (see above).

Cheers,
CP/M User.

--T

CP/M User
December 27th, 2003, 07:57 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

>> I think I know of the Compaq Portable 286, which has
>> that keyboard which can be seperated from the main
>> body, I think?

> The Portable 286 that I'm talking about does have a
> detachable kbd, but it is the *full-sized* model. The
> case is the same size as the original Compaq 8088
> models. They were only produced for a few months
> before Compaq came out with the Compaq II, a
> smaller, lighter version which was also '286-based.

Fortunately, I haven't got my book on hand to check
which was which. They may have also called it a
Compaq Portable 286, even though it might of been
a Compaq II.

I don't know if it's possible if the Compaq II could
have been called Compaq Portable 286 here because
the original Compaq Portable 286 wasn't released
here.

>> Don't think I'm familiar with the Sanyo 775, but I know
>> of the Sanyo 555 which you could say is a 16bit
>> computer (8086 processor) but isn't IBM compatable
>> as it more of a home computer.

> The 775 is a full-size luggable with a built-in *color*
> (CGA) display. (Another first). I also remember
> the 555 series, I used to have a few of them.

That's strange, I thought the 555 also had CGA? Oh hang
on, it used a Colour TV, it didn't actually have a Display.

>> I keep forgetting to check the specs of some of
>> these computers, unfortunately I don't think I'll
>> have any room for a VT computer.

> Aw, c'mon...it don't take up that much room...

Oh well, I have plenty of IBMs as it is, sorry!

>> Yes, it sounds interesting enough, I think though
>> it's a bit of a pity, that perhaps people are
>> marking it for being an IBM compatable, though
>> I would have thought there were some IBM
>> collectors.

> Of course the shipping all the way to Oz might be
> prohibitive...

Don't think so, however for us it's important to get
the approrate equipment in order to get the thing
functioning.

>> Seems strange that it's a rare machine, as I think I
>> have a couple of books (from around 1989) which
>> have this machine in it. The Compaq Portable I'm
>> thinking of was a 286 & had this keyboard which
>> seperated from the main body, which I thought
>> was a good idea. Perhaps the machine did better
>> here (in Australia) than overseas, I'm not sure.

> Yeah, the one yr prolly thinking of is the newer Portable
> II. (see above).

Cheers.

mbbrutman
December 28th, 2003, 06:41 AM
There are many parts that never show up on eBay either. For example, I know there were several thousand hard drive units for PCjrs out there, from at least 4 or 5 different manufacturers. Yet in 3 years of scanning eBay I've never seen one show up.

Or how does one value an old IBM PC with 544K of memory, mono monitor, and 2 full height Tandon floppy drives? Seems like junk, right? Until you look at the BIOS date and it says Oct 1981 - the second revision of the IBM PC BIOS. This machine is so primitive that it doesn't know how to scan the ROM areas for hard drive adapters, EGA or VGA cards. I'd say that is pretty valuable.

My my PC AT with the working CMI hard drive in it. I've never seen one of those, and I'm sure most people wouldn't catch the significance of it.

Ebay is a marketplace. A pretty good one, but it's not all inclusive. It also distorts prices on rarer things, because the person with the most $$$ wins. In a large audience of people, that can result in quite a distortion.

Terry Yager
December 28th, 2003, 10:44 AM
Ebay is a marketplace. A pretty good one, but it's not all inclusive. It also distorts prices on rarer things, because the person with the most $$$ wins. In a large audience of people, that can result in quite a distortion.

I've always got what I felt was a fair price for everything I have sold on eBay, and paid a good price for what I have bought. I do have to admit tho, I have seen some ridiculous prices on some stuff...Ridiculously high as well as low.

--T

Erik
December 28th, 2003, 11:02 AM
There are many parts that never show up on eBay either. For example, I know there were several thousand hard drive units for PCjrs out there, from at least 4 or 5 different manufacturers. Yet in 3 years of scanning eBay I've never seen one show up.

I agree. eBay isn't and shouldn't be the only source of valuation. It's just a sample in the data set.

The Vintage Computer Marketplace (http://marketplace.vintage.org) as well as other online sales resources should also be considered.

Even garage sale, recycler and private party prices should be included.


Or how does one value an old IBM PC with 544K of memory, mono monitor, and 2 full height Tandon floppy drives? Seems like junk, right? Until you look at the BIOS date and it says Oct 1981 - the second revision of the IBM PC BIOS. This machine is so primitive that it doesn't know how to scan the ROM areas for hard drive adapters, EGA or VGA cards. I'd say that is pretty valuable.

I've got a first revision BIOS on one of my PCs and you're right, it's hard to place a value. Meanwhile, I bought it all for about $100, so it does have a price point, at least when purchased. I wouldn't sell it for twice that or even 10 times that.

A pristine 1st run PC in original boxes with PC-DOS 1.0 and other goodies (IBM printer, etc.) sold for about $600 on eBay recently. It was a bargain for the buyer since I've seen JUST PC-DOS 1.00 break that price.


My my PC AT with the working CMI hard drive in it. I've never seen one of those, and I'm sure most people wouldn't catch the significance of it.

Few would. Then again, few CMI drives survived so in a supply vs. demand world, there isn't much of either to boost the value of that drive, is there? (Hypothetically, of course.)


Ebay is a marketplace. A pretty good one, but it's not all inclusive. It also distorts prices on rarer things, because the person with the most $$$ wins. In a large audience of people, that can result in quite a distortion.

I'd argue that the distortion isn't really a distortion at all. If a buyer and a seller close a deal on an item at a given price, that price point has to be considered even if you or I think it's crazy. As you point out, the "crazy" prices go both ways so they will even out in the end, one hopes.

Erik

CP/M User
December 28th, 2003, 01:57 PM
"Erik" wrote:

>> There are many parts that never show up
>> on eBay either. For example, I know
>> there were several thousand hard drive
>> units for PCjrs out there, from at least 4
>> or 5 different manufacturers. Yet in 3
>> years of scanning eBay I've never seen
>> one show up.

> I agree. eBay isn't and shouldn't be the
> only source of valuation. It's just a sample
> in the data set.

Yes, I believe that the prices they have on eBay
can hardly be used to value a system, because
there could be a number of factors surrounding
the system on offer. A C64 wouldn't have much
value to it, but stick it with 1000 games & that
may be worth a fair wack too! ;-)

Also I don't know if you wanted to go into the
depths of international currencies, where a
system here could be cheap & work out cheaper
for an American to buy, than the same thing on
offer in the States! :-)

Cheers.

ribbets
January 26th, 2007, 08:38 AM
How would an Insurance Co. set a value on a collection such as Erik's.
I know when I insured some of my stamp collection, they:nervous: set the value from appraisers quotes ,and not from the blue book prices or the price I payed for them..some were even bought on E-bay. Felt almost like Antique Road Show ,except , I figure they lost about one third their value through appraisal.. and I no longer can keep them at home but in the safe deposit box..
They have a cash only value, no adjusted value in a replacement cost or no fair market value, only the cash value set at the time. So, as for my collection of vintage computers and their value,,,,There worth very little and I plan on keeping them at home...

Erik
January 26th, 2007, 10:33 AM
I don't know how my insurance company would handle my computers. I should probably give them a call and find out. . . :)

I know my car is set up under an "agreed value" policy which means that my insurer and I have agreed upon the price of the car and that's what I'll get paid in the event of a total loss. Repairs will be handled at market rates.

I'll probably need a rider of some sorts for my computer collection.

billdeg
January 26th, 2007, 04:24 PM
I was just literally running a diagnostic on this same machine 5 minutes ago. What kind of coincidence is that? I don't know how rare they are, but mine works. Here are the specs (from memory)
type 2 hard drive 20 meg
1664 RAM
lpt 1 and lpt3
one asynch card with port for mouse and one for modem
cga external jack
1.2M 5 1/4" drive
one more expansion slot.

The keyboard is detachable. I got mine at an antique shop I think, don't remember. I believe I paid $5.00.

Collectible Microcomputers by Michael Nadeau is becomming out-of-date, but the prices are relatively correct, meaning that the prices *were* correct in general at the time, and since then the pricing has continued on about the same tradgectory. What's great about the book is that it includes a lot of rare systems. Nothing's perfect, but this is a collector's bible as far as I am concerned.

billdeg
January 26th, 2007, 04:27 PM
I have an umbrella policy that covers my computers along with my other business computers (I run an ISP). I basically lumped them all in together.

EvanK
January 26th, 2007, 06:02 PM
Mike told me that his book draft included more than 1,200 computers, but his publisher cut out a lot of the similar versions to get it to 700. He also never even wanted it to be a price guide -- he just wanted to write a general guidebook -- but the publisher insisted on pricing data. He understood that pricing is so inconsistent that it's almost pointless. He did, however, put a couple of years of effort into making the prices as accurate and forward-thinking as possible.

Of course, like the title says, the book only covers commercially produced microcomputers. There's a big opportunity for someone to write a collectors guide to computers made before the micro era.

Terry Yager
January 26th, 2007, 08:19 PM
There is also a recently published (July, 2006) book dedicated to vintage laptops of the 1980 - 89 era. I haven't seen it yet, but I have drooled over it a couple of times.

http://www.amazon.com/Vintage-Laptop-Computers-Decade-1980-89/dp/1598004891/sr=1-8/qid=1169874768/ref=sr_1_8/102-8314786-0523324?ie=UTF8&s=books

--T

Micom 2000
January 26th, 2007, 09:16 PM
I rarely offer a computer in the VC forum other than a broad range of computers I might part with for a price. I do have a valuation in my mind despite whatever the undervaluation or overvaluation from Ebay. On the VCF with Terry giving out computers left and right it would seem ludacrous for example to quote a Kaypro X for $50 which could seem too much for some, but I would think of it as a bargain price. I'll sell it perhaps on E-Pay.

I've been collecting for many years and see no benefit in giving away some computer which I have hung on to for the the same price I paid for it, whether in a Yard-sale or from another person, which I wanted and possibly paid too much for (including shipping). If the prices on EPay go up and I'd rather have the money than my joy in using the machine, then I'll go for it.

An old friend of mine who loved the music scene was a record collector and dealer. I view his ethics and motivation as mine. I'm not an old computer dealer but I will occasionally offer items for sale which I no longer value so much. I wil ask fair value, whatever the current enthusiasm. I have dealt with some on VCF and I'd think they would judge me as honest and fair.

L

Mad-Mike
January 26th, 2007, 09:57 PM
I tried my hand at making a "Vintage PC Bluebook" awhile back covering just about any PC I came across, and comparing it to similar ones on E-bay and seeing howmuch they went for. However, due to the large number of white-boxes, home assembled, and so fourth computers, I gave up after awhile after taking on a NUMBEr of computers both name brand and white box.

Terry Yager
January 27th, 2007, 07:32 AM
I would think that $50.00 - 150.00 is a good price for a K-10, depending on condition, accessories, etc. I certainly wouldn't ask less for one in good shape (although I did recently give away a basket-case that needed several parts).

--T

EvanK
January 27th, 2007, 01:06 PM
There is also a recently published (July, 2006) book dedicated to vintage laptops of the 1980 - 89 era. I haven't seen it yet, but I have drooled over it a couple of times.

http://www.amazon.com/Vintage-Laptop-Computers-Decade-1980-89/dp/1598004891/sr=1-8/qid=1169874768/ref=sr_1_8/102-8314786-0523324?ie=UTF8&s=books

--T

I have that book. It's okay for a general overview but it stinks as a real guide such as Mike's book. The thing is, the laptop book's author isn't a collector like you and me; he's just a guy who likes to make lists of things. A majority of the data for each computer in his book are just one-paragraph blurbs copied from elsewhere and barely even changed. You're better off just using the "museum" feature of a site like www.old-computers.com for reference data.

Micom 2000
January 27th, 2007, 01:14 PM
By the way, that post of mine wasn't a critisism of you, T. Lord knows you've helped many of us on the VCF, including myself. What I'm trying to say is that VCF also distorts the value estimation since things come up here for ridiculously low cost or free. As a result some of the younger members can be shocked when they get a valid quote. For this reason I prefer selling my stuff on EPay. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but it tends to balance out.

Lawrence

Terry Yager
January 27th, 2007, 01:35 PM
Thanx for the tip, Evan. You've probably saved me fifteen buck$.

And no, L, that wasn't my defense mechanisms kicking-in, just a simple comment.

--T

EvanK
January 27th, 2007, 04:48 PM
There's also a book called "A Collector's Guide to Personal Computers and Pocket Calculators" by Thomas F. Haddock. It's somewhat older -- from 1993 -- but still worth picking up. I got a used copy via Bookfinder.com for a few bucks. Don't the title fool you; the focus is computers.

curtis
January 27th, 2007, 05:55 PM
There's also a book called "A Collector's Guide to Personal Computers and Pocket Calculators" by Thomas F. Haddock. It's somewhat older -- from 1993 -- but still worth picking up. I got a used copy via Bookfinder.com for a few bucks. Don't the title fool you; the focus is computers.

I've got both Dr. Haddock's and Mr. Wilson's books. They're both pretty good guides for the main stream stuff. But if you get into some of the more unusual items, brother, you're on your own.

Like it's been said earlier, ebay isn't much help either. Prices fluctuate up and down and all around like a roller coaster. One T100 will sell for $50 and another IDENTICAL unit will sell 10 minutes later for $100+!

Then again, an EXTREMELY rare item can be had for $0.99.

Basically I think it comes down to if you think something is worth a given amount, it is, until you try to sell it! Then all bets are off.

Curtis

ribbets
January 30th, 2007, 11:53 AM
After checking my mail today , I see a notice PCM will no longer carry 3.5 floppy drives after the present stock is gone .. Do you suppose its time to start hoarding these little jewels and helping to get the price up on the E-bay.

80sFreak
January 30th, 2007, 03:34 PM
The PC World being talked about is a computer store chain in London, England (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/6314251.stm), who are just trying to get some publicity.. In this thread (http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?t=5069), Athana (http://www.athana.com/) is talked about which still makes reel-to-reel tape and 8" floppy diskettes! So I do not think there will be a shortage any time soon... :)

Cheers,

80sFreak

carlsson
January 30th, 2007, 11:34 PM
Interesting point:


Interestingly, software giant Microsoft seems to be keeping the flame alight for the floppy. Its newly-released operating system Vista still pays homage to it by continuing to use a floppy disk as the icon for saving a document in Microsoft Word 2007.

I suppose a hard disk isn't as aestethic, and a CD icon will look like Word can only burn documents directly to CD-R. USB sticks come in many different styles. Perhaps floppy disks will live on in our memories for many years to come, even if they don't exist in the flesh.

dongfeng
January 31st, 2007, 01:38 AM
The PC World being talked about is a computer store chain in London, England (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/6314251.stm), who are just trying to get some publicity.


PC World are one of the worst computer shops I have ever had the displeasure of visiting. It's fun to go and annoy the salespeople there, as they really have no idea what they are talking about :lol:

carlsson
January 31st, 2007, 04:38 AM
Out of the computer supermarkets I've seen so far, I found them to be among the better ones, both when it comes to selection, pricing and to lesser degree staff skills. Of course, a smaller size computer store has even more qualified personel, and mail order is cheaper, but from my experience, it could be worse.

Leofan7
February 2nd, 2007, 02:55 PM
I purchased my Commodore 64 in near-mint condition for $12.82 at a thrift store, and I bought a Tandy 102 for $13.50 minus shipping on eBay.

ahm
February 2nd, 2007, 04:58 PM
Ah yes, the Commodore 64: "Limited Edition of 15 million" :-)

Druid6900
February 9th, 2007, 03:12 PM
I have a Samsung SD-700, working perfectly, original keyboard, original box. To some, it's a piece of old junk, to others, it would be the crowning jewel of their collection.

There is no logic and there are no "benchmark" prices. It's worth whatever the buyer, at the moment, is willing to pay for it.

I found that out on e-bay and that's why I went to my own non-ebay online store. I set what I think is a reasonable price and it is either bought or not.

Just my view on the matter

coony
May 12th, 2008, 02:36 PM
I've got a 1994 Magitronic TS34X laptop and I'm curious if it would be worth anything. If so, any ideas as to how much? I know it all depends on what someone's willing to pay, but I didn't want to get rid of it without trying to find out.

Vint
June 9th, 2008, 05:49 AM
I don't know maybe it's just me or maybe this CoCo III that just sold on eBay for a whoppin' $265. is a bit on the high side. :)

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=350066324671&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=022

As I recall the CoCo III is cooler than my CoCo II with 64k - but over $250. worth?
I paid $10.50, I believe it was for my pristine condition CoCo II on eBay. I had a CoCo III years back but gave it away. If I'd have known it must be made from precious metals, I'd have kept her. :eek:

Perhaps people just get warped up in the moment.

Micom 2000
June 9th, 2008, 05:30 PM
When I read the post I expected it as being pristine but also with a disk-drive interface and some of the many modifications with hard disk and including OS9.

Wow ! I guess I'd better put on priority finishing my adding a second FD to my FD 502.
I also have some other cartridges besides the FD cartridge as well as OS9 and joysticks.
At that price I could put a $400 reserve on my whole Coco 3 package, with no reticence.

I think some of the attraction was all the manuals in the original packaging. Newbies with cash to spare.

Lawrence

Sharkonwheels
June 9th, 2008, 07:27 PM
The CoCo 3's are machines in my posession I try NOT to unload.
I have probably a half dozen CC3's, all but 1 are 512kb, 2-3 multipacks, a few of the speech/sound, modem, and serial cartridges, and stacks of books, manuals, disks. Probably have at LEAST a half dozen or so FD501 and 502 drives, plus no-name 3rd party FDD setups, even to dual 720kb 5.25" (mitsu M4853), 2 complete burke and Burke XT/RTC MDM controllers with drives. Also have some newer stuff, like Cloud 9's TC^3 SCSI, SuperIDE, 2-3 CM-8 monitors, etc...

Other stuff I'll buy and sell all day - CoCo stuff I only keep :)


T

Micom 2000
June 10th, 2008, 12:20 AM
Whoa ! It's been a long time since I checked my CoCos out. I have 2 CoCo 2s and a grey CoCo 1 as well as the CoCo 3. I think I put things on hold waiting to figure out the plugs for adding the second FD to the 502. I can't even remember what I hooked up the CoCos to. Probably a TV. Altho "Cloud Nine" has done amazing things for CoCo and OS9 is a serious operating system, it always seemed lame that they used the cartridge hookup for FDs and perhaps I didn't understand the audio/video and RF RCA plug ports. I would have expected a 3rd RCA plug as in 8-bit Ataris and Commodores. Even the joystick port connections wasn't standard 9-pin nor was the serial connecter. And a cassette connection ??

I recently acquired a CM11 to replace the CM 5 on my Tandy SX. You seem to suggest that I could possibly use this 9-pin monitor connection with my CoCo 3. It would obviously require an adapter or a cartridge(? heaven forbid). I have 3 Rainbow zines including the biggie which explained it all as well as a multitude of 80Computing which was going to be my source when I finished that #@^!$&* 2nd FD adaption. "Soon come, mon. soon come"
I rememeber being quite impressed with it's graphics, and that Scriptsit which was perhaps the best early editor of all, including Wordstar, had been ported to it on cartridge.

If you have any comments perhaps this could be transferred by one of the monitors to another thread in the Tandy section. Altho hijacking this one doesn't seem a problem. I would however like to learn more about this iconic machine and possibly other enthusiasts would come out of the woodwork.

Lawrence



The CoCo 3's are machines in my posession I try NOT to unload.
I have probably a half dozen CC3's, all but 1 are 512kb, 2-3 multipacks, a few of the speech/sound, modem, and serial cartridges, and stacks of books, manuals, disks. Probably have at LEAST a half dozen or so FD501 and 502 drives, plus no-name 3rd party FDD setups, even to dual 720kb 5.25" (mitsu M4853), 2 complete burke and Burke XT/RTC MDM controllers with drives. Also have some newer stuff, like Cloud 9's TC^3 SCSI, SuperIDE, 2-3 CM-8 monitors, etc...

Other stuff I'll buy and sell all day - CoCo stuff I only keep :)


T

tezza
June 10th, 2008, 12:51 AM
I wish I HAD a Coco. In the 9 months I've been looking I've never seen one our National auction site.

I've seen a few on Ebay in Australia, but the bids got above what I was prepared to part with once shipping was taken into account.

One day maybe...

Tez

DarthKur
June 10th, 2008, 04:22 AM
The CoCo 3's are machines in my posession I try NOT to unload.
I have probably a half dozen CC3's, all but 1 are 512kb, 2-3 multipacks, a few of the speech/sound, modem, and serial cartridges, and stacks of books, manuals, disks. Probably have at LEAST a half dozen or so FD501 and 502 drives, plus no-name 3rd party FDD setups, even to dual 720kb 5.25" (mitsu M4853), 2 complete burke and Burke XT/RTC MDM controllers with drives. Also have some newer stuff, like Cloud 9's TC^3 SCSI, SuperIDE, 2-3 CM-8 monitors, etc...

Other stuff I'll buy and sell all day - CoCo stuff I only keep :)


T


Oh man, you're killing me. I thought I had a nice amount of CoCo stuff. I would seriously love to get a CM-8, Speech cart and the 512k upgrade. I know that Cloud 9 has the 512k available but definitely not the other two.
Have you tried out the CC3 specific version of Donkey Kong? It looks excellent. It's the primary reason I must get the memory upgrade soon. :mrgreen:

bobsstuff
June 11th, 2008, 03:47 PM
On the Compaq 286 suitcases, I put a lot of 4 for parts on ebay. I plugged them in the they did on display -- I unplugged them. Starting price was $19.99 for all 4 with pickup only near Los Angeles. NO BIDS.

As a dealer and not a collector I now scrap a lot of old computers. I still have the suitcases. More money in taking them apart. Funny I pulled a clone suitcase (Imperial) the other day to test. If if runs I'll put it on ebay.

As far as a price guide goes, I watch some prices and there is no way to create an ebay price guide. A working IBM 5160 can go from $20 on up to $249. Someone dumping one or one of the dealers looking for just the right customer. There are so many "deals" on ebay, the prices are all over the board.

Every time I see some computer go high, I try to sell the same computer in better condition, or 30% or more less and can't sell it. This drives me crazy all the time. Shippping costs do not help. What ships for $20 close to home ships for $50 across the country.

I have an IBM 5085 2A, maybe two of them. The old huge box with RGB BNC Video output. None on ebay in the last 3 months. I'll probably part them out.
It is a shame.

tezza
June 11th, 2008, 05:09 PM
Shippping costs do not help. What ships for $20 close to home ships for $50 across the country.


Yes, I find shipping is a big issue with collecting computers, even within my own country.

For example, there has been a PS/2 Model 30 for sale here for many months now. It's always getting relisted. The seller wants around $55 NZ dollars for it (about $US 40 ). A machine like that, here, is probably worth about that.

However, the seller lives in quite a small place at least a couple of hours from any of the larger centres (and keep in mind a "large centre" in New Zealand is small in terms of population by international standards). That means for most who might want this, it either needs to be shipped OR you have to drive a fair way to collect it.

So you add either shipping or pickup costs onto this and it will bump up the price considerably. I live about 2.5 hours by car and to go there and back to pick it up (these days) will probably cost me $60-$70 in fuel alone. Getting a heavy item like this shipped will probably be $30-$40, and there is the risk of damage.

So a $55 vintage computer, even sold within the country, actually becomes something that's pushing $100. It's not worth that much to me, or to most others either it seems because it never gets any bids.

It's a problem for buyers and sellers in remote population centres, and it won't get any easier as the price of oil skyrockets.

Nothing much can be done about it unfortunately. :(

Tez

gcarrick
October 13th, 2010, 10:10 PM
I will have to admit that I have not read this entire thread. It is late and the thread is very long. So I hope that I an not rehashing old ground.

We all want this information. The problem clearly is that no one person could afford the time to maintain it. I suggest that the answer is a sort of Wiki - distribute the work. Put up a Wiki that anybody can add a machine to. Let people add machines/ models. Be generous in excepting items. Is a watch a computer? Is a smartphone? Then let people append prices, dates, notes of units sold. Ignore shipping - that is a peripheral issue (excuse the expression.) If the seller is in Alaska then shipping would be a problem. But that has nothing to do with the worth of the machine. (I understand that you are a buyer then the shipping is an issue, but there is no way to factor that in.) I think we all agree that asking prices are not useful. If the Wiki idea is valid then bogus information would get corrected quickly.

MattCarp
October 30th, 2010, 05:54 PM
I will have to admit that I have not read this entire thread. It is late and the thread is very long. So I hope that I an not rehashing old ground.

We all want this information. The problem clearly is that no one person could afford the time to maintain it. I suggest that the answer is a sort of Wiki - distribute the work. Put up a Wiki that anybody can add a machine to. Let people add machines/ models. Be generous in excepting items. Is a watch a computer? Is a smartphone? Then let people append prices, dates, notes of units sold. Ignore shipping - that is a peripheral issue (excuse the expression.) If the seller is in Alaska then shipping would be a problem. But that has nothing to do with the worth of the machine. (I understand that you are a buyer then the shipping is an issue, but there is no way to factor that in.) I think we all agree that asking prices are not useful. If the Wiki idea is valid then bogus information would get corrected quickly.

Love it. In fact, a Wiki would be a great repository for technical info, troubleshooting, FAQs, as well as sales information.

You'd need a way to validate the sales information, lest it be corrupted by those looking to pump the value of their TI-99/4A's !

per
October 31st, 2010, 06:38 AM
Love it. In fact, a Wiki would be a great repository for technical info, troubleshooting, FAQs, as well as sales information.

You'd need a way to validate the sales information, lest it be corrupted by those looking to pump the value of their TI-99/4A's !

We already got a wiki here that could be used for this.
http://wiki.vintage-computer.com/

Gfbtdhg1
June 26th, 2017, 03:25 AM
Do you still have those? Even if you don't how much would one be worth?

billdeg
July 4th, 2017, 05:59 AM
If you seriously want to make a price guide you need the Ebay data in a format you can include in an automated process
https://go.developer.ebay.com/what-ebay-api

Here is an example of an outfit that uses the API and handles many other types of collectibles, but note how they use the API to track activity, prices, trending:
http://www.collectorsweekly.com/electronics/computers

It can be done, but you're limited by the API library. Python seems to be the best language because the most examples are in python.

I have a big data cluster here at my home, I can feed this data into there for analysis, but you can use mYSql or whatever. Regarding the original poster, what is the point of the price guide exactly? The catalog of home computers (at least) is out there, wonder what it would cost to purchase a copy of the data. With this you can cross reference the "everything" table with the sales from Ebay to get a picture of the frequency and apparent rarity of an item.

The Compaq 286 btw was the temporary name of the Compaq II. They're the same thing. The "286" is much rarer, but *value* <> rarity. I have one here.

I do this kind of programming work for a living and if you have the $$ I have the time :-)

AAGDOS
July 7th, 2018, 12:29 PM
I have had a Compaq Portable III ( with 80286 chip I believe) since 1988. It is in excellent condition although when I pulled it out of the closet a year ago the display wouldn't work. Neither would a "default display" connected with a 9 - 15 pin adapter. I'm trying to figure out where (or how) to get it fixed by someone who knows these. It may just be a matter of switches or jumpers "messed up".?? I have a posting in this forum with 15 views but no replies??? Any ideas?

Druid6900
July 11th, 2018, 08:47 AM
It's probably the power supply, it was a weak point in all the Compaq "portables".

People miss this because they ca hear the fan spinning, but that's just because it's attached right to the power cord socket.

If you don't see any other signs of activity (drive lights, etc) then that's your problem.

You might be lucky and it's just the fuse. The holder is part of the power cord receptacle and, if you look closely, you can see where you can pry the fuse holder out. They usually put a spare fuse in there too.

The power supplies they used in these portables are almost impossible to find (because they blew up) and they are NOT a lot of fun to repair either. I have a Plus here in inventory with a dead supply and unless someone gets in touch with us and wants to buy it, it'll stay dead. Even then, we'll probably draw straws to see who has to work on it.....