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View Full Version : Osborne 1 videos by 8-bit guy



ppcmini
July 23rd, 2017, 04:44 PM
Osborne 1 Restoratation videos

https://youtu.be/BMujISwKnWk Part 1

https://youtu.be/lXkkJfWWPDk Part 2

https://youtu.be/h6PUWZ0FOZM Part 3

ef1j91
July 24th, 2017, 03:12 AM
Great production quality on the videos and helpful restoration tips. Too bad about the streaking. I didn't experience that when I retrobrighted an OCC-1A, but the hinge plastic did start to degrade.

Trixter
July 24th, 2017, 08:46 AM
The streaking is very unfortunate. I experienced a tiny amount of this myself when I decided to try the process on a piece I didn't care too much about (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlgzejPtJQM).

The only way to completely avoid uneven brightening is to submerge the entire part in clear hydrogen peroxide solution, but that is cost-prohibitive for most people when it comes to larger parts, which is why the "brush-on cream" is typically used.

I did scratch my head when he decided to put HP on the leather. If it's irritating for human skin, probably not a good idea to put it on animal skin...

8008guy
August 2nd, 2017, 08:05 PM
Thanks for posting the videos. Great information on the restoration.

JNZ
August 23rd, 2017, 12:24 PM
Though his videos are always well-produced, I have to question the wisdom of some of his tips.

He's been told multiple times that it's generally not a good idea to use Windex on anything you want to restore and preserve: it contains ammonia and can fog or discolor plastic, especially clear plastic. But he uses it as his go-to cleaning agent.

He's also fond of using tap water, even on metal parts like the connector in part 1. Why use tap water (which will corrode metal if not fully dried and will deposit ionized minerals) when you could use rubbing alcohol?

Worst of all though, in part two he says that the AC filter capacitor can simply be removed. "It's like your appendix," he claims. That cap is actually an output cap and it's there to prevent the machine from dumping EMI into your house's wiring. A replacement is $1.20; why not do the job properly? His PSU is now damaged and quite probably is operating outside of the performance characteristics that the FCC requires so that it doesn't interfere with other devices.

There are also two very similar capacitors on the PSU that are just as likely to pop like the first one. They should all be replaced, not just one removed.

Trixter
August 23rd, 2017, 12:42 PM
I've worked with him on a few things, and got the general impression that he only trusts the lessons he learns from himself. Meaning, he has to destroy something (see his video of the truly tragic retrobrite failure of the Osborne 1) before he accepts suggestions. He's a nice person in general, but he definitely doesn't take suggestions at face value.

He recently posted a video on multiple retrobright-style experiments. I was very disappointed by his lack of a proper testing method and control (keyboard keys are too small to show streaking, which was one of the major issues of the Obsborne failure), but I was positively shocked by two other outcomes he mentioned: One of the results went beyond lightening and actually bleached the plastic white, but that was considered a success (the original plastic color was ivory, not white), and the worst success is that he feels retrobrighting is best done with heat instead of UV light. I would NEVER intentionally expose plastic parts to heat -- that is going to artificially age them, possibly melt them, make them brittle, etc. Yes, sunlight as a catalyst also produces heat, but not 170F like his experiment.

KC9UDX
August 23rd, 2017, 02:57 PM
To be fair, FCC doesn't have jurisdiction over him, but I fully agree. He's even more likely than most people under FCC jurisdiction to cause harmful interference, and he's teaching many people to do this.

EMI is a huge problem and it's getting much much worse. Worst of all, the offenders just have no idea because they all have digital receivers and don't understand that their signal problems are due to EMI. Due to a lack of enforcement and the general attitude of entitlement, most people when they do find out they are causing interference either just don't care, or believe they have a right to do it.

zombienerd
August 23rd, 2017, 03:23 PM
the worst success is that he feels retrobrighting is best done with heat instead of UV light. I would NEVER intentionally expose plastic parts to heat -- that is going to artificially age them, possibly melt them, make them brittle, etc. Yes, sunlight as a catalyst also produces heat, but not 170F like his experiment.

To be fair, he does wrap each item in saran wrap before putting it out in the sun, or seals them in a large container. This produces a greenhouse effect, and much like a car, can reach temps of 200 degrees or more. You'll notice in his "retrobrite experiment" video, he could barely handle the mac cover he took out of the storage bin.

I have only used Blacklights in my retrobriting so far. It takes far longer, but rarely passes 90-100 degrees F.

It seems to me that the UV + Heat of the sun speeds up the procedure. He claims it's usually ~4 hours in the sun, while my blacklight runs take 18-24 hours.

I'd be willing to sacrifice a few older broken pieces to attempting an "oven retrobrite" just to see 1) if it works 2) if any damage occurs 3) any embrittlement. I plan to do this in the next week or so. I already have the Salon 40 creme I've used on my Packard Bell 300SX and a few keyboards under the blacklights. I'm planning on using the same way in my convection oven at 170 degrees for 4 hours.