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romanon
February 18th, 2017, 11:48 PM
Hi, my question - how to correctly storrage my IBM PCs? Some tips for PCs HDDs and monitors?
It is better to power on occasionally or its better to not power on and just storing covered in dry room?

Thanks

KC9UDX
February 19th, 2017, 06:45 AM
In my experience, it's best to turn them on and use them regularly.

paul
February 19th, 2017, 11:09 AM
Not based on rigorous science but if there are no hard disks present my present policy is to power them up once a year for 24 hours for the benefit of electrolytic caps. Mine still have the original caps and they're still going strong. That applies to monitors as well.
With hard disks, add once every 6 months at least an hour to keep the heads from sticking.

Store in a dry environment not too close to windows to avoid sun, if uncovered. If they are covered leave covers loose for plenty of airflow.
Mine are on display in the living room and have not deteriorated at all in the last decade. Like any other collectables, they look great "as a set."

Chuck(G)
February 19th, 2017, 12:06 PM
Just remember to remove the *($%! batteries if you're going to store them for a long time.

HoJoPo
February 19th, 2017, 12:51 PM
If you're in a humid environment and putting them in long term storage (not on display), you may consider sealing them in plastic bags, including some bags (not little packets) of silica gel or some other desiccant. This will help prevent any further corrosion due to moisture from occurring. The bag will also keep additional dust from building up inside, and should hopefully keep out insects and other critters as well.

As mentioned above, removing the batteries is a good plan, and powering them up annually is a good idea if you want to keep them in working condition. You can bake the desiccant and re-use it (well, some kinds of desiccant you can....)

wesleyfurr
February 27th, 2017, 05:49 PM
Just remember to remove the *($%! batteries if you're going to store them for a long time.

Absolutely! I'll emphatically second that comment. Watch out for those little soldered-on NiCd type barrel batteries too...I've got a small stack of ruined (at least to me) VLB-era 486's because of those, along with an old Sperry XT PC...but that's not as bad as what happened to a Mac IIci, IIcx, and my beloved Tandy 3000HD... :-(

Wesley

Timo W.
February 28th, 2017, 12:59 AM
If you're in a humid environment and putting them in long term storage (not on display), you may consider sealing them in plastic bags, including some bags (not little packets) of silica gel or some other desiccant.
I would highly recommend not to seal them! Silica gel can only absorb a limited amount of moisture; what remains will cause mold over time. It's much better to use plastic bags with small holes to allow air to flow. Then put the wrapped items into a carton and put a larger bag of silica gel inside this carton. That allows air to flow (prevents mold) and you can easily replace the silica gel from time to time.

Flamin Joe
February 28th, 2017, 01:31 AM
I would highly recommend not to seal them! Silica gel can only absorb a limited amount of moisture; what remains will cause mold over time. It's much better to use plastic bags with small holes to allow air to flow. Then put the wrapped items into a carton and put a larger bag of silica gel inside this carton. That allows air to flow (prevents mold) and you can easily replace the silica gel from time to time.

I think sealing is an option but don't just rely on Silica Gel to do the job as I agree it will only absorb a limited amount. A much better solution would be something like this (https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/air-moisture-removal-box.html) which draws the moisture out of the air and traps it within a clear container so you can actually check on it's progress. Compared to Silica Gel, these things draw an incredible amount of water out of the air.

KC9UDX
February 28th, 2017, 04:42 AM
Your linky no work here, but, if you mean those litle plastic buckets with the silica gel inside and the filter paper on top, I agree.

If they work good enough for million dollar CNC machines being stored in seaside warehouses, they work for this stuff.