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romanon
May 13th, 2017, 12:51 AM
Hello, I want to introduce you my new IBM PC - Hardware Collection web page.
It contains all my IBM hardware from IBM PC era computers with pictures and short description.

I welcome all opinions and notitions.

The address is http://ibm-pc.webnode.sk

Roman

Xacalite
May 13th, 2017, 04:26 AM
http://files.ibm-pc.webnode.sk/200000103-b11efb21a6/700/IBM_GtO_PC_kasette.JPG
So, there were some PC software released on cassettes!
Is that cassette still readable?

romanon
May 13th, 2017, 05:18 AM
Yes, once I tried load this program from casette to my PC, there is some simple diagnostic utility very similar to floppy version of "IBM diagnostic"

MicroCoreLabs
May 13th, 2017, 10:26 AM
No PCjr's in the collection? :)

romanon
May 13th, 2017, 11:03 AM
No, i am not fan of this computer :) And also its not "Personal Computer" at all :)

krebizfan
May 13th, 2017, 12:06 PM
Nice website. Good seeing the younger set appreciating older computers. The images doing a mini-zoom as the mouse passes over them is a little disconcerting.

romanon
May 13th, 2017, 12:12 PM
Thanks, i know but i cant change this image setting. Maybe i should contact site helpdesk for it...

Trixter
May 13th, 2017, 02:14 PM
No, i am not fan of this computer :) And also its not "Personal Computer" at all :)

Can you elaborate on why the PCjr was not a "personal computer"?

lyonadmiral
May 13th, 2017, 02:45 PM
Hello, I want to introduce you my new IBM PC - Hardware Collection web page.
It contains all my IBM hardware from IBM PC era computers with pictures and short description.

I welcome all opinions and notitions.

The address is http://ibm-pc.webnode.sk

Roman

Roman,

I check out your website, very nice done.

One question, were you mad when you were taking the pictures? You look angry. :)

-Daniel

Caluser2000
May 13th, 2017, 03:29 PM
Roman your site is very nicely done.

modem7
May 13th, 2017, 03:45 PM
Note that the IBM 5170 had model numbers, not type numbers. See [here (http://minuszerodegrees.net/5170/doco/5170_documentation.htm)].
The motherboards in the 5170 had type numbers. See [here (http://minuszerodegrees.net/misc/5170_motherboard_types.jpg)].

(There's always a party pooper.)

romanon
May 13th, 2017, 07:51 PM
Can you elaborate on why the PCjr was not a "personal computer"?

I dont know, i quess that its more like "Home Computer", not fully compatible with IBM PC familly, no ISA extensions, different motherboard, ROM cassetes....
My opinion is that its more console than PC...


Roman your site is very nicely done.

Thanks :)


Roman,

I check out your website, very nice done.

One question, were you mad when you were taking the pictures? You look angry. :)

-Daniel

Haha, i dont know, maybe its my default face setting :)


Note that the IBM 5170 had model numbers, not type numbers. See [here (http://minuszerodegrees.net/5170/doco/5170_documentation.htm)].
The motherboards in the 5170 had type numbers. See [here (http://minuszerodegrees.net/misc/5170_motherboard_types.jpg)].

(There's always a party pooper.)

Mmm yes i know....the real reason is, that my "type 1" AT is completely folded machine. Empty case with PS was rescued from junkyard, all other parts was obtained separately from different sources...So i dont know, maybe case with PS are from the model 319/339, other parts from 068/099 who knows? But ok, i will working on it.

Xacalite
May 14th, 2017, 05:53 AM
BTW: were there any PC clones made in CSRS? I mean stuff made from Czechoslovak (or other Eastern Block) components, not just assembled from Far Eastern parts.

In Poland, there were such attempts, notably Mazovia 1016, which was rather pathetic: based on Soviet 8086 clone (when 386 machines were already available), with non-standard ISA slots, and infamous Hungarian FDDs which hardly ever worked even brand-new :mrgreen:

romanon
May 14th, 2017, 11:44 PM
Yes, we had "PP06" computer in Czechoslovakia. It was XT clone computer with pasive bus with special nonISA slots, but there were reductions to work with IBM ISA standard.
I have one, here are pictures.

38535 38536

Xacalite
May 15th, 2017, 01:17 AM
Come to think of it, East German Robotron PC machines also used non-standard expansion slots.
I don't get it, why did they all come out with their own connectors?

romanon
May 15th, 2017, 02:07 AM
I don't get it, why did they all come out with their own connectors?

Obviously some East-block restrictions...

archeocomp
May 15th, 2017, 02:24 AM
In Poland, there were such attempts, notably Mazovia 1016, which was rather pathetic: based on Soviet 8086 clone (when 386 machines were already available), with non-standard ISA slots, and infamous Hungarian FDDs which hardly ever worked even brand-new :mrgreen:
Mazovia 1016 was actually pretty standard. It is utilising one of the far east TurboXT motherboards. Believe me I own two of them:-) BTW my first computer was PP-06.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-R-3q2y_2ccY/USZWX9lqRQI/AAAAAAAAADI/sDVx9GzjQyc/s1600/mobo91.jpg

Xacalite
May 15th, 2017, 03:59 AM
Mazovia 1016 was actually pretty standard. It is utilising one of the far east TurboXT motherboards. Believe me I own two of them:-)
That means you have late variants - chips on your board are from late 1989, when communism was already falling, borders became open, and import from Far East became more feasible than local production.
Earlier variants had mobos made in Poland, with expansion slots for cards with pins instead of edge connectors, and K1810 WM 86 @ 4.77 MHz.
I saw some mention of adapters to allow usage of standard ISA cards in Mazovia, but never actually seen such adapters.

archeocomp
May 15th, 2017, 05:28 AM
Good info. Thanks :-) I was also wondering what those labels on EPROM stickers say..

Xacalite
May 15th, 2017, 09:06 AM
I was also wondering what those labels on EPROM stickers say..
Nothing, they are obviously incomplete, I don't know what was supposed to be written on there.
What's interesting is that there are two EPROMs - I guess BIOS and BASIC, and I don't think BASIC was standard on these boards, see the attached photo of other late Mazovia 1016 - one of the ROM sockets is empty.

Hehe, the markings read "8088-2" and "8087-2", even though with the 30 MHz XTAL 8088-1 and 8087-1 are required...

clh333
May 17th, 2017, 03:15 AM
You may be justifiably proud of your collection and its presentation on your web site. If I may, however, I would like to take exception to your statement: "My first computer approx. 20 years ago was at that time obsolete computer IBM PC XT. There were not many things to do with it, so I've spent the time with disassembling and adjusting."

I too enjoy the process of bringing one of these old machines back from neglect, but the software of the day was quite capable as well. I got into collecting and restoring old computers out of a need to find a platform for my collection of old software. It is true that the presentation was not as sophisticated and the documentation was often incorrect or simply incomplete, but the process of using the old software in a way presents the same sort of challenges that restoring the old hardware does: You are presented with puzzles to solve.

My two cents, not to be taken as criticism of your lovely collection.

-CH-