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OldCat
October 30th, 2017, 01:01 AM
As some of you already know, I am very interested in old laptops with weird displays. Early LCDs, plasma monitors (love these!) and electroluminescent displays. So far I've only found information about three types that would have it in some variants:

GRiD Compass II and Compass 1101 (x86, GridOS)
Dynamac EL-1701-A (68kMLA, Mac)
Data General One models 2 and 2T (x86, DOS)

Do you know any more than these listed above? Would you happen to have any photos?

I'd love to get my hands on one, too, but that would probably have to wait until I have larger budget for it, I suspect...

vwestlife
October 30th, 2017, 05:55 AM
Plenty of 1980s laptops used an LCD panel with an electroluminescent backlight, if that counts.

evildragon
October 30th, 2017, 06:05 AM
No I'm sure that doesn't count. ;) He's referring to screens that use electroluminescent as the pixels themselves. They usually cast a very yellow glow.

Moonferret
October 30th, 2017, 06:35 AM
The only other one I know of is the Informer terminal...

http://terminals-wiki.org/wiki/index.php/Informer_213_AE

There are some later Tempest GRiDs that also have the yellow electroluminescent displays.

Chuck(G)
October 30th, 2017, 07:47 AM
Plenty of 1980s laptops used an LCD panel with an electroluminescent backlight, if that counts.

I recall that, at one WCCF, some guy was selling what amounted to empty Grid cases with the EL backlight still in as a night light.

gslick
October 30th, 2017, 07:56 AM
Not a "PC", the HP Integral PC (or HP 9807A) had an electroluminescent display:

http://www.hpmuseum.net/display_item.php?hw=122
http://www.hpmuseum.net/images/Integral-35.jpg

billdeg
October 30th, 2017, 08:11 AM
http://www.vintagecomputer.net/microoffice/microoffice_roadrunner.jpg
Simply Paleolithic

ClassicHasClass
October 30th, 2017, 12:38 PM
That's a fascinating device. I like the cartridges.

Casey
October 30th, 2017, 04:40 PM
An ELD is different from a plasma display, as in the Compaq Portable III, no?

Chuck(G)
October 30th, 2017, 04:53 PM
Absolutely--plasma is gas ionized to glowing (think neon lamp). ELDs are basically a capacitor with a transparent front electrode and a phosphor embedded in the dielectric. They are run with AC, rather than DC.

http://www.edisontechcenter.org/electroluminescent.html

gslick
October 30th, 2017, 07:30 PM
The October 1985 issue of the HP Journal has an article on the design of the EL display used in the HP Integral PC.

http://www.hpl.hp.com/hpjournal/pdfs/IssuePDFs/1985-10.pdf

OldCat
October 31st, 2017, 12:53 AM
No I'm sure that doesn't count. ;) He's referring to screens that use electroluminescent as the pixels themselves. They usually cast a very yellow glow.

That's exactly what I meant, thank you evildragon!

Sorry if I didn't make myself clear, I didn't even know that ELD was used as the backlight for LCDs.

OldCat
October 31st, 2017, 12:55 AM
The October 1985 issue of the HP Journal has an article on the design of the EL display used in the HP Integral PC.

http://www.hpl.hp.com/hpjournal/pdfs/IssuePDFs/1985-10.pdf

That is very interesting! Would you happen to know if there was a similar article on plasma displays at some point (not necessarily in HP Journal)?

OldCat
October 31st, 2017, 01:00 AM
Absolutely--plasma is gas ionized to glowing (think neon lamp). ELDs are basically a capacitor with a transparent front electrode and a phosphor embedded in the dielectric. They are run with AC, rather than DC.


That is probably the shortest and most concise explanation I have ever seen on this subject. Nicely done, Chuck(G)!

The difference in these two screens is best seen when the two are placed next to each other:
41671

Casey
November 1st, 2017, 10:40 AM
Absolutely--plasma is gas ionized to glowing (think neon lamp). ELDs are basically a capacitor with a transparent front electrode and a phosphor embedded in the dielectric. They are run with AC, rather than DC.

http://www.edisontechcenter.org/electroluminescent.html

I see. Thanks!