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View Full Version : Gettin rid of the black goo....



Chuck(G)
May 30th, 2017, 04:39 PM
I hate getting tape drives and whatnot where the rubber wheels have turned to sticky black goo. It gets everywhere and seemingly, is almost impossible to get rid of the stuff.

After cleaning out my truck's throttle body last week, I thought I'd give this stuff a go. Works like a charm:

https://gumout.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Car-Choke-Cleaner.png

FWIW, on DC-type drives, I use silicone vacuum tubing as a replacement. Seems to have plenty of grip.

commodorejohn
May 30th, 2017, 04:53 PM
Hmm, I'll have to remember that when I finally get around to fixing the floppy drives in my SQ-80 and DX7-IIFD. Last time I did one of these I spent about two hours going over the capstans with a chisel for debulking and copious quantities of Q-tips and rubbing alcohol for the fine cleanup. Then another ten minutes working my hands over with soap and hot water...

Chuck(G)
May 30th, 2017, 05:12 PM
Just use this stuff with adequate ventilation. It's basically a mixture of acetone and toluene. Inhale too much of the stuff and you'll go over like a Douglas-fir encountering a chainsaw. It's also flammable.

MikeS
May 30th, 2017, 05:26 PM
Thanks, Chuck; will have to try it. Might even work to clean some carbs needing TLC.

lutiana
May 30th, 2017, 05:52 PM
you'll go over like a Douglas-fir encountering a chainsaw. It's also flammable.

Challenge accepted, where's my lighter?

Al Kossow
May 30th, 2017, 06:07 PM
where's my lighter?

just toss the can in your burning barrel

Chuck(G)
May 30th, 2017, 06:18 PM
Thanks, Chuck; will have to try it. Might even work to clean some carbs needing TLC.

Maybe. I have a Ford F150 with the 302 EFI. The TPS went out and good ol' Ford puts that under, the throttle body, so you have pull off hoses and unbolt the throttle body. Of course, the intake manifold and throttle body are full of black carbon, thanks to the EGR stuff. Cleaning the manifold out won't do any good, but i wanted to clean the throttle body out. Worked okay and I wondered how it would work on rubber black good. Does the trick.

Unknown_K
May 30th, 2017, 06:52 PM
I have dozens of tape drives some of which are pretty old, am I the only one they don't turn into goo on?

KC9UDX
May 30th, 2017, 07:34 PM
Thanks, Chuck; will have to try it. Might even work to clean some carbs needing TLC.

These days the stuff they call gasoline dissolves both the "rubber" components in carburettors, but now also the zinc components. They don't gum up in the traditional way anymore. Unless you're lucky up dare and don't have canola gas mandates yet, eh.

Chuck(G)
May 30th, 2017, 08:06 PM
I have dozens of tape drives some of which are pretty old, am I the only one they don't turn into goo on?

It really depends on the rubber formulation. I've had drives made in the mid-late 1990s that were goo by 2010. I have drives made in the 1980s that are fine.

I've had the wonderful experience on at least two occasions of unpacking a sealed-in-the-mylar-bag factory-fresh drive to discover goo. It apparently has little to do with air pollution or UV.

Chuck(G)
May 30th, 2017, 08:08 PM
These days the stuff they call gasoline dissolves both the "rubber" components in carburettors, but now also the zinc components. They don't gum up in the traditional way anymore. Unless you're lucky up dare and don't have canola gas mandates yet, eh.

I lost count of the number of 2-cycle carbs that I've rebuilt. That ethanol really does a job on the rubber.

KC9UDX
May 30th, 2017, 08:43 PM
I lost count of the number of 2-cycle carbs that I've rebuilt. That ethanol really does a job on the rubber.

I don't know what they put in the cork gasket material to make it work, but ethanol treats it different than gasoline does. Ethanol turns it into concrete. Every carburettor I've put together with it since the Ethanol madnate has been totally leak-proof, but very difficult to disassemble and clean for reassembly. With real gasoline they weren't so leak proof, but you could reuse them over and over. I wouldn't even be making my own gaskets from cork sheet, but the "proper" parts got too expensive to keep replacing.

I had a run-around with my local Holley distributor when regular gasoline became cost-prohibitive. My rubber components (especially the "umbrella valve" but also gaskets and especially power valve diaphragms, were dissolving into goo. I was told I should be running alcohol-compatible parts, which at least at the time were not compatible with gasoline. I don't know what they make now, and I'll have to find out soon. I lost another power valve to ethanol recently and I've run out of the spares I bought eons ago.

KC9UDX
May 30th, 2017, 08:54 PM
I have dozens of tape drives some of which are pretty old, am I the only one they don't turn into goo on?

I have yet to have a pinch roller turn to goo, and I don't know why. (Except for the ones built into certain brands of Stereo 8 cartridge.) I've only had a very small percentage of rubber geartrain wheels get gooey (it's probably been 25 years or more since I last encountered that happening). But, I've had countless belts disintegrate. Usually I find that they can be removed without leaving residue if they are caught right away. But if they aren't removed carefully, or, the wheels they are mounted on have been turned, they turn into that hard-to-deal-with black goo. In fact almost everything I've worked on with a black rubber belt has had this problem in recent years.

GiGaBiTe
June 11th, 2017, 01:02 AM
These days the stuff they call gasoline dissolves both the "rubber" components in carburettors, but now also the zinc components. They don't gum up in the traditional way anymore. Unless you're lucky up dare and don't have canola gas mandates yet, eh.

I have an 88 Dakota and modern gas just destroys the fuel system. The worst leak I ever had to fix was a plastic fitting on top of the fuel tank started spraying fuel so I had a good stream of gasoline running down the sides of the fuel tank. After unbolting the bed and jacking one side up to get the dang thing off, it turns out there are two tiny O rings inside the fitting which the ethanol caused to harden up and shrink.

The fittings and fuel pump assembly are unobtanium for this truck (as are pretty much every other part), so I had to rebuild the fitting. Fortunately, Oriellys had a fuel system O ring kit and I was able to rebuild the fitting after several hours of messing with it. The O rings were way up inside the fitting and had a plastic washer separating them which needed to be in the right place.

I have to regularly change out sections of fuel hose because Chrysler thought it would be a bad idea to use a metal fuel line all the way to the top of the engine. I have 6 sections of metal fuel line and another 6 of rubber fuel line since its a return fuel system. Whenever I get a whiff of gas vapors from the A/C then I know its time to replace some section of hose.

Dwight Elvey
June 11th, 2017, 05:50 AM
I had jeep with a ford carburetor ( One of those years they used
pieces from here and there ).
It would start dying at an idle. I'd need to replace the power valve diaphragm
That the cleverly put at the very bottom of the carburetor, requiring it to be
completely removed, every time.
I guess that was better than on the side of the carburetor where the leak
would cause an engine fire.
Dwight

KC9UDX
June 11th, 2017, 07:58 AM
I have an 88 Dakota and modern gas just destroys the fuel system. The worst leak I ever had to fix was a plastic fitting on top of the fuel tank started spraying fuel so I had a good stream of gasoline running down the sides of the fuel tank. After unbolting the bed and jacking one side up to get the dang thing off, it turns out there are two tiny O rings inside the fitting which the ethanol caused to harden up and shrink.

The fittings and fuel pump assembly are unobtanium for this truck (as are pretty much every other part), so I had to rebuild the fitting. Fortunately, Oriellys had a fuel system O ring kit and I was able to rebuild the fitting after several hours of messing with it. The O rings were way up inside the fitting and had a plastic washer separating them which needed to be in the right place.

Chrysler could do worse. I had a 1985 Chrysler that did have steel fuel lines all the way to the top of the engine. From there to the fuel rail was rubber, necessitated by engine movement. But the way they formed the steel lines, if the rubber rotted off, high pressure fuel sprayed directly on the exhaust side of the turbocharger.

Apparently there were a lot of car fires due to that, but since I had heard about that before I bought it, I just made it a point to change those hoses periodically.

aarc
July 25th, 2017, 06:19 AM
I have dozens of tape drives some of which are pretty old, am I the only one they don't turn into goo on?

We had some real adventures with gooey capstan rollers in WangTek tape drives. Once they start to "goo-ify" they contaminate that tape and any other placed
in the drive. Reason? Chinese manufactured rubber. A place called "Terry's Rubber Rollers" will take your old roller and re-man it with real rubber.
Since using Terry years have passed with no goo.