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View Full Version : What uses a 287 co processor.



moijk
April 20th, 2017, 08:05 AM
I've aquired a 287 co processor. not sure if it is the original or later models. Just curious what actually uses that? I just like hardware, so whatever fits on my boards goes on my boards. ;)

flashedbios2012
April 22nd, 2017, 08:34 AM
Anything with a 80286 as its primary CPU.

eeguru
April 22nd, 2017, 08:46 AM
Some early 386 motherboards had 287 sockets as well.

Chuck(G)
April 22nd, 2017, 09:09 AM
Some early 386 motherboards had 287 sockets as well.

Yup, got one of those myself. 20MHz 80386.

moijk
April 22nd, 2017, 09:53 AM
I was thinking what kind of software that utilized them. anything.. fun? ;)

but anyway. it is a 10mhz one. does it matter what kind of 286 I use it with? I got 8, 10 and 12mhz models. Maybe other speeds too, I take what I'm given or what is available at a cheap price locally ;)

Xacalite
April 22nd, 2017, 12:18 PM
If you mean software, it's mostly CAD stuff, math packages, spreadsheets.
Hardly ever vintage games - Mobygames only finds 7 pre-1995 games with FPU support.

gepooljr
April 22nd, 2017, 01:17 PM
The only game I ever found that used the x87 floating point was a shareware game called Begins. Fun game - based on the old Trek73 but a lot more fun.

KC9UDX
April 22nd, 2017, 01:20 PM
Most notably, AutoCAD. It runs painfully slow with an 80287 emulator.

modem7
April 22nd, 2017, 02:17 PM
Earlier thread on the subject:

http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?47705-Software-which-can-use-8087-80287-coprocessor

PgrAm
April 22nd, 2017, 02:31 PM
I'm not sure about the 287 specifically but I heard SimCity classic uses the fpu, I dissasembled it and sure enough it uses a bunch of FPU instructions, not sure exactly why yet though.

EDIT: after a little research it seems the 80287 didn't add that many extra features over the 8087, So I doubt much software supported it specifically.

Xacalite
April 22nd, 2017, 03:27 PM
BTW, I think the most interesting game which took advantage of FPU was Scorched Earth.
Its trajectory calculations were very realistic, and included many variables: gravity, wind, air viscosity, etc., so a coprocessor was very useful indeed.

Chuck(G)
April 22nd, 2017, 04:02 PM
Interesting that nobody mentioned Lotus 1-2-3 or SuperCalc, etc.

For many users, these were the primary reason to buy an NDP. I guess that tastes change. :(

modem7
April 22nd, 2017, 05:06 PM
Interesting that nobody mentioned Lotus 1-2-3 or SuperCalc, etc.
Lotus 1-2-3 is quoted in the thread that I referred to.

Xacalite
April 22nd, 2017, 05:29 PM
Interesting that nobody mentioned Lotus 1-2-3 or SuperCalc, etc.
Hey, I did mention "spreadsheets".
For me, the primary spreadsheet in the 286 era was Quattro Pro.

KC9UDX
April 22nd, 2017, 07:06 PM
It seemed to me at that time that the most popular was AppleWorks because early //es were going cheap, there was no copy protection, and then everyone that wanted a spreadsheet had one.