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View Full Version : Modem and Dial-Up over VOIP?



ScanDisk
July 26th, 2017, 09:31 AM
My modem in the packard bell is working perfectly.

My family still has a traditional POTS analog phone line, however, we are planning to switch VOIP soon, we already upgraded our internet a week ago, which is part of a two piece package.

I've seen people say and post videos on YouTube about using a modem through VOIP, most of them work, though at a speed much lower than 56k. I've seen some people use some kind of converter box with cat5e or cat6 whatever cables at the other end.

As I said, the modem I have is from 1991, and I remember reading somewhere that it is 14.4k, however, when I do make connections, I always connect at 2400baud.

When we do switch to VOIP, we will get unlimited calling across Canada, and very cheap US calling (under $0.02/minute), which'd be good for me as I am Canadian.

So the free in canada, and cheap for the US long distance will be a great plus for me. However, what should I know? Should I expect it to work, are there some adapters or anything I'd need?

EDIT: I just found out that dialling #99 might help, but that's for dialling an access point, not a BBS or I guess it could be essentially the same thing? no?

Chuck(G)
July 26th, 2017, 09:51 AM
Don't expect high speeds--even 14.4K may be pushing it.

Strange that your voip service charges for calling cross-border. We use voipo.com, which doesn't charge for calls to either, as well as to many international places. I'm sure that there are even better, cheaper plans than mine--it just happened to fit my needs.

Stone
July 26th, 2017, 10:15 AM
Why get a phone?

Google Voice calls are free to/from USA and Canada (which is even better than the $0.02/minute rate you're getting with VOIP.

The call quality has been excellent as well.

krebizfan
July 26th, 2017, 10:50 AM
Check with your VOIP provider. Some VOIP device manufacturers have forums where this was a question 5 to 10 years ago and there may be advice there. Cisco devotes a chapter to modem passthrough over VOIP which does manage to reach 56k speeds reliably. The default setup will not achieve those speeds.

Without a specialized setup, data rates will be relatively low and disconnects frequent. This may have changed since I last researched it.

ScanDisk
July 26th, 2017, 10:55 AM
Don't expect high speeds--even 14.4K may be pushing it.

Strange that your voip service charges for calling cross-border. We use voipo.com, which doesn't charge for calls to either, as well as to many international places. I'm sure that there are even better, cheaper plans than mine--it just happened to fit my needs.

That's okay, I don't need high speeds, this machine has a 12mhz 286, 1mb ram, BIOS from 1989, Monitor from 1990, and modem is from 1991, so from before the internet age.

I will be using it to dial BBS's, because that's what people did back then. As I said, I always make connections at 2400baud.

As long as I can do that, I should be good, would I be able to get 2400baud?

Chuck(G)
July 26th, 2017, 11:30 AM
2400 should be doable (FWIW, a minor quibble: 2400 bps is actually 600 baud :) )

ScanDisk
July 26th, 2017, 11:42 AM
2400 should be doable (FWIW, a minor quibble: 2400 bps is actually 600 baud :) )

I learnt something new, none the less the speed isn't bad, art does take a second or two to draw, but only a second or two, and it didn't take more than a minute or even 30 seconds, more like it to download PKUNZIP from a BBS in the states.

Chuck(G)
July 26th, 2017, 12:45 PM
Back in the day, the devil was line noise. You'd be reading something and then there would be a burst of garbage.

That's probably one of the reasons for many early BBS operating in "glass tty" mode.

Line noise was also the curse of file transfer protocols, such as XMODEM and ZMODEM.

GiGaBiTe
July 26th, 2017, 01:11 PM
Line noise and telephone company scumbaggery was the scourge of mid to late 90s gaming. We had GTE for years and as soon as Verizon bought them out, the line quality went to hell. I had a 56k modem and was lucky to get a stable 24kbit out of it. Having to redial the connection constantly was common because a burp in the line would cause the modem to re-negotiate the connection to something even lower.

I had enough around 2001 and opted for crimewarner extortion instead, but at least the connection was stable and a hundred fold faster.

MikeS
July 26th, 2017, 02:00 PM
Why get a phone?

Google Voice calls are free to/from USA and Canada (which is even better than the $0.02/minute rate you're getting with VOIP.

The call quality has been excellent as well.
I use it a lot for outgoing calls, but don't you have to pay if you want incoming calls?

Stone
July 26th, 2017, 02:16 PM
I use it a lot for outgoing calls, but don't you have to pay if you want incoming calls?Yes, but I only use it one-way. If someone wants to call me that bad it's gonna be on their dime! :-)

Casey
July 27th, 2017, 08:05 AM
We were lucky in that southwest Ohio had Cincinnati Bell. Pretty good lines.

I was personally lucky in that our local Fidonet got to connect to the backbone via a Krogers WATTS line. One of our sysops worked for Krogers and they let him use the line at odd hours. Basically we got free LD until Krogers introduced some cost-cutting measures in the mid-90s, by which time the intertubez was killing Fidonet anyway.

The Cincy Bell DSL was nice, but Roadrunner was ten times as fast while making rude gestures at the DSL line. Also CB insisted on a login gateway which was regularly down, compared to RR's always-on functionality.

MikeS
July 27th, 2017, 09:36 AM
Yes, but I only use it one-way. If someone wants to call me that bad it's gonna be on their dime! :-)
Umm, you did ask, "Why get a phone?"; how are they gonna call ya if you don't have a phone?

My problem with using Google is that when they see 'Unknown number" or similar they assume it's junk and don't answer, so in the end it usually ends up with sending an email to schedule a Skype session ;-)

pearce_jj
July 27th, 2017, 10:18 AM
Music to my ears, in the UK the providers actually aren't allowed by OFFCOM to filter calls with no CLI, so no guesses for what presentation the scammers use.

Stone
July 27th, 2017, 10:43 AM
Umm, you did ask, "Why get a phone?"; how are they gonna call ya if you don't have a phone?


My family still has a traditional POTS analog phone line, however, we are planning to switch VOIP soon, we already upgraded our internet a week ago, which is part of a two piece package.Because they (obviously) already do have a phone!

And so does everybody else!!! :-)



My problem with using Google is that when they see 'Unknown number" or similar they assume it's junk and don't answer, so in the end it usually ends up with sending an email to schedule a Skype session ;-)Even though I can see your point I don't experience that in general.

FWIW, I called my new, out-of-state lawyer (who's just taking on a very big case for us) for the first time on Tuesday via Google and his paralegal picked it up immediately, on the first or second ring. :-)

Maybe my friends just aren't very paranoid or don't have CallerID or happen to see things somewhat like Trixter does (http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthread.php?58886-Big-brother-is-watching-you&p=470317#post470317) (he doesn't seem to be the tinfoil hat type) and answer the phone whenever it rings.

njroadfan
July 27th, 2017, 11:21 AM
Google Voice does assign you a phone number for people to call you, at least if you claim to be in the USA. You should have been prompted during account setup to pick an area code and number.

Chuck(G)
July 27th, 2017, 11:34 AM
I've got a "just in case" Google Voice number on a slot on my Obi200 box. It's useful if my VoIP carrier experiences an outage, I guess.

Stone
July 27th, 2017, 12:57 PM
Google Voice does assign you a phone number for people to call you, at least if you claim to be in the USA. You should have been prompted during account setup to pick an area code and number.I just used my existing number. :-)

MikeS
July 27th, 2017, 02:49 PM
Google Voice does assign you a phone number for people to call you, at least if you claim to be in the USA. You should have been prompted during account setup to pick an area code and number.
I thought that I remembered that initially outgoing calls were free but you had to pay for an incoming number; looks like that's changed and now they're both free of charge?

Will have to see if I can get past the USA only requirement for incoming...

Chuck(G)
July 27th, 2017, 03:36 PM
Yup, free both ways. There's a charge for international calls, though.

dlightman
July 27th, 2017, 04:46 PM
Some years back I was tasked with transporting POTS lines at 100's of remote sites via IP. We did extensive testing of nearly all the ATA devices and modems at the time and found that the Adtran TA900 series ATA and external Motorola ModemSURFR's 33.6 modems worked the best. Everything was SIP based and luckily I had end to end control of the circuits involved.

In addition to that ATA/modem combo we found that ATA configuration made a huge difference. Setting the the RTP payload size to 20ms, disabling the jitter buffer, packet loss concealment, automatic level control, non-linear suppression, echo cancellation, setting the FXS port rx/tx gain to 0/0 and using G.711 ULAW was the deployed config. Also for maximum reliability end to end latency had to be low with little to no packet loss.

For the record I was always against the conversion but once the bean counters realized they could save $15-30 x ~600 a month there was no other option. Also being a BBS guy I was a ardent USR Courier bigot and still to this day surprised the Motorola performed the best out of the dozens tested.