PDA

View Full Version : This looks like a sham, shed some 'light' on it?



NathanAllan
January 8th, 2007, 12:48 AM
www.lightrelief.com

This looks like a really overdone heating pad. Is there anything else to it? Totally off-topic, but uses LED's. What do y'all think? is there *any* scientific thought behind this gao'uld-looking device?

Unknown_K
January 8th, 2007, 03:24 AM
Looks like a very low powered heatlamp to me, heat has been known to help out with muscle/back pain.

NathanAllan
January 8th, 2007, 10:00 AM
Yup. I figgered it was just a heater. I don't see light as a good therapy for pain. I have a heating pad already and it works good. I can't see any other basis that this thing will work. Thanks for the reply.

GraceUGrad2006
January 8th, 2007, 12:23 PM
There is always someone coming out with some ways to get people away from their money. Did you see how expensive it was? And it would not be any different than the heating pad you already have. But I am sure there are many people who think they are getting some miracle product because of the way ad was designed. When I first saw it it seemed like it was a new invention but as I read I realized it was just a pretty heating pad lol :)

Terry Yager
January 8th, 2007, 05:10 PM
That reminds me, yesterday, in Harbor Freight, I saw a new miracle device to improve fuel mileage. It's just a pair of magnets that ya clamp onto yer fuel line, and the fuel burns more efficiently after passing through the magnetic field. Right!
Of course, some people swear by those magnnetic bracelets to relieve pain, while others prefer the copper ones.
Myself, I always carry a rabbit's foot, to ward off tigers. So far, it's worked perfectly, I've never seen one around me yet.

--T

chuckcmagee
January 8th, 2007, 07:38 PM
I saw a new mirror ball on ebay yesterday. You could buy the mirror ball, hang it in your room, and shine one of those on the ball as a night light.

chuckcmagee
January 8th, 2007, 07:59 PM
NOTE that it is battery powered!! :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

grant
January 8th, 2007, 10:38 PM
There are facts behind it. NASA did the reasearch on which light wavelengths help tissue the best. "Medical Grade" products like this are used along with electric stim products. They just seem like a joke.

Terry Yager
January 9th, 2007, 07:59 AM
So what about this? More effective than lining my hat with tin-foil?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ih=016&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&viewitem=&item=260071239526&rd=1&rd=1

--T

chuckcmagee
January 9th, 2007, 10:41 AM
Nah, what you really need is like a VEST of tin-foil. That would work great (for about 2 hours until all that bending messed it up).

NathanAllan
January 9th, 2007, 05:50 PM
Nah, what you really need is like a VEST of tin-foil. That would work great (for about 2 hours until all that bending messed it up).

In the army some of our MOPP suits had tinfoil in them. Others had charcoal, both were in the lining ad you never knew past the olive drab green exterior and the black interior. Doesn't do anything for em as far as I know, though. You can get those kind of suits at the nicer mil surplus, I think.

That light thing looks like this guy's.

http://www.geocities.com/pestossimo/img/goauld.jpg

alexkerhead
January 9th, 2007, 06:23 PM
www.lightrelief.com

This looks like a really overdone heating pad. Is there anything else to it? Totally off-topic, but uses LED's. What do y'all think? is there *any* scientific thought behind this gao'uld-looking device?

They say it uses infrared light. Scientists think it might raise the risk of getting skin cancer. I'd be very weary.

nige the hippy
January 9th, 2007, 11:30 PM
A good few years back, I ripped a ligament on my knee.
As part of the physiotherapy, they shone a red light on it. When I asked the (rather nice) physio about it, she explained that certain wavelengths (red in particular) can actually penetrate quite deep into tissue, and for some reason (probably just that the input of energy helps the chemical reactions?) it seems to help the healing process.

May not be a scam, looks a bit prettier than the lamp the lady used, but that was 20 years ago

Nightowl
January 10th, 2007, 04:54 AM
That reminds me, yesterday, in Harbor Freight, I saw a new miracle device to improve fuel mileage. It's just a pair of magnets that ya clamp onto yer fuel line, and the fuel burns more efficiently after passing through the magnetic field. Right!
Of course, some people swear by those magnnetic bracelets to relieve pain, while others prefer the copper ones.
Myself, I always carry a rabbit's foot, to ward off tigers. So far, it's worked perfectly, I've never seen one around me yet.

--TI am not sure of the ages in here, but they had those magnets back in the 70's. My boss back then swore by them. I don't know if they work or not.:)

Gardoglee
April 1st, 2010, 11:38 PM
There is valid research on very long infrared penetrating tissue. In effect, our soft tissue is transparent to some frequencies. They are working to figure out how to use this, for example, for cancer therapies by injecting vitamin coated nanoparticles which are absorbed in higher numbers by cancer cells, and then irradiating with this long infrared atcarefully selected frequencies which can pentrate, and for whch the nanoparticles are the correct size to absorb in order to specifically overheat and kill the cancer cells.

That's the reality. As always happens, there are scammers who see the valid research, come up with a consumer product which superficially resembles the real research, and probably does nothing. The big giveaway on this one is that the frequencies of long infrared which actually do penetrate tissue are not visible, and would not "light up" the skin the way this product does. Therefore, it is almost certainly a scam. Another clue is the way they describe "FDA" approval. I do not recall the exact word they use, but while the implication is "the FDA approves this as valuable", the word they used was more indicative of "the FDA did not specifically label this as dangerous".

Last but not least is the whole question of whether an effectve product would be approved for consumer use by the FDA. There is, for example, a well established class of theraputic devices which use microwaves to do deep heating, which if I remember correctly are called diathermy. These are used by clinicians, but are potentially very dangerous if overused. Because you do not have the same nerves inside your tissues as on the surface it is very easy to not realize how much deep heat you are applying, and to cause great damage. Anything which actually did a significant amount of deep tissue heating as described in the ad for the Light Thingie Heater would have the same risks.

nige the hippy
April 2nd, 2010, 02:10 AM
Ancient thread, but thanks for the info!

barythrin
April 2nd, 2010, 08:45 PM
Not sure what the use is but I do know a chiropractor here who now uses an IR device for a deep skin massage/rejuvenation of joints. You can google around and I don't feel like endorsing them necessarily but he went somewhere to another professional who taught classes on this newish technology. So the IR massage while I too don't fully understand it for more than night vision lighting does seem to be a legit study of repairing skin and muscle thought I have no idea the proper management of it. I also know UV is used to kill germs now too and it's dependent on the time of the exposure so 60 seconds under a UV lamp is supposed to kill 99% of germs or so I've read.

So if it's enough to damage their cells (from what I understand it radiates the germ and breaks it's external barrier down) it should be noted that it could probably cause skin cell damage if misused (note IR and UV of course not the same spectrum).