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wez
January 3rd, 2007, 10:49 AM
What hardware and software upgrades can I use for it to work in windows XP and need a large storage for files as well. Pls help

Vlad
January 3rd, 2007, 11:48 AM
Xp on a 286 processor?? Is this a joke? When I think Storage and Windows XP, I think Workstation, not 16-bit 286 class machines. Try again.

carlsson
January 3rd, 2007, 12:07 PM
Does those Make-It 486 upgrades work on just about any 286 based computer? If so, maybe XP can be made bootable on a 486. But it would be a truly painful experience.

I think the best "upgrade" if you want to run Windows XP is to sell the 286 on eBay and put whatever money you get from that into a fund to buy a second hand Pentium III-class or better computer.

The other option, which may be frown upon on this forum, is to replace all the interior (motherboard, power supply, drives and so on) and modify the case to take a modern ATX board. :-P Only recommended if it is a dime a dozen 286.

Vlad
January 3rd, 2007, 12:17 PM
Blasphemy!

dongfeng
January 3rd, 2007, 01:52 PM
What is the fastest you can go with an AT mainboard? Personally I haven't seen an AT board newer than Socket 7, so that gives a fastest possible speed of ~550MHz?

Anonymous Coward
January 3rd, 2007, 04:48 PM
Windows XP needs a Pentium CPU. It's already been attempted on a 486, and i haven't found anyone who got it to work. I have a 256mb 486 system that I wanted to try Eckspee on, but Windows 2000 is the best I can do. Windows 2000 claims to need a Pentium CPU also, but there are some tricks that can be done to get it going.

...and yes indeed, those Make-it 486 CPUs do work on just about any 286 system. I installed one in my original IBM AT 5170 motherboard. Though, it was a little quirky. I solved the problem by swapping in a generic Award v3.03 BIOS. It's still slow, but it can run 32-bit code now. I haven't tried win95 or win98, but I doubt either would run very fast.

Finally, I believe there were also some Pentium Pro and Pentium II motherboards made for AT formfactor. Infact, I believe the PII boards can go up to 1GHz PIIIs. I seem to recall there was a popular model from Asus.

Terry Yager
January 3rd, 2007, 04:56 PM
What hardware and software upgrades can I use for it to work in windows XP and need a large storage for files as well. Pls help

Hell, I dunno...I'm still trying to get Windows 3.11 to run on my Kaypro 10!

--T

IBMMuseum
January 3rd, 2007, 05:45 PM
What is the fastest you can go with an AT mainboard? Personally I haven't seen an AT board newer than Socket 7, so that gives a fastest possible speed of ~550MHz?

I have a Tyan "Baby AT" that is Slot 1 with a 100MHz FSB (so likely to go up to at least a 600 to 800MHz PIII). For a time I thought of running XP (capable enough) on it while in an XT case. The "XP XT"!

carlsson
January 3rd, 2007, 10:41 PM
Perhaps there is some DOS or otherwise based VNC client one could install on a 286 class computer and from there connect to a more powerful machine running e.g. XP, Server 2003 or for that matter some Linux dist etc. It is not equivalent of running the operating system natively, but for the given spec I think it would run faster than even if the 286 could be fitted for Windows XP.

dongfeng
January 4th, 2007, 12:34 AM
Windows XP needs a Pentium CPU. It's already been attempted on a 486, and i haven't found anyone who got it to work. I have a 256mb 486 system that I wanted to try Eckspee on, but Windows 2000 is the best I can do. Windows 2000 claims to need a Pentium CPU also, but there are some tricks that can be done to get it going.

Since XP tests for a Pentium processor before installation, it can't be installed on a 486.

However, I've always wondered if it would work by using a Pentium Overdrive processor on a 486 mainboard, then once installed swapping it for a DX4 or something similar.

carlsson
January 4th, 2007, 01:18 AM
Aren't there full computers incorporated on a single expansion card, or is that more common for PCI architectures? I thought something along if it was possible to put a Pentium something CPU on an 16 bit ISA expansion card, perhaps also add an ATA IDE interface on another expansion card, making the poor 286 work more like a passive backplane than computer on its own. It probably would be deadly complex to engineer, cost a small fortune to realize and still be horribly hampered by all bottlenecks presented by the host architecture. But it would make it possible to run most modern software on an old computer without removing the 286.

Edit: This product is referred to as suitable for industrial PCs with an ISA backplane. Would it be operational in a "normal" ISA based PC? The particular product has a 400 MHz VIA Eden installed, but can be bought with a VIA C3 instead if you want a little more boost. The same manufacturer has several similar boards with varying specs. There is no price indication, but I found one reseller listing it at $340. While you could get a decent second hand Pentium 4 system including a bigger monitor and perhaps a XP license for the same money, it is not quite as expensive as I would've thought.

http://www.acrosser.com/Product/Full%20or%20Half%20size%20PC/ISA%20SBC/isa_eden_b1672.html

(Side note: Sometimes when searching for technical specs, all you get are resellers. Sometimes when you search for resellers, all you get is technical specs or pages asking you to make an inquiry)

chuckcmagee
January 4th, 2007, 05:39 AM
I have a Tyan "Baby AT" that is Slot 1 with a 100MHz FSB (so likely to go up to at least a 600 to 800MHz PIII). For a time I thought of running XP (capable enough) on it while in an XT case. The "XP XT"!


I have a "baby AT" ASUS P2B-B that I got off of ebay for cheap. It does 1000 Mhz PIII with no sweat (100Mhz FSB memory in there too).

I was using it as my "file and print server" for a long time (yes, yes, using XP Pro in fact).

rmay635703
January 11th, 2007, 12:40 PM
Since XP tests for a Pentium processor before installation, it can't be installed on a 486.

However, I've always wondered if it would work by using a Pentium Overdrive processor on a 486 mainboard, then once installed swapping it for a DX4 or something similar.

If you put in a POD your 486 will run windows XP but if you then remove the POD your XPerience stops with a blue screen mid way through the first boot screen.

I believe a program like windows XP lite stealing the shell from say 2k might run an XP look alike on the 486 but not real certain.

Cheers

Mike Chambers
January 11th, 2007, 05:09 PM
Perhaps there is some DOS or otherwise based VNC client one could install on a 286 class computer and from there connect to a more powerful machine running e.g. XP, Server 2003 or for that matter some Linux dist etc. It is not equivalent of running the operating system natively, but for the given spec I think it would run faster than even if the 286 could be fitted for Windows XP.

i wrote a DOS VNC client that'll work in 320x200x8bpp and 640x480x4bpp. i had a thread here with it. it's going to be slow on a 286, though. :(

http://rubbermallet.org/qbvnc002.zip
make sure you load a packet driver and a mouse driver first if you try it!


but yeah, there's really no way you'll get that 286 running XP on it's own. it just can't handle the 32-bit addressing, and it's missing a bunch of required operations in the instruction set that a 586 class machine has.

Starshadow
January 16th, 2007, 06:12 PM
as far as AT boards that can run XP goes, I have a SS 7 motherboard with an AMD K-6II 500mhz that could easily run XP. I installed it in a generic 286/386 style case and installed 2000, however I see no reason why it wouldn't run XP well if i upped the RAM. My dad also has a k6 400 that is running XP and it runs quite smooth.