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Super-Slasher
December 31st, 2003, 10:22 AM
Just wondering if anyone out there for the sake of conversation has any interesting items that are still in their original packaging? I've got PC-DOS 6.3 and AOL 2.0...

http://www.furnation.com/ArchAngel/other/aol2.gif

Just curious, how valuable would this version of AOL be considered? Not that I care to sell it but it's nice to know these sort of things. This is even before Win95 came out, hehe.

So, share with us your unopened treasure items... :)

carlsson
January 1st, 2004, 06:50 AM
A remote acquaintance to me went to an adult school who had a cleanout, and she picked up some stuff, including an unopened box with PC-DOS 5 (IIRC). First she thought it was some cool software she could install, but when we informed her about its age, maybe it had a collectable value of some thousand $$$? Not quite, unless an awfully dedicated IBM collector was found.

Regarding AOL, maybe you know there is a site which collects AOL CDs and are planning to hire a truck and send them all back to AOL?

http://www.nomoreaolcds.com/

CP/M User
January 1st, 2004, 12:39 PM
"Super-Slasher" wrote:

> Just wondering if anyone out there for the sake of
> conversation has any interesting items that are
> still in their original packaging? I've got PC-DOS
> 6.3 and AOL 2.0...

I've seen PC-DOS 5.00 in a unopened box, which was
donated to us (quite some time ago when I was
working voluntry for a community group)

I also had a box of Windows 286 with it's Manual
still wrapped in plastic (I'd since opened it though).

> Just curious, how valuable would this version of AOL
> be considered? Not that I care to sell it but it's nice
> to know these sort of things. This is even before
> Win95 came out, hehe.

I believe that selling those items at a store doesn't
increase the value at all & I seen private sellers
selling their old software in unopened form, in which
didn't have any sort of price increase. So, I don't
think it does much if anything for the value.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
January 1st, 2004, 12:51 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> A remote acquaintance to me went to an adult
> school who had a cleanout, and she picked up
> some stuff, including an unopened box with
> PC-DOS 5 (IIRC).

It must be a small world, to find another person
who had an unopened box of PC-DOS 5. We had
3 or 4 donated to us, but we weren't out to make
money from it.

> First she thought it was some cool software she
> could install, but when we informed her about its
> age, maybe it had a collectable value of some
> thousand $$$?

> Not quite, unless an awfully dedicated IBM
> collector was found.

Exactly, I don't believe it would have that kinda of
value. Since I've seen a few unopened boxes of
this software, it's easy to assume that there are
more as lots of people might of brought it as back
up software in case their computers crack up, but
the computers were upgraded before that date
(that's my theory anyway). I believe that finding
an unopened/sealed box of some software
application (e.g. Word 1 for DOS) would be harder
as people buy this stuff to use, unless they
brought it as back-up (like they brought their copy
of PC-DOS 5 as back-up), which makes me think
on where they got the software in the first place
(perhaps the good ol' boot-legging ring! ;-)

> Regarding AOL, maybe you know there is a site
> which collects AOL CDs and are planning to hire
> a truck and send them all back to AOL?

That AOL is a pile of rubbish, I would just throw it
out, they always upgrade them, so you need to
upgrade them (with your computers), so unless
someone wants to study the files to design their
own trashy system, that's all it's good for! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

carlsson
January 1st, 2004, 11:18 PM
How was licensing accomplished with PC-DOS? Maybe companies and institutions would buy several copies but only use the media (and license key?) from one box and keep the other in case a license inventory was scheduled.

CP/M User
January 2nd, 2004, 12:02 AM
"carlsson" wrote:

> How was licensing accomplished with PC-DOS?
> Maybe companies and institutions would buy
> several copies but only use the media (and
> license key?) from one box and keep the other
> in case a license inventory was scheduled.

Yes, normally software is licensed in such a way
so that the entity in question would just have
one copy & also have a license to install it on
so many computers. This seemed to be the way
when I was at college, cause they just had plain
vanilla Win95 & generally was used per computer,
however they also had Novell Netware which was
the same deal (if my memory is correct) to
connect the computer systems to a network.

Because they had a license, it worked out cheaper
instead of buying 60 copies of Win95, which is why
it's popular way to buying & using software over a
number of systems.

Unfortunately, I don't know how it work in the
earlier days of CP/M, though when I first got into
computing using Macs, the system was on a
Network which mean't the system was awfully slow,
though this method also requires a license too I
should image. So perhaps CP/M was the same?

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Classicsat
January 4th, 2004, 10:37 AM
That AOL would be on floppy disc probably, and re-useable, if keeping it for archival purposes doesn't interest you.

dongfeng
January 4th, 2004, 11:04 AM
It was great when you used to get AOL/Compuserve disks through the post - you could reformat and reuse them unlike those crappy CD I get now :(

CP/M User
January 4th, 2004, 12:22 PM
"dongfeng" wrote:

> It was great when you used to get AOL/Compuserve
> disks through the post - you could reformat and
> reuse them unlike those crappy CD I get now :(

There's one thing I learn't from that floppy &
unfortunately Australia have to be a part of it too! :-(

CP/M User.

dongfeng
April 24th, 2004, 02:29 AM
I recently bought Windows 95 (version B) on floppy disk, which was still sealed in the original plastic bags. I (carefully) opened it though, since I needed to use it :shock:

Terry Yager
April 24th, 2004, 07:39 AM
Heh! A few years back I went to a school auction and picked up a truckload of software, (actually, I had to make 4 trips in my Nissan station wagon to get it all home) most of which was still in shrink-wrap. There were a lot of DOS 5 packages, and a bunch of MS Word 5.5 (last version for DOS), some Lotus stuff and the like. I was paying like a dollar a boxfull for big boxes of this stuff. I turned around and sold most of the stuff to a local computer store for anywhere from $5.00 to 20.00 per package. (I made a KILLIN!) I'm glad the school only chose to open a few of the packages to share among the many computers they were using the software on, even though they had purchased enough software for each individual computer.

:

BTW, I have a copy of Win 95 still in shrink if anyone is interested, $5.00 + postage & packaging. I believe it's the first (A) version, full install (OEM). (Even has MSIE (v.4.0) on a separate CD).



--T

Tim Wellman
August 20th, 2004, 10:44 AM
I have these gems from 1983, for PC/jr... one is a cartridge, the other doesn't say
http://users.zoominternet.net/~twellman/shrinked1.jpg

Computer Collector
January 23rd, 2005, 08:16 PM
Ive got timex Sinclair software on cassette, still sealed in the Noreleco boxes. If you are interested in trading for it, PM me

alltare
January 24th, 2005, 05:54 PM
I have unopened/still sealed Altair 4K BASIC on casette tape and unopened/still sealed Altair BASIC on paper tape, but I don't remember offhand which version it is. Also have an early sealed CP/M on 8" disk (v 1.4?), too.

It's all worth a few bucks since it's for Altair, but I agree with others that most old sealed software probably isn't worth much more than used stuff

Steve
===========================


Just wondering if anyone out there for the sake of conversation has any interesting items that are still in their original packaging? I've got PC-DOS 6.3 and AOL 2.0...

http://www.furnation.com/ArchAngel/other/aol2.gif

Just curious, how valuable would this version of AOL be considered? Not that I care to sell it but it's nice to know these sort of things. This is even before Win95 came out, hehe.

So, share with us your unopened treasure items... :)

Terry Yager
January 24th, 2005, 06:04 PM
I have unopened/still sealed Altair 4K BASIC on casette tape and unopened/still sealed Altair BASIC on paper tape, but I don't remember offhand which version it is. Also have an early sealed CP/M on 8" disk (v 1.4?), too.

Steve

You win! <bowing & scraping> I'm not worthy...I'm not worthy...I'm not worthy...

--T

carlsson
January 25th, 2005, 01:12 AM
I only have a shrink-wrapped copy of Barbarian (the Psygnosis arcade adventure, not the Palace fighting game) on tape for the C64. Many years ago there was a fair where they handed out free copies, so I got two. I doubt it would generate any money.

The fewer copies still around, the more likely a collector will go all out for it. If you found sealed copies of Altair Basic in every fifth flea market, it would not have much of a value despite being for the Altair - in particular if the actual computer still was rare so the tape could not be used by many people. :wink:

Thomas Hillebrandt
January 26th, 2005, 03:39 PM
Well, I have a PC-DOS or MS-DOS 5.0 in shrinkwrapped IBM box, like so many others...
...I also have an OS/2 Warp, shrinkwrapped - I forget which version...

To top it off, I have the original Dragon Data Demo tape in an unopened, sealed bag.

Oh, I have an MS-DOS 6.22 also... Almost forgot!

EvanK
January 26th, 2005, 06:32 PM
A few of the vintage handhelds in my collection (of about 30 total) are in their orginal packaging from the late 1970s.

Thomas Hillebrandt
January 27th, 2005, 12:59 AM
Ooo-ooo, I almost forgot!

I've also got a complete set of original, sealed, unused and un-tampered-with pens for a Commodore 1520 Plotter. The whole set of 5 or 6 packages, connected by perforations (you know; rip one of and use it), all still together. It is rather weak at the perforations, though, and I'm a bit worried that eventually it'll come apart - but they'd still all be there, and the individual packages would still be unopened...

carlsson
January 27th, 2005, 07:42 AM
The world is swamped with unopened PC DOS 5 packages.. I wonder if IBM once in desperation of poor sales threw them from an airplane, or if organisations were honest enough to get as many copies as they would install but only use one or two boxes worth of media.

The plotter pens are a nice thing, but I would believe they dry out and become useless (but still collectable) faster than a disk or tape media will lose its magnetition? It reminds me of someone keeping old bottles of cheap, non-seasonable wine until it is beyond vinegar. I know, I tried to have some sparking white wine bought in Hungary 4.5 years ago for last New Years Eve, but it smelled and tasted completely awful so I had to pour it in the sink. :(

Thomas Hillebrandt
January 27th, 2005, 08:05 AM
The world is swamped with unopened PC DOS 5 packages..

Yup! I remember upon getting mine (this was when I had just started collecting), I was all "WHOA!! Unopened...Cor, this is worth a lot!" .. Since then I've come across more than I've cared to keep count of...


The plotter pens are a nice thing, but I would believe they dry out and become useless (but still collectable) faster than a disk or tape media will lose its magnetition?

I wouldn't be surprised... But then, you won't hear it from me, because I'm not going to open them :wink: ...


It reminds me of someone keeping old bottles of cheap, non-seasonable wine until it is beyond vinegar.

We've all tried that, I think. Although, I'm not sure it can go BEYOND vinegar? Considering that Vinegar is used to preserve stuff in. I'd've probably used some of it in a sauce, or for marinating some beef, or something... :P [/u]

carlsson
January 27th, 2005, 08:18 AM
I'm no expert in chemistry or cooking, but what I meant is that it is so fermented (?) so it can not even be used as qualified vinegar. Oh, that reminds me of a comp.sys.cbm semi-regular who conducts experiments on his floppies like freezing them, micro-wave heating them, bury them two feet under ground for a week etc. Then he checked the condition of the floppies and if they still can be read and formatted. Probably he has already done the vinegar test.

Terry Yager
January 27th, 2005, 09:46 AM
The world is swamped with unopened PC DOS 5 packages.. I wonder if IBM once in desperation of poor sales threw them from an airplane, or if organisations were honest enough to get as many copies as they would install but only use one or two boxes worth of media.


Yeah, the biggest haul I ever made of unopened DOS 5 (and Word 5.0 & 5.1 for DOS, and other stuff) was from a school auction, where I was paying $1 - 2 per case of 12 packages. Obviously, they only used a few as pass-around disks, and left all the rest sealed.



The plotter pens are a nice thing, but I would believe they dry out and become useless (but still collectable)

The pens are still available, if you know where to look. Panasonic still sells them, as they are used in a Panasonic product that is still on the market, in Argentina. They cost about 8-9 bucks a set.

--T

Thomas Hillebrandt
January 27th, 2005, 11:06 AM
The pens are still available, if you know where to look. Panasonic still sells them, as they are used in a Panasonic product that is still on the market, in Argentina. They cost about 8-9 bucks a set.

Yeah, but I doubt they have a Commodore-logo on them... :P

Terry Yager
January 27th, 2005, 11:23 AM
Probably not...or Radio Shack, or Sharp, or any other manufacturer that used the same thing...

--T

Exluddite
January 27th, 2005, 07:04 PM
I'd imagine if you're really determined (or are just snowed in and have time to kill ) you could figure out a way to refill the pens.

Terry Yager
January 27th, 2005, 10:00 PM
I'd imagine if you're really determined (or are just snowed in and have time to kill ) you could figure out a way to refill the pens.

I don't think so. Those little pens are a very special type, tightly sealed and pressurized with gas in order to allow the ink to flow in a horizontal position, without the assistance of gravity. Quite the high-technology for something so simple.

--T

Exluddite
January 27th, 2005, 11:13 PM
I'd imagine if you're really determined (or are just snowed in and have time to kill ) you could figure out a way to refill the pens.

I don't think so. Those little pens are a very special type, tightly sealed and pressurized with gas in order to allow the ink to flow in a horizontal position, without the assistance of gravity. Quite the high-technology for something so simple.

--T
Oh ye of little faith. Any one of us could do that trick. What fun would it be if it was easy? :D

carlsson
January 28th, 2005, 04:02 AM
You mean if the vintage pens are up for sale, the seller can bundle a pack of fresh pens with the deal so the new owner does not by mistake try to use (and thus destroy the collectability) the old pens.

$1-2 for a twelve pack of unopened DOS 5-ish boxes? Sheesh. I realize it was a one time deal, but still...

Terry Yager
January 28th, 2005, 09:10 AM
Yeah, I took 'em all to a local computer store and sold 'em for a couple bucks apeice...made a helluva profit. (Of course, the store sold 'em for twenty buck$ and really made out).

--T

Unknown_K
January 28th, 2005, 12:33 PM
There are very few real vintage computer collectors from what I have seen. Any software that I have aquired shrinkwrapped gets opened to review the contents and to be installed. The only thing I value about something shrinkwrapped is that I can asume everything I need is there, but most people who keep 10 year old software in the box tend to have everything needed in the box anyway.

Computer Collector
January 28th, 2005, 05:42 PM
Barbarian (the Psygnosis arcade adventure,

I used to have this game for the Amiga 500. It was really fun. im sure the Amiga version had better graphics, though.

Terry Yager
January 28th, 2005, 06:24 PM
There are very few real vintage computer collectors from what I have seen. Any software that I have aquired shrinkwrapped gets opened to review the contents and to be installed. The only thing I value about something shrinkwrapped is that I can asume everything I need is there, but most people who keep 10 year old software in the box tend to have everything needed in the box anyway.

A man after my own heart! I bought an unbuilt kit for an S-100 board and completly destroyed it's "collectable value" by actually building it. (I mean, Ghawd forbid a computer collectable should be actually used). I just wanted to do it just to do it, so I could become a bona-fide member of the elite. ( Someone wanna teach me the secret handshake now)? My next goal is to grab one of the ZX-81 kits that keep poping up on eBay from time to time, just so I can say that I built a whole computer from scratch.

--T

Unknown_K
January 28th, 2005, 06:38 PM
There are some people who pay large amounts of money for very rare atari 2600 carts that are rare because they sucked so bad nobody purchased them and the stock was destroyed. I collect what is usefull, spending 100x the money just to be able to check off the last item made (which I will never use) doesn't thrill me even if I did have the money to spare.

When I purchase something for my collection I assume that the item has 0 resale value. This keeps me from buying things I realy have no use for, and it also keeps me from buying items on speculation (hoping I can resell and make money). There is a thin line you can cross from being a collector into being a dealer, and it ruins your hobby.

Terry Yager
January 28th, 2005, 07:08 PM
I usually collect things with the intention of keeping them forever, but sometimes I'll get tired of something, or run out of room to keep things or mebbe even re-focus my collection in another direction, in which case I'll find myself unloading sometimes large amounts of stuff. If I happen to turn a nice profit in the process, that's just fine with me, but I have been known to donate some pretty nice stuff too, just to save it from the landfill.

--T

Unknown_K
January 28th, 2005, 07:25 PM
I have a couple dozen machines setup, maybe 3 on a shelf not in use. Finding room for more would be a problem, but I have room for more software/manuals/books.

I bounce around between machines enough that I don't get burned out but you never know.

Terry Yager
January 28th, 2005, 07:35 PM
Sometimes an item's usefulness to me plays a part in my willingness to part with it. Something like a Nixdorf LK-3000 is extremely limited, and therefore likely to get the axe sooner. Also, things that may be semi-functional or non-functional are quick to go too, even though they may still have some sellable value. When I cull my herd, the non-productive, the weak, and the sickly go to the block first, as it's tough to justify keeping them on the feed bill.

--T

Unknown_K
January 28th, 2005, 07:44 PM
Most of my gear is early 90's vintage, some 80's too. Nothing I would call rare at all (well some addons are not that common but the base machines are not). Atari ST, Commodore 64/128, Amiga 500/2000/1200, Timex 2068, Apple IIgs, Tandy 1000HX, and a bunch of old pc's and 68k Macs (2 PPC model also).

mbbrutman
January 29th, 2005, 06:48 AM
Having rare stuff can make you paranoid too. I have parts for my PCjr that I never see the light of day because they are *impossible* to find replacements for.

Case in point - a SCSI adapter designed for a PCjr. Rather than use one of the 4 that I know are in existence (one of them being mine), I'd rather use a parallel port to SCSI adapter or build an ISA slot adapter for the Jr and learn BIOS programming. (That project is taking a while.)

I love talking about the parts and showing them to people, especially how they work, but I just can't bring myself to use them on a daily basis.

For the most part, the stuff that I have I intend to use. Something 'new' in a sealed box is almost a crime - it was never loved.

I managed to find a Koala Pad, new in the box for my PCjr. You're damned right, I broke the seal and used it!

Kaptain Skitzo
January 29th, 2005, 06:57 AM
I have two things of interest relating to this conversation:

The original C= calculator(still in box....removed once to make sure it works) that Commodore was selling back in the 70's to generate revenue for the Vic 20 and C=64 projects.

I also have a sealed in box copy of "Weird Dreams" for the C=64...something I never thought existed, because I had believed that new software for the 64 was already stopped. Hence the reason I left it sealed in the box, as it may have been the last game released(don't know how to confirm that).

Terry Yager
January 29th, 2005, 08:31 AM
IIRC, there were a few companies still producing new software for the C= 64 all the way up into the early '90s. (And some new stuff for the Apple ][ as well).

--T

Terry Yager
January 29th, 2005, 08:35 AM
I managed to find a Koala Pad, new in the box for my PCjr. You're damned right, I broke the seal and used it!

Good for you!
People used to wonder why I'd drive my classic/antique cars on a daily basis too. Same principle, a car is to drive. I would not get half the pleasure of ownership if it stayed in the garage all the time.

--T

Kaptain Skitzo
January 30th, 2005, 07:10 AM
My only problem with opening the stuff up, is that I want "bragging rights" to having a sealed copy. :D Besides, the game I have still shrink-wrapped isn't one I want to play on the 64...I have it for the Amiga. The calculator I just want to keep in pristene condition. I don't mind pulling it out of the box to show it. To me, it's a collectors item, one to be treasured. I have cheapie calculators for use when needed. :wink:

Terry Yager
January 30th, 2005, 09:14 AM
I wish...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5159593038&fromMakeTrack=true

--T

carlsson
February 2nd, 2005, 08:15 AM
FWIW, there still are companies selling new C64 games, like Protovision, Cronosoft and probably a bunch more (maybe Commodore World themselves if they acquired the rights to a good game, but who knows what will happen after Yearonihmo?).

CP/M User
April 21st, 2005, 12:28 PM
"Thomas Hillebrandt" wrote:

> Well, I have a PC-DOS or MS-DOS 5.0 in shrinkwrapped IBM
> box, like so many others...

I found DOSes to be quite commonly found in shrinkwrap I saw a couple (3 copies of PC-DOS) one time there, when I used to work at a place where people just donated stuff.

> ...I also have an OS/2 Warp, shrinkwrapped - I forget which
> version...

Would have to be either Version 3.x or 4.x of OS/2 Warp, version 2.x was simply known as OS/2.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Unknown_K
April 21st, 2005, 12:32 PM
At the companies I worked at it was common for one set of dos disks to be installed while the others stayed in the shrinkwrapped box, same with Windows 3.1.

patscc
April 21st, 2005, 06:28 PM
I guess if I had a lot of something shrink-wrapped, I'd keep a couple like that to sell down the road, but definately open one.
If it was just one, I'd pop it open as soon as I could, I want to have a backup of it before the media starts to fade.

Shrink-wrapped stuff seems to go for a bit more on eBay, but sometimes I wonder if it's really the original shrinkwrap ? Who's to know if it was shrink-wrapped 20 years ago, or yesterday ? Okay, I think the older stuff is crinklier, but would I swear to it ?
Reason I wonder is an aquaintance, few years back, bought "shrink-wrapped" DOS 2.1, and got it home, couldn't stand it, opened it up. Now, inside, the loose-leaf manual were already in the binder, which struck us both as suspicous, since I remember old DOS manuals had the loose-leaf shrink-wrapped, and you had to fill the binder yourself.

I wonder about the vintage chips that keep popping up, too. I mean, how hard would it be to get some factory in China, or Indonesia or somewhere, whip up a batch of fake 8008's ? Who'd know ? I can't see the people buying them on eBay actually testing them, can you ? This stuff happens with art all the time, so why not with chips ? Get a lot of 1000 made for, say, $100,000 or so, remember, we're not talking about an actual working chip, and sell them off, 1 a month, at ~200 a pop ? Not a bad deal.
Hhmn, I wonder what the equipment you need to make a 16-pin CERDIP is going for surplus these days, anyway ?

I can't stand having something shrink-wrapped that I don't open. I have to play with it. I guy I know was nice enough to send me a NIB Sony Magic Link, which is a early freak pen-based PDA kind of thing. Of course I opened it up and fired it up. I mean, how can you not ? It's funky, actually, kinda like Microsoft Bob meets a TRS80 model 100. I popped out the memory card( shipped with 1 Meg onboard/1 Meg PCMCIA ) and discovered the card will work in a HP95LX. Soon as I get a chance, I'll pull the entire unit apart to see what makes it cook.

I think there's a lot of collectors out there that hate people like me, for doing that to stuff. I can live with that.

Sure, like Kaptain Skitzo pointed out, I wouldn't open up a shrink-wrapped game for the C64 if I've already played it on the Amiga, either.

I bought a NIB NEC PC8201A from a guy on eBay, and it was truly mint, I don't think he even realized just how mint it had been, original receipt tucked in box, everything still packaged originally, and what's the first thing I did, after rubbing my hands and chuckling ? I pulled it out, fired it up, tried to get it to talk it my model 100 , ran the modem through a phone simulator to my Desktop.
I once picked up a boxed Pentium overdrive chip( the one for the 486/33 socket, what was it, socket 3, or something), and the first thing I did was to plop it into an old IBM to see what it would do.

In another post, I mentioned "Antiques Roadshow", and I had another amusing thought( well, to me at least )
You know how they're always going on about:
'Well, this is a fine 17th century footstool, but some one cut the legs, and then later on in it's life, a hole was cut into the top, and a midified tin milking bucket inserted into the hole, and nailed in place, so the actual value of the item is..."
That would be me, always messing around with the collectibles. Can't help it.

If I ever run into a virgin S100 kit, I'd do the same thing Terry did.
If I ran into the original, untouched DOS 1.1, I'd pop it open, back it up, and run it. Okay, maybe then I'd sell it, but I'd sure as heck make sure I played with it first.

patscc

CP/M User
April 22nd, 2005, 01:20 AM
"Unknown_K" wrote:

> At the companies I worked at it was common for one set of dos
> disks to be installed while the others stayed in the shrinkwrapped
> box, same with Windows 3.1.

geez, I gotta get hold of some shrinkwrap machine, maybe that's how many people come up with something in Shrinkwrap - there's just nothing more tempting then opening some shrinkwrap, just can't see how people keep this stuff for years without opening it :-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Unknown_K
April 22nd, 2005, 08:18 AM
I open all the games/apps I get that are shrinkwrapped. Software is to be used, not to sit on a shelf like a 2000 year old coin.

vic user
April 22nd, 2005, 09:26 AM
hehehe,

i have a sealed Treasure of Tarmin intellivision game, that i intend on NEVER opening.

it is my fav. video game, so i bought myself a brand new copy of it.

if the guy on ebay only knew, he could have just sold me the box and put whatever the hell he wanted inside, and just reshrink wrap it :)

chris

Micom 2000
April 22nd, 2005, 05:23 PM
Like many of you, most shrink-Wrapped items I acquired were quickly opened. The only ones I have left are the common MSDOS 5 (Upgrade -
Where any of the issues not upgrades ?), a Mac OS7, which is (was ?)
free on the Apple site, and an IBM Basic manual. That included an Apple
II-C LCD monitor, long sold off. Oh yeah, also a couple of OS-2 versions
and some oddball Dos stuff.

I acquired an original DR Gem Suite package some years ago, soon to be listed on e_Pay (whimper,whimper). I found the first disk had succumbed to bit-rot and I quickly stopped testing. In any case the disks can be found on Gaby's mirror of Tim Olmsteads " Unofficial CP/M site"
and I didn't want to incur any more damage without lubricating with isopropl and doing a quick copy. I dismissed (after some soul-searching) this as unworthy and besides the manuals are in mint shape, the idea of carefully peeling off the DR labels and putting them on copies, since a couple of years back a set had sold for around $200 on E-Pay

That alerted me to the dangers of hoarding "pristine" copies of software.
There is nothing more jangling than hearing the "scree, scree" sound of bit-rotted disks. I have some old CP/M and Dos software which I have cowardly avoided trying because of bitrot fear. I should really stern myself
and make copies of the older software I don't have copies of. I have copies of others downloaded or collected over the years that I burned to a CD with tips from usenet from one HD, but have to do a systematic and
logical catalogueing and burning of cds from the multitude of others I
have on 5 1/4 floppies, including non-Dos ones which I will have to make disk images of. A major undertaking.

carlsson
April 26th, 2005, 04:14 AM
if the guy on ebay only knew, he could have just sold me the box and put whatever the hell he wanted inside, and just reshrink wrap it
Yes, how common is it to re-shrinkwrap an item? If the box is in fairly good condition, can you tell whether its damage has occurred while inside the wrapping or before re-wrapping it? If you never open the package, you can also not tell if the contents inside seems used or not. It may be unethical to do something like that, but I'm sure people already are, in particular after finding how sought after some wrapped items are.

Terry Yager
April 26th, 2005, 05:28 AM
My kid used to collect baseball cards, and the same principal seems to apply. Unopened packs of cards demand a premium price, just on the chance that they might contain something valuable. (Of course, I could never resist the temptation to open them, either).

--T

carlsson
April 26th, 2005, 05:40 AM
Uh, you opened your kid's sealed packs of trading cards? :roll:

Terry Yager
April 26th, 2005, 05:53 AM
Well, we'd open them together, mostly (he inherited the curiosity gene, it seems).

--T